Sunday, May 19, 2019

Sunday Selections

It's been a while since I have posted a Sunday Selection post. Maybe EC and River will have one prepared, or maybe not. Here we go then, miscellaneous photos, mostly mine and noted when not.

Autumn is such a nice time of the year in Melbourne. The evening light can be amazing, warm and golden, although the temperature may not be warm. Apartments across the road with tortured trees.


South Yarra basking in a warm glow.


South Yarra sun reflections.


Box Hill illuminations.


A rather unusual car I found somewhere on the net, sponsored perhaps by Cadbury.


Looks rather French to me, also found on the net.


He was a real hunk and with a pink pogo horse.



For his birthday Little Jo gave R a hamper of English food products she bought at her local supermarket. There must be an English enclave nearby as we never see these in any supermarket we have been in. We are having roast beef tonight. I pronounce 'shire' as in Yorkshire short. R mostly pronounces it long. We do the same with Devonshire, and he tells me I am wrong. Any other way of saying it than the way I do sounds wrong to me. We agree to disagree. We also disagree on the pronunciation of Edinburgh, with R inclined to a more literal pronunciation than my Endbrough. Words, ever fascinating. Marrowfat peas! I can't wait to try them!


Kangaroo paw bed in Frankston. Kangaroo paw is the floral emblem of our state of Western Australia.


I think agapanthus are grown in all but the coldest and hottest climates and are known all around the world. Residents of our building planted these at the base of the elm trees along the frontage of our building. Softens the impact of cars a bit.


No no. No private cars in Swanston Street. My, have I seen some very strange maneuvers by motorists who get trapped after ignoring umpteen signs and road markings. This one has decided to ignore the obvious fact that in the middle of a large city, there are no other cars on the road.


Clever, in our suburb of St Kilda.


We don't have to go into Flinders Lane or Sydney's Surrey Hills to find a pool exposed to the street. This one is in Chapel Street, South Yarra.


A hamburger restaurant in Bourke Street has an almost life sized fibreglass statue of cow in tiger stripes. Why?


We recently visited Heidi Gallery to see the exhibition of the art of the late and great Mirka Mora. Much of her work was bought by Heidi with a good bit of public fund raising. Terrific. We went through all of the Heidi galleries. We had never been in the original house before and it is lovely and so much nicer than the brutalist house built in the 1960s. We have decided that much modern art is not really our thing, even when explained to us. Even some mid 20th century art by the Heidelberg School of Painters is not to our taste. We have been to Heidi a few times and I have posted about it before. This was the only thing I found of interest to photograph.


Naughty varmints are corellas. They have been visiting the city to feast on London Plane Tree seed pods.



Only people as mad as us would pay so much for a Smeg kettle and toaster, and they aren't terribly good. The kettle is so heavy. Almost immediately the lid started sticking. The toaster toasts each side of bread unevenly.


The Tosser Thrower, in the Queen Victoria Gardens.


"Boss, this light pole is a bit split?" "Well, knock a few of those things into to it." I am really not sure about these things driven into the pole and how they can help the pole.


Japan. One can only hope that someone knows how this all works, and that there is succession planning for when that person retires or falls dead from work stress. Found somewhere or 'tother.


Cyclists fight with motorists for road space. Meanwhile pedestrians remain remarkably calm when their way is blocked by cars stopping where they shouldn't be after illegally entering blocked intersections, and the pedestrians just walk around the cars. Mind, pedestrians aren't guilt free at times either.


I was on my way to West Coburg showing a tram enthusiast from interstate around who wanted to take this trip. As we rounded this corner, the tram stopped abruptly and the female driver jumped out to chastise the van driver. Rightly so as he was in danger of  being squished.

35 comments:

  1. Love your selections this week.
    That rail labyrinth does my head in.
    Marrowfat peas? I have seen them in our supermarkets but have not been tempted. At all.
    Feeling a tad sad this morning, so I appreciate your selection even more.

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    1. EC, can't say we will be looking for marrowfat peas, but they were edible enough. Tad sad may be an understatement.

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  2. A varied and interesting selection, Andrew!

    That car certainly is different!

    Have a good week. It's been a great start to it so far!! :)

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    1. Thanks Lee. You mean my post made it a great start or the election result? 🤷‍♂️

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  3. Great mixture of piccies Andrew.

    Marrow fat peas - big and fat.......mash the with your fork and you get a sort of mushy pea concoction lol

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    1. Cathy, I knew you would know about them.

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  4. The Acland St shops are still looking terrific, especially for Sunday brunch :) TODAY!!

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    1. Hels, we brunched in Bay Street Port Melbourne today, busy with local people doing local things and no end of cafes to choose from.

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  5. I love me the marrowfats, have a can in my cupboard and also a packet of the dried. Emergency use only. We get quite a bit of Bwidish here in Newfoundland. Local Walmart has an aisle labelled "British." Lawdy I must take the camera out more. We also have Marmite.

    Pics are great, I enjoyed them immensely.

    XO
    WWW

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    1. WWW, I was with you until you mentioned Marmite. Disgusting compared our very superior Vegemite. Thanks.

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  6. Coffee pot looks real slick.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, kettle actually, but the coffee pot does go with your signature.

