Saturday, October 19, 2019

Newcastle Day 8,9,10 and Home

Most were a bit hungover as we had a late Sunday lunch at The Fox and Hounds, but of course the youngers who don't drink had no problem demolishing these monster desserts.No much happened that Sunday.


 A view of where we stayed with R's sister.


One neighbour has a new roof, the other doesn't.


Generally in Australia we say cemetery, but in Newcastle they say crematorium and abbreviate it to The Crem. It was my suggestion to make the visit to The Crem on the West Road to leave flowers for R's and his sister's parents and his brother who suicided. While he was in a relationship with a woman, he must have been with men too and at the height of the AIDS crisis, he thought he may have caught HIV and took his own life. I am not sure how it is known but R's mother told him when she visited Australia and when they were both 'tired and emotional' after a night out.


Of course firstly you have visit the florist, in this case the one we use to send flowers to R's sisters for their birthdays. We were back on the 39/40 bus for the return journey.


While they can be places of great sadness, I like visiting cemeteries. They are always such peaceful places, more so than anywhere else.


The Crem is very well kept.



I always have a wander at a cemetery and read some graves, and usually come across one of a child who died at a young age. It is sadly too common in the time of our modern cemeteries. 




I suppose we began packing that afternoon. R's middle sister, two nieces and great nephew visited for a little while in the evening and one of the nieces offered to take us to the airport the next morning, and she did. Before we left, R's youngest sister and her husband visited after breakfast. I felt very sad as I really didn't think we would ever see R's sisters again, his cousin who we visited and his brother in law's sister whose farm we visited. Given his cousin is nearly 80 and she smokes, I expect that will be the call will come first.

Gosh though, it was so nice to be home very very early Thursday morning after leaving Tuesday morning, such is the time change.

21 comments:

  1. I have never heard that a cemetary is called crematorium. That's usually where people are incinerated, which is more and more the use here and they had to built a second crematorium. There are no graves but a lawn with flowers where the ashes are dispersed. You can also ask for a urn and take it with you. The picture of the houses where R's sister lives look like the area where my friends live in Eastbourne, the houses look really very the same !

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    1. Gattina, same here. There are clearly burials there too.

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  2. I too like cemeteries. And grave stones. In a park in Hobart there are a few including one of a very young man who was killed 'by a blow from a whale'. I found it fascinating wandering around that park. How sad for R's brother - and the whole family.
    Isn't getting home after a long trip WONDERFUL (no matter how good the trip was).

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    1. EC, interesting about a blow from a whale. I guess he was a whaler. R's family have all moved on but it must have been devastating at the time. Yes, so good to be home. We like our home. Why do we leave?

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  3. It is sad to leave family behind when we are all getting on. I remember saying goodbye to my brother in England knowing I would probably not see him again. I was right. He died 3 months later.

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    1. Very sad Diane. Was that you brother who was in New Guinea?

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  4. Last funeral I was at, was an Aunt of mine and she made into her 90's
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, I expect my mother will make it to her 90s. I doubt I will.

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  5. I too love wandering around old cemeteries (not Crems). Here the graves seem to be all post-war; none of the very old stones one finds in the UK. I don't know where the others were buried; I must ask.

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    1. Cro, wouldn't they be churchyard graves pre war?

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    2. French graveyards are run by the local authorities, and not by the church. There are no graves surrounding churches as in the UK and elsewhere.

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  6. I like cemeteries, they're peaceful with everyone in them 'sleeping' round the clock. It is sad to see headstones for very young children though.

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    1. River, yes, so many people and not one to make a sound. It is sad about the kiddies dying young.

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  7. The cemetery you visited looks very well looked after. On Norfolk Island last year we visited the cemetery that was so full of history and it was located near the beautiful ocean. Colleen McCulloughs headstone just had her name and one word - Writer.

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    1. Cheryl, very well looked after. I liked Colleen and I like that she has a simple headstone in the place she chose to live and quite a beautiful place.

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  8. Whenever I go to Springvale to visit my mum and dad's grave, it is worth spending time wandering around seeing the other tombstones and their inscriptions. Each was a beloved (or not) member of a family, much missed.

    Unfortunately Springvale has no benches or trees, whereas I can see benches in your photo.

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    1. Hels, there are trees at Springvale. I know where my grandparents are buried because of the pine trees.

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  9. I used to like cemeteries, but now, so many of my family and dear friends are in them.
    I hope to live a long and healthful life. However there is no knowing, is there.
    I hope you live long too, Andrew.

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    1. None of us know Maribeth. So many die young. Thank you.

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  10. I rather like reading gravestone as long as I don't know the people involved to sad to visit people who I did know.
    Merle........

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    1. Merle, I don't mind either. It is nice to remember people you knew.

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