Sunday, June 10, 2018

A stroll in Yarra Park

A few weeks ago I took a walk in a park I had never visited before to take photos of one of the preserved Melbourne cabmen's shelter. The park is called Yarra Park, and it was quite pleasant. On the way I had to pass the Forum Theatre. It either has been or is being restored to its former glory. I hope the exterior receives some appropriate painting.


Yarra Park is in the southern part of East Melbourne known as Jolimont. In spite of is proximity to the city, parts of it are deliciously quiet and I think I read it is now greater Melbourne's most expensive suburb. Now smart apartments, the former Yarra Park State School. 


Lovely Victorian terrace houses.


I suppose I could research this tree, but one of you will tell me, I am sure. It seemed very interesting to school children but I did not feel comfortable imposing myself on the group.


Between where I am here the land slopes down to the Yarra River and then steeply climbs to the top of the Punt Road hill.


Swinburne is a university and I am not sure what happens at this branch. It is decorated with yellow and black as they are the colours of the 'Tigers', the Richmond Football Club which has its training ground and administration at the nearby Punt Road Oval.


The Melbourne Cricket Ground, MCG, is illuminated by these 'fly swat' lighting towers.

One of the most extraordinary things is that when football is played at the MCG, cars are allowed to park in this park. If it wet, parking is usually banned. Why on earth would anyone possibly want to drive to the MCG? The area becomes horribly congested as the park empties out after a game, and the cars are held back until pedestrians clear the area. You could probably be home on the train quicker than just getting out of the park in your car.


The Pelaco shirt sign can be seen in the distance.


Leftover Olympic rings from 1956?


There'd be trains nearby, lots of them.


Hisense Arena.


I don't know this building. Note the tram tracks for route 70 running next to the train tracks.


A handy bridge to get across the rail line and it is called........Nameless and did I spend some time to find out it is a nameless bridge.


Dimmeys clock tower in the distance.


For years the Nylex clock and temperature indicator have not worked, in spite of everyone wanting the unit to work. We can see it from our balcony. Note the name Sinch, a well known graffitist who was killed when train surfing. 


City Loop train tunnels.


 The Glen Waverley train has to go up and over some other railway lines.





While the wrath of Victor may well fall upon my head, all I will say is this is called AAMI Stadium and it is where rugby is played. 


I managed to find my way through the maze of sporting buildings and walkways until I found a lift to take me down to the tram stop to get back to the city. I walked down the side and behind Federation Square to the river bank for a well needed cup of fine coffee at Riverland. I don't think I have seen swans on the river before.



An attractive but dying leaf joined me for coffee. 



26 comments:

  1. We have a Jolimont Centre too. A modern and unexciting spot, primarily used to catch interstate coaches.
    Love your dying leaf shot.

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    1. EC, a US style Greyhound depot bus terminal? Not nice.

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  2. Well...I've just had a trip around parts of Melbourne, within minutes and didn't have to get off my chair!! Thank you! :)

    Have a good week, Andrew. :)

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    1. Lee, long have I been an armchair traveller as well as a real traveller. Both are good.

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  3. It shall be called Nameless Bridge, of course.

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    1. Hello to you Whimsy2. Yes, not a bad name for the bridge.

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  4. The black Australian swan had me

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    1. John, my childhood books told me swans were white. I was pretty surprised to learn ours are black.

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  5. Good tour around the area.
    Those terrace houses look alright and the old school too.
    The trains area is rather messy and most of them are that you see around.

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    1. Margaret, big train yards do look messy, but most of the time they work well enough.

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  6. Nice Swan. I've always found Black Swans very intriguing; Albino-ism in reverse. Thanks for the tour.

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    1. Cro, I have never seen a white swan that I saw and read about when I was a child.

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  7. Thanks Andrew ..... A guided tour ..... and it was free ..... well kind of free!! I'm so glad they are restoring that beautiful old theatre. Too many have been pulled down.

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    1. Charlie, it is wonderful building, inside and out and has some special memories for me.

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  8. Those crowds leaving the footy stadiums are beyond annoying. I remember working at Coles at the West Lakes shopping centre, right beside the Stadium, and working until closing, 9pm, then doing clean up and getting out quite late and wanting to be on a bus going home, but the night footy games would also be finishing then and the bus would take over an hour just getting out of the carpark area, so I wouldn't get home to Maylands on the other side of town until almost midnight, then have to be back at work the next day. I learned to catch up on sleep in both directions.
    I remember Pelaco is was the brand of choice for school wear and business shirts when I was young.

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    1. River, I can well imagine your frustration. It is so wrong that there wasn't priority for buses. Pelaco shirts were very smart and made in Australia but not designed for women.

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  9. The dead tree made me think of the one that was killed by vandals in the Botanical Gardens a few years ago. Anyhow, here is an article about that tree (and tree vandals in general):

    http://theconversation.com/acts-of-arborial-violence-tree-vandals-deprive-us-all-41342

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    1. Ad Rad, I know that tree in the Botanic Gardens well. Thanks for the most interesting link.

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  10. Those Victorian houses are just gorgeous. Changes over the years have somewhat upset the symmetry, but we are so lucky the building still survives. I heard a conference paper today on late Victorian architecture in Melbourne, some of which survives but some of which was totally destroyed :(

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    1. Hels, yes, there has been been so much loss of Victorian buildings in our lifetime. Let us try to stop any more.

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  11. There is something attractive to me about train yards and tracks. Like snail trails going everywhere.

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    1. Strayer, they are so complex and who knows which train uses which tracks. As you pass in a train, it is always changing tracks here.

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  12. I can’t say that you are wrong, so I’m saying nothing.

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  13. There's something rather appealing about mass train lines Andrew, all that coming and going! I see I'm not the only one who thinks so ☺

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