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  7. Your world is so different to mine. Here there are fields, trees and a few animals. Nowt else. Enjoy your Mushy Peas.

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    1. Cro, I grew up in the country and there was little there except as you describe buy that was also interesting (just not the mud and cow dung).

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  8. We have a British shop nearby only british products ! Bought scones and sour creme there yesterday. The shelves were rather empty and I joked "is that already a sign of Brexit ?" and they all laughed and said "there will never be a Brexit !" Hope they are right !

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    1. Gattina, what is to happen in England? They are spending millions on elections for the EU, even though they are supposed to leave, but there is no sign of that happening soon.

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  9. The "tortured" trees look interesting, I'm guessing they planted a golden and a green variety in each pot and entwined them as they grew, before clipping them into shape.
    Marrowfat peas?? Oh Dear God, they sound awful!
    The "chocolate" car looks like it is about to melt.

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    1. River, I never noticed that about the trees and you are quite right. The peas were ok, but I wouldn't choose to buy them. The car melting like Dali's clock!

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  10. I'm with EC, feeling gutted today. Autumn is a beautiful time of year especially the soft golden light and the deciduous trees

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    1. Cheryl, I haven't mentioned the war, but I feel the same as you. To win and sad to say, leaders must have charisma or schtick. That is what gets them past the post.

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  11. Love the "tortured trees", very stylish.
    The "Saint killed a burger" sign is pretty clever.

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    1. Sami, I too thought the sign was pretty clever.

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  12. That tiger cow is at The Burger Project, which is Neil Perry owned. The salted caramel shake is *amazing* he really brings the salt.

    I had a great work day yesterday just disappointed in the overall result because I feel that anyone who rolls an elected "leader" should not win their next election regardless of which side they are on. I was not overly enthusiastic about Shorten, but also do not like ScoMo. The last line of his victory speech put me off greatly. God bless Australia? No thanks, I must decline that concept.

    There was a great moment when I told the staff at our booth about Tony Abbott losing his seat. Every single one there - of varying political persuasions - cheered and applauded.

    I don't like any of our current "leaders" at all from all sides but the way Tony fought against marriage equality put me on the path to great dislike.. but then how he sat there at his sisters wedding with a face like he was sucking on a lemon cemented my utter hatred for that man. Especially with his KNOWING he was on camera at the time! I do not hate many people but he managed to get on the list. I only wish I could have seen his reaction to that news live and in person.

    Antony Green was a delight as always. I love that man.

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    1. Well well. Perry owned. I pretty well agree with all about Shorten and Morrison. God bless does not go down well with me. I missed the footage of him at his sister's wedding. I can imagine. I don't think I've ever disliked politicians with such passion as I now do, Abbott, Dutton, Kevin Andrews. Green is a treasure.

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  13. Lovely to see your Sunday selections again Andrew. The picture of the rail tracks in Japan looks amazingly like the picture below of the intersection below the Highrise 😉 Love the Art Deco poster of the ship and car 💙

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    1. Grace, our intersection is not quite that bad, although at times I wonder. Yes, the poster is great.

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  14. Great selection. Yorkshire puds and Japanese rail tracks are my favourites.

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    1. Marie, I bet you make the puddings from scratch as R's sisters do.

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  15. What you call a London Plane Tree also grows in most of America where it's called a Sycamore.

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    1. Andrew, the American Sycamore is Platanus occidentalis L. The London Plane Tree is Platanus acerifolia. According to Wikipedia, the following trees are called Sycamore in Australia:

      Litsea reticulata or Cryptocarya glaucescens (silver sycamore)
      Polyscias elegans (white sycamore)
      Cryptocarya obovata (white sycamore)
      Ceratopetalum succirubrum (satin sycamore)
      Cardwellia sublimia
      Cryptocarya hypospodia (bastard sycamore)
      Ceratopetalum virchowii (pink sycamore)
      Ceratopetalum corymbosum (mountain sycamore


      Both Australia and America have a tree that some people here mistake for a Sycamore. That tree is Liquidambar styraciflua, which, in America, is commonly called the Sweet Gum.

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    2. Interesting Snowy. What we call a sycamore is of the maple family. This could get long winded if I look to see what you call our sycamore.

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    3. I think we are on the same page with Liquidambar but why would the US call a deciduous tree a gum tree, which is not deciduous.?

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    4. "What we call a sycamore is of the maple family."

      Of the eight Australian sycamores listed in Wikipedia, none are in the maple family or genus (Sapindaceae acer). Might the common belief come from the fact that sycamores have maple-like leaves?

      "why would the US call a deciduous tree a gum tree, which is not deciduous?"

      Because liquidambar exudes a sweet sap or gum. I know of many conifers that also exude gum, but so far as I know, none of them are called that. I was told as a boy that people once used the soft inner bark of the Sweet Gum as toothbrushes.

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  16. Marrowfat peas, we love them and they are easy to find here so we have them when I do a roast beef with Yorkshire.

    Sick to death of drivers blocking the crosswalks! So civil in Spain.

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    1. Jackie, it is the same here. The traffic in Barcelona, aside from a couple of major roads, felt calm and quite restricted.

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