Thursday, May 03, 2018

Blogger and barbeque

Well, we met someone today who is not a blog writer and rarely a commenter, but he is certainly a blog reader. He and his partner reside in the lovely Perth suburb of Maylands and were on a semi regular visit to Melbourne for his partner's work. We met J for coffee near where he is staying and of course he was as pleasant and amusing as I expected he would be. You may not remember but we visited a very nice cafe in Maylands a couple of years ago with Grace of Perth Daily Photo and her husband. The cafe is named Chapels  on Whatley and of course as a local resident, J was familiar with the cafe. Hmm, gays own the cafe. Who would have thought.

Anyway, the meeting yesterday was very nice, although only for coffee as we had something else to attend to and it is always best when meeting someone new to be a little cautious until you can ascertain they are not axe murderers or even that you just don't communicate well. Next time we will be more generous hosts.

This photo taken from our balcony is meaningless to anyone except to who we met yesterday.


So, from there it was shopping time and no not boring food shopping but for a new barbeque. While the direct replacement for our old one is available everywhere and discounted, not the model with the temperature gauge. It is only available from a few specialist Weber dealers and is never discounted.

I gave the old barbeque a major strip down and clean about 18 months ago and with only half the gas jets clear, which I fixed, and a serious build up gunk removed, it was working well enough, although the ignition switch no longer worked and I had removed it. There were a couple of things that steered us strongly into buying a new one. Firstly our friend T in Launceston cooked us a lovely roast pork and vegetables in her larger Weber with a temperature gauge. While it not essential to know the temperature, it helps. Also you have to cook the roast sitting on a trivet which then sits on a special disposable foil tray and the trivet would not be available to fit our old model, plus the lid is a little higher on the new one to give more clearance for a large piece of meat, and who doesn't like a large piece of meat. Also, I checked on the net and barbeque gas hoses and regulator are supposed to be changed every five years, although I suggest that should be longer, but our hose came with the barbeque and was fifteen years old. Just to replace the hose and regulator was going to cost $50.

I did my research online and so we bought it from a small local company, BBQS Plus. We also bought the trivet, the foil roasting trays, a wire cleaning brush and a new cover. Steak tonight!

This is our second barbeque cover. The first lasted eleven years, the second only a couple of years before it started to break down.


After fifteen years, we both felt we had our money's worth from the old one. The new one weighs about half the weight as the old one, so I don't if the new one will last as long. The question at our age is will it last for the rest of  our life. I think we paid about the same in dollar terms for the old one as the new one, so that is a decent price reduction.


God help you if you touch anywhere else than the lid opening handle and the control dial. You will get black grease on your hands.


About half an hour to remove the old one and set up the new one and get rid of the packaging.


The grill bars are enamel whereas the old one had cast iron grill bars. These with be easier to clean.


All ready to go for tonight.


Later: The steaks were brilliant, just like the steaks on the old barbeque......ah, did we really need a new one? Yes, because hopefully we can roast with the new one and not stink out the place with the smell of roasting meat that can last for two days, never mind the subsequent oven cleaning. But there is no reason really that we could not have roasted on the old one. Bah, we stimulated the economy with our spending. It is the duty of the older to provide for the younger.

27 comments:

  1. ScoMo will reward you in next week's budget.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I certainly hope so Victor.

      Delete
  2. It looks great. Ours is rarely used. And is a humungously big affair.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, yes, they have to be easy to use and not involve a great setting up procedure. Even if we had the space, I am not sure I would want a big one.

      Delete
  3. I'd love to meet all of my bloggers in my fav list

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Darling John, you would be so disillusioned.

      Delete
  4. It's fascinating and intriguing, if the digital world meets the real world :-)!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ours is an electrickery one, although we have a bucket BBQ in which one can cremate protein offerings to the gods.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good laugh Jayne, thanks.

      Delete
  6. I have a strange German contraption, that looks as if it comes from the 1950's. It runs on charcoal has sliding doors to increase the temperature, and cooks perfectly. We use it almost nightly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cro, how interesting. I'd like to see more. Can you show us?

      Delete
  7. Always if possible good to be bloggers whether they comment or not, it's often chemistry between them.
    I'm glad to see your Webber has a temperature gauge as ours doesn't - I think it's the middle Webber as it's not the large or small one, so I suppose it's the middle one ...lol Not totally wrapped in our Webber which we purchased in summer, don't like the roast potatoes done it at all..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well Margaret, for anything grilled, steaks, sausages, lamb chops, our old and new Weber is excellent. We were full of pre dinner drinks at our Lonny friend's place when we had the roast and I cannot remember how the potatoes were.

      Delete
  8. It's a nice looking little barbecue. Whether or not it will last the rest of your life depends a lot on how often you use it. Does it get hot under it? I have a different type, a much older model, rectangular and I can't use it on a tabletop or anywhere because it radiates heat, I need to get something heatproof for it to stand on. It's a heat beads model, so no gas bottles for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, it gets used on average twice a week. Underneath is not too hot, which is just as well as it sits on top of the air con that has electrical circuits on top. Heat beads sound like hard work and a disincentive to regular use. For the price of you buying a new gas bottle and paying the postage, you can have our old one for free. It does still work fine but barqueing with the lid down is a technique to be learnt.

      Delete
    2. Nice offer, but no thanks, there really isn't anywhere in this flat that barbecuing can be done and I'm certainly not barbecuing on the tiny front porch with all the neighbours going past.

      Delete
  9. Looks very nice and I think you can cook anything you can cook elsewhere on a barbecue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, I believe so. Even cakes!

      Delete
  10. Enjoy the new barbecue and the nice meals you'll cook on it. I must say we hardly ever use the barbecue, but it's a huge thing outside...so just used for get-togethers maybe 3 or 4 times a year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sami, I think you are in the majority there but for twenty plus years we have cooked regularly on the barbeque. We've never had a really big one though.

      Delete
  11. Oh we did exactly the same thing Andrew, we had a perfectly good barbeque but I fancied a new Webber.. worked out well though because Aimee now has a perfectly good barbeque 😊 I'm thinking back to our first meeting, were you getting ready to make a quick get away up St Georges Terrace 😀😀

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, haha. We weren't and nor were you but it is a good idea to meet like that before offering anything more. We really like the way Weber's cook.

      Delete
  12. Enamel grill bars...interesting....very interesting, indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee, don't take me literally on that. The surface looks like the interior of an oven. We are assured they will last and time will tell.

      Delete
  13. Andrew, do you keep the bbq on the air conditioning unit and cook with the bbq while it is sitting on top of it? I have the same brand of air conditioning unit. It's a handy height but it never occurred to me I could use it as a table for a smallish bbq. Rest of balcony has no room.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ad Rad, we do exactly that. Doesn't seem to hurt the air con, although when it is and the barbeque is on, it sucks the greasy smoke through the unit, so once a year a get the scrubbing brush and nearly boiling hot soapy water and give the back fins a good scrub to get rid of the build up of grease.

      Delete