Wednesday, May 02, 2018

A river diversion

R told me he had once taken me to Pound Bend in the very outer suburb of Warrandyte. I did not deny it, but I didn't think so. A search of my blog tells me he did, back in 2006. It was early days of my blog and there were no comments. I didn't have blog love back then. It is so funny that today's experience was so like the one twelve years ago.

http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2006/06/pound-bend.html

So, our visit to Warrandyte (misspelt in the old post. Spell checker is much better now), was much the same, except the sat nav took us by a scenic route, but no longer timewise. I would have had to look at a map back in 2006, I think.

We parked the car at a riverside carpark in front of this shell. Once the home of Taffy Jones, it survived floods in 1934 when the water reached the second level but did not survive the Black Friday bushfires in 1939. Taffy was rebuilding when he suffered a fatal heart attack. 




Something to eat and coffee among the trees at the riverside Warrandyte Bakery.



A stroll along the riverbank back to the car.



It was very peaceful.


Because of the different direction we came in from, R was a little confused and could not work out how to get to Pound Bend. Eventually I stopped the car and entered the info into the very complicated and non instinctive sat nav and Madame GPS got us there. The water flows out from the tunnel here.




I could never live up there surrounded by gum trees. You would really struggle if a bad fire came.


Pound Bend tunnel photo June 2006 taken with my first digital camera.


Pound Bend tunnel taken 29th April, 2018, three or four cameras later. Very disappointing.


There is something wrong with my camera. I am ditching about a quarter of the photos I take because they are out of focus. The rotary dial keeps slipping from one setting to another. The lens is marked. It is getting close to 10,000 photos. While it can do marvellous things that I have never investigated, it has become a problematic point and shoot camera. Diane, it can't even put a grid on my screen to get my photos level.

Our acquaintance at Beacon Cove chatted to us at the wake after our friend's funeral. Back when he had a Samsung 5 phone, I had a Samsung 6. I now have a Samsung 8 from Kogan, aka Dick Smith. It is good. I like it. He went one better and bought a Samsung 8 Edge. He asked me what struck me about my new phone? I tried to second guess him, but could only answer everything is better. He then said, the camera is just brilliant. Well, R with his Samsung 7, told me I should forget about the camera and use my phone. While I have never really investigated my phone camera, on the odd occasions I have taken photos with it, they were good. It would certainly be much easier than bothering with taking a camera.

The clincher seems to be that my phone copes better with hand shakes and trembling than my camera does. So, I am going to give it a go and learn about the phone camera. Mind its file naming and downloading of photos is not good. Perhaps there is an app???

I better tell you a bit about Pound Bend. The Yarra River from there winds it way around to get to Melbourne with a 175 km circuitous route to cover about 30 km by road. Pound Bend is a misshapen horseshoe in the river, as you can see here.



The 200 metre tunnel was constructed in 1870 between the two close parts of the river through the narrow land neck, leaving the water level lower in the horseshoe and so easier to mine for alluvial gold. It was all very much a failure. Even without much rain of late, the horseshoe bend and the tunnel both seem to flow.

My god, the traffic coming home in Hoddle Street. What a congested city Melbourne has become, turning our old easy Sunday drives into a miserable and overcrowded traffic choked experience. Too much Missy. Too many people.

18 comments:

  1. That looks to be a very pretty area, although I agree bush fires would be something to worry about. It's one reason I changed my mind about ever living in the Adelaide hills area.
    My small digital camera, made by Sