Saturday, July 21, 2018

Titch

Hels wrote a post today about Titch. That is 19th century funny man Little Titch, a kind of music hall performer who went on to greatness and riches. His walk inspired was copied by Charlie Chaplin. I have watched some Youtube clips of him performing, and he was very clever.

Some of you may remember back to earlier days when people were affectionately called Titch or Little Titch. I had forgotten about the name. It was usually given to someone who was shortish or petite. So interesting to learn of the origins of the name. Thanks Hels.

A friend of Ex Sis in Law is called Minnie, because she is so tiny. It is not her name. Perhaps we should call her Titch.

I don't want to see the word bonza in comments, but what other words can you remember from  your childhood that are no longer in use?


29 comments:

  1. My grandchildren don't know:
    1) what "barracking" for a football team meant
    2) what "cracker night" was eg Guy Fawkes Night and
    3) what "speedos" and "bathers" were.

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    1. 4) runners and sandshoes
      5) going to the pictures

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    2. I am surprised at speedos and barracking.

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  2. "Titch" doesn't ring a bell with me..."bonza/bonzer" does, though.

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    1. Lee, yet I have never heard anyone use bonzer in conversation, even when I was young.

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    2. Never heard "that was a bonza barbie last Sat'dee, mate"

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  3. Titch, to me, means a little bit, like "that stew needs a titch more salt"
    I think kids are inventing new words faster thn we are getting rid of old ones.

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    1. Mark, that might come from touch.

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  4. Lots of short people (not 'little people) in England were called Titch.
    One of my mother's cousins was called Totty - a shame because it can mean something entirely different to what her Scottish grandma meant when she first called her that - 'little' girl and indeed she was little only being about 5 foot tall.

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    1. Cathy, there is an Australian actress called Tottie but otherwise I have never heard the word. I can't guess where that would have come from.

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  5. Not aware of that expression, so something new I learned here Andrew :)

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  6. My mother was always called Bunty by her Scottish relatives as she was small.

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    1. Marie, I have heard the name, or nickname. The Scottish do have there own way of talking, then they had gaelic as well.

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  7. Titch is very familiar. And for a while I was indeed short. And while I knew about bonza I cannot remember ever hearing it at home.
    We have often commented that the term 'fire-engine red' will be meaningless to many now...

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    1. EC, aren't they still red? I am sure ours are.

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    2. Ours are lime green.

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    3. Very visible I'm sure, but how odd.

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    4. Not sure fire engine lime green will catch on with many people.

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  8. I remember a term; 'his nibs'. I never quite knew what it meant but usually it was used to refer to another person without using their name; eg 'his nibs told me x, y and z'. I haven't heard the term used in many years.

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    1. In my world "his nibs" usually meant someone who thought they were a bit above everyone else.

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    2. Good one Victor. I agree with River below. I don't think I have ever heard, her nibs.

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    3. That sounds right River.

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  9. Tacker as in he's just a little tacker yet, when referring to a toddler.

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    1. I really like that one and I think it is still occasionally used.

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  10. Well how funny is that! Titch is my nickname for Aimee, because she's petite.. but she would have a wobbly if anyone else called her that 😀😀

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    1. Grace, really! Clearly it is word known well to you.

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  11. Golly, I must be young, or perhaps we American's already screw up the language and I am totally unaware. I remember being called a "Little Bit of a Thing" when I was small, but I'm a tall lady now, so doubt one would say that.
    Interesting comments, Andrew.

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    1. Maribeth, the comedian was very successful in the US where he made a fortune. Often the the child called Titch would not be small, just the youngest, so perhaps that is the case for you.

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