Friday, July 06, 2018

The Bosenbergs

Of my maternal grandmother's twelve siblings, Ruby was the wild one and had a son out of wedlock. I think she was sent to the north west of Victoria to have her son and there she stayed. For a moment or two, I thought I had German blood, until I thought it through. Ruby went on to marry a chap with the family name of Bosenberg.

One of those genealogy sites sends me some information about family and recently sent a teaser about Fred Bosenberg, and if you want to know more, give us your first born child or whole estate. The email stated when and where he was born, when and where he died.

He was born in Bethany, South Australia. I am betting that Bethany is in the Barossa Valley and he was the son of a German immigrant (His mother also had a German name). While I don't really know about the latter, Bethany is certainly in the Barossa Valley. His parents might have been quite early German immigrants to the Barossa.

The grand daughter of  Ruby and Fred Bosenberg is of course Mother's cousin, Fred moved to to north western Victoria where Mother's cousin still live. She has been a lifelong  but long distance friend of Mother's. They used to meet at times, and have always exchanged Christmas and birthday cards, along with about every six months, long newsy letters.

I talked about this family stuff to Mother last weekend. She remembers from what she was told, that Fred Bosenberg was a cruel man, and his son was too, the father of Mother's cousin. My grandmother was never let out of the house when she was young to socialise, lest she go the way of her sister Ruby, who went on to have another child out of wedlock before she married Fred. I can't work this out now, but Mother's cousin discovered she had a Bosenberg half brother who was working in a factory in Dandenong. He has since died.

Damn shame really about the German thing. I would like to add more to my gene pool than English, Scottish, Swiss/Italian, Jewish, French and Danish genes. Confused about Swiss/Italian? There is a canton in southern Switzerland called Ticino where many Italians live, and where some of my paternal grandmother's family came from, settling in Waratah and later expanding to Launceston, in the Australian island state of Tasmania. Skeletons in closets, and all that.

27 comments:

  1. That is some family tree to try and research. Numerous siblings seemed to be far more common in those days.

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    1. Indeed Marie. Children died back in those days and were expendable, in a harsh way of phrasing it.

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  2. You know a lot more about your family tree than I do. Sometime I must see what I can discover.
    I am pretty certain that most families have a skeleton or two in the closet. And sometimes the bodies are surprisingly fresh and still smell.

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    1. EC, Annie O'Dyne did a good bit of research for me. Yes, always skeletons in the closet.

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  3. I filled out one of those geneaology websites once. After a while, I got an email about a lady with the same relatives, could I add her? I added her and now the tree is so complex I can't make heads or tales out of it.

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    1. Mark, do you have mixed heritage?

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  4. The beer fairy tree has been done by some one else, the beer fairy is to lazy, they came out in the first fleet, convicts of course no surprises there.
    Merle..........

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  5. Skeletons? Oh my, yes! When several of our family (who are very old) pass, I will write the story of this particular branch. Quite honestly, no one would believe the genealogical connections here.
    My grandmother's family was so interesting, having come over with the Pilgrims, and throwing a few American Presidents in along the way. She was so proud. I just found US History more interesting in school.
    I find the whole thing very interesting!

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    1. Maribeth, that does sound interesting. The good part about our younger countries, for non indigenous, is that we don't have quite so much history to learn as say England and Europe.

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  6. I'm quite happy...very happy, actually....to have only Scottish Highlanders and Irish in my ancestry. That will do me. :)

    Every family has skeletons...depending on how one looks at it, I guess. No family is perfect. Mine certainly wasn't.

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    1. Lee, I wasn't really aware until a few years ago that the mixing the blood of Scots and Irish is very common. You get the best of both worlds.

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  7. My father's older brother had an Italian given name, amongst his two English ones. He was Terenzio. Where the heck did THAT come from!

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    1. Cro, I rather like it as a name, but it certainly doesn't sound English.

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  8. Bosen means "very naughty" and berg means "mountain". I wonder what the original family did that was monumentally naughty ha ha.

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    1. Nicely done, Hels, and you have reminded me about berg and burg, the latter being a valley, I think.

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  9. You know a lot more about your gene pool than many other people I know. For me, all I know is German and Swedish, I know nothing of my father's ancestors.
    I do have a quiet giggle now and again remembering my own mother was born out of wedlock, even though her parents did eventually marry, yet she made such a fuss over my daughter, her grand daughter having two children before her wedding to their father.

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    1. River, that is rather double standard. People's attitude to these matters can be so variable. As you may remember, I don't really care.

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  10. Not to mention Mum's three sons with different fathers...

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    1. That's the icing on the cake! So two of your brothers are half brothers.

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    2. all three are half brothers.

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  11. Always good to know where you came from, seems to be a thing when you get older.
    So Waratah - mind you we visited there on the trip in March but won't have time to post photos, only have a few before we take off again for a 15 week journey north..

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    1. Margaret, hopefully you will get to it in the future. I've been anticipating your disappearance.

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  12. When my parents married in Germany in 1942 they had to prove that there was no Jew in the family for 3 generations ! Imagine !! So I am a "pure" breed. My grandma also had 12 siblings and apparently one of her brothers owned a circus !! Maybe I have inherited from her side ?

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    1. Gattina, it would have been critical in 1942 I imagine. Yes, I do think you may have a strong circus connection.

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  13. The wild child. Well you don't need German blood too, really do you? Your pedigree is well mixed already. The mix of heritage produces stronger people, like in dogs and cats. the in bred purebreds suffer all sorts of ailments while the mutts of life do far better. I saw a clever turn about on facebook a couple months back. It was an imagined exchange between an adoption specialist and potential cat adopter. She was saying is the cat purebred? And the reply from the adoption group was, "well, we want to know if you are purebred. We only adopt to purebred humans. Show us your papers." It was funnier the way they did it.

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    1. Strayer, that's funny. There were some medical issues with the royal families of Europe because of close relative marriages. Consider them the purebred. Otherwise it all comes down to survival of the fittest and smartest.

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