Monday, November 19, 2018

South Africa Day 11

We weren't too far from Kruger Park and the next day we explored Kruger Park through our coach windows.

I cannot remember where we saw this peacock.


Bananas growing. A warmer place than Melbourne.


It was an abnormally long truck, so I suppose the sign is appropriate.


We did not partake, but did admire the fountain.


There are a few entrances to Kruger National Park. Our coach entered using the Paul Kruger Gate.


He was once a South African president and was founder of the park.


He is a grim looking figure, for sure.


I did not realise the significance of this monument and so I did not take an overview photo.



Bless the rangers of Kruger Park who can be murdered in their line of duty.


Helpful.


Poisonous, so why have them everywhere at the gateway to Kruger Park?


Impala.


Blue starling, I think.


They are in pest numbers, but quite an attractive bird.


Look closely and you will see some mischievous visitors on this wonderful old train bridge.


So, through the bus windows, we saw many creatures, great and small. Giraffe.


Elephants.



Rhino. There are no stats published on the number of white rhino in South Africa, as to do so might indicate that poaching is no big issue. So many still get killed by poachers for rhino horn, something that is actually a combination of hair and fingernail material.



Bird nests.


Grace? Sami? What bird it this?


Naughty monkeys at our lunch stop.



I don't know this bird either. Perhaps it just a peacock.


The bird that was in the tree, now on the ground.


One very large termite mound.


Kudu, I believe.


I can't remember what this animal was called, but its upper back ruff identifies it.


Baboons.


The giraffe and the zebra did not bother each other, which is how our coach was seen by the animals. Our coach was not a threat and benign, and so accepted as another non threatening creature of the park by the animals.


I really liked the zebras.


I can't remember these animals at all.


A hippo below a bridge.


Elephants love water. They love mucking about in water, and they were.


But just twenty metres away was this log of wood.........or perhaps it isn't. 


Here a couple of brief videos I took, zebra crossing.


He seems to be rather more attracted to her than she does to him.



What a wonderful place is Kruger Park.

24 comments:

  1. It looks like a wonderful place.
    I do hope the original Mr Kruger smiled some days. This sculpture doesn't show a man that would tolerate fools gladly (or at all).
    That log with legs was an impressive sight.

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    1. EC, I put some zoom in to capture the 'log'. From the distance we were, with the naked eye, it did look like a log.

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  2. Incredible - Thanx For Sharing

    Cheers

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  3. Wow, love all those animals and the shots of the elephants down in the water. Beautiful. Must have been a great trip.

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    1. Strayer, it was good to watch the elephants in the water, just doing what they do.

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  4. Good little videos Andrew, I enjoyed.
    All the birds and animals are interesting to see..

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    1. Margaret, so pleased you liked the vids.

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  5. What a great experience; and I loved the Zebra crossing (no pictures of humans painted on the ground, I notice).

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    1. Cro, that would be seriously funny if there were.

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  6. Not sure what the mystery bird is Andrew, Sami will know. How fab to see the animals crossing in Kruger Park, loved your videos.. hope there's more to come ✨

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    1. Grace, wouldn't P know? Perhaps you don't show him my blog.

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    2. Andrew P said it is an African Yellow-billed Hornbill.

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    3. I should have remembered that, and you were correct. Sami did know.

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  7. Kruger National Park is a place I would love to see one day. Do they have big cats there? Or would they be a danger to the other animals? That is an odd looking bird, the one with the orange beak.

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    1. River, they do indeed have big cats. Stay tuned. It is a very natural environment for the animals and covers thousands of hectares but it is fenced.

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  8. Imagine seeing the giraffes, zebra, monkeys, rhinos etc just going about their business outside the train/coach windows. Cool!

    The closest I ever got to that experience was in Canada, travelling between Vancouver and Calgary, but nowhere nearly as many animals as you photographed.

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    1. Hels, we saw even better the next day. Wait and see. We saw a few animals in BC and Alberta too, but bears only behind shrubbery.

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  9. Did you know hippos kill more people than any other animal besides humans? I'd like that fountain in my yard.

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    1. Jah Teh. Do you know why? I will tell the reason in a post. The fountain is too grand for your shack.

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  10. You saw a lot of animals at Kruger Park Andrew, fabulous!
    The bird with the yellow beak is a yellow horned bill and the black bird with the red helmet is a guinea fowl. We used to have lots of them behind our house in George.

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    1. Thanks Sami. I now know I knew the name. And, we have guinea fowl here, so I should have recognised that too.

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  11. What an amazing place! Did you know I am an elephant lover? All my life. Just love them. Cannot explain it! Could that horned animal have been an Impala?

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    1. Maribeth, they are impressive beasts and so wonderful see up close in their environment. It wasn't the normal Impala we saw.

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