Thursday, October 03, 2019

Cambridge

It was raining as we arrived in Cambridge. An included tour was boating on River Cam with a Cambridge student at the helm to punt us along. It was too wet, the boating trip was too long at 45 minutes, no matter how hot the posh Cambridge student might be. We did our own thing and strangely where we chose to lunch at a comfortable pub, so did our tour leader. We just wandered among the crowds and when I say crowds, I really mean crowds. I don't know any of the buildings in my photos.

By 6pm we were back in London at the end of the tour at a cheapish hotel I had booked that did not have air con. Management had bought heaps of new fans and we had one which helped a little, that is it blew the hot air around in the room. We had left the coach at Greenwich Station and caught The Tube to Old Street Station. A recent new rebuild plan of the station has been rejected as it might have lead to youths loitering. A new plan is in place. It seems ok to me. The Old Street Station as we experienced was hard work, with no no escalators or lifts and we had to lug heavy suitcases up stairs. Then the monster roundabout was undergoing renovation and there weren't street signs. I tried to work out which was was up on my phone to find our hotel, but I couldn't. We tried each of the five roads with Google Maps open and once Madame said rerouting, we knew we had gone wrong. It was the last of the five roads we tried. How I wished we we were in Westminster where there are clear street signs. To say R was pissed orf is an understatement. Why didn't we get a cab? Perhaps he was right. Well, I didn't know about the mega road works or that there wasn't a lift at Old Street Station.

That is the end of our UK tour. We saw Wales, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland and England in thirteen days. I hope you enjoyed some aspect of my blogging of our holiday. I cannot say it was our best holiday ever, but it was ok.

However, it is not all over yet. The next day we caught the east coast train (LNER) to Newcastle to catch up with R's family for a week or so. Why didn't we travel first class!?






Who is this handsome man? Seems he caught me taking a photo. I don't remember seeing him. He looks a little cross? What does he want to do to me?



Caught again, I think. No doubt a Cambridge student, with strong arm, chest and leg muscles. I need to settle down.


Back to beautiful buildings.





Another gasometer skeleton discovered.







A proper mailbox.



Cambridge University Press, I suppose.





My usual skill at avoiding people in photos in busy areas totally failed this day. Mein Gott, was Cambridge flooded with tourists, in spite of the very ordinary weather.






This is interesting. I pushed the tourists out of the way to get a closer photo. I wonder what it is about.






A lock, I believe.


30 comments:

  1. It happens, some trips are better than others. It didn't that both of you were under the weather at the start. And yes, you must start spending the little extra on cabs and first class. It really makes a difference at our age, and helps with a relationship as well. John may call me a princess but I notice he enjoys the extra comforts as well.

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    1. Jackie, we are always learning and what can seem simple on a map can be very complicated. We will be spending more in future for the sake of ease and comfort.

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  2. Love the beauties (architectural and otherwise) you shared.
    Travelling together is frequently fraught for my partner and me. We have very different ideas about required comfort levels.

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    1. EC, and I can guess which was you differ about comfort levels, having seen some of your partner's travel photos.

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  3. I've found this a fascinating series of posts. The U.K. in 13 days! I live here, but you've seen things I haven't, and yet, I know of so much more it would have been impossible to see in such a brief time. I've sometimes thought, even in a single stately home for example, there are so many things to understand yet one could spend an hour, even more, just looking at one piece of art or one piece of furniture. There's beauty and wonder everywhere.

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    1. Tasker, thank you. Our friend in London had not seen the Giant's Causeway until shortly after we were there and she is very well travelled. Travelling like we did, you only touch the surface and tick a few majors off. There are still some interesting things to come from Geordieland.

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  4. I loved Cambridge. We found ourselves there on a Sunday where we had Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding, and drank Green Kings Abbott Ale. Lovely.
    I doubt Jack and I will travel together again. The last trip was a tough one.

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    1. Maribeth, we were there on a Saturday and the next day we were tucking into roast beef and Yorkies. Not sure about the ale. Yes re travelling when older, it is hard.

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  5. I love the old buildings. But I don't think I have seen photo of just plain every day folks homes.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, you are quite correct. Of course we did spend time with R's very normal English family, but I don't usually use photos of people we know.

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    2. But you could photograph some ordinary dwellings for those of us who like to see them.

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  6. I was at school just outside Cambridge, so I knew the town reasonably well; it was always filled with tourists. Just as a matter of interest, My school was (is) one of the world's oldest; founded in 790 AD. Considerably older than Cambridge University.

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    1. Cro, indeed it would be a good bit older. Did the Cambridge lads give you a hard time because they were at a 'better' school?

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    2. They weren't; school is for under 18's, university is for over 18's (roughly).

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  7. I've enjoyed travelling the UK via your camera, takes all the hassle out of a long holiday and I didn't even need to get a passport.
    Next time you book a hotel, check for air-conditioning before checking the price.

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    1. River, you are right about air con. At least where we were for the first week in London we had air con, and needed it. I should charge then for my blog posts as I saved you so much money.

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  8. What a shame that it was raining ! We had a wonderful punting in the sunshine and saw all these old colleges where also Prince Charles had studied. You make me laugh with your aircondition, we are happy when it is a little warm. The maybe 10 days per year where you would need one is not worthwhile ! Lots of people in the UK don't even have central heating !

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    1. Gattina, the commentary would have been very good on the punts, and well delivered in posh voices. I don't know of any blogger in the UK or anyone I know in the UK who doesn't have central heating.

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  9. Cambridge looks like fun, I need to go there. I was at Oxford for a conference a decade or so ago. You Ireland photos were inspiring, I have booked airline tickets for a couple of weeks of exploring in the early spring.

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    1. Travel, terrific that you are going to Ireland. Yes, the Irish stereotypes exist, especially the ones that they are extremely chatty and friendly.

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  10. I have been to quite a few summer academies in Cambridge since 1990, sleeping and eating in one of the colleges. The lectures were wonderful, the churches and colleges had intact medieval architecture, and meeting post grads from all over the world was an amazing experience.

    Even the pubs were huge fun.

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    1. Hels, by golly you have fitted a lot into your life. You are your mother's daughter for sure.

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  11. Cambridge has fabulous architecture Andrew, but as everywhere too many tourists. I'm using that as an excuse for not flying, it has absolutely nothing to do with my fears, it's the tourists, no seriously 😁😁😁

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    1. Of course that's the reason Grace. The sheer number of wonderful old buildings is overwhelming.

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  12. Well, I've enjoyed your 13-trip, and Cambridge was a bit of a surprise. Never knew it was a tourist town.

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    1. Kirk, nor did we until we arrived.

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  13. I have enjoyed your posts Andrew. Always interesting to follow other people's trips. I have been to Cambridge but only the once whereas I have visited Oxford many times and that is also busy with tourists. Always better to visit first thing in the morning or later in the day before or after the 'dreaded' coach tours!

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    1. Thanks Marie. You point about the time to visit is valid, and of course we couldn't control that, being one of the dreaded coach tour groups.

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  14. A couple of times now in this series you have said you don't know or aren't sure what the things in your pictures are, and it makes me smile, both because I tend to forget also and because I'm relieved I'm not the only one who doesn't keep track!

    And like River, I thank you for the free trip - I'd much rather travel from the comfort of my computer chair than in the best of accommodations and vehicles :) (Your cheque is in the mail - haha - I read your reply to River)

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    1. Jenny, because we saw so much, and I didn't really take notes, it was the worst holiday for remembering things. I will eagerly await an envelope from you.

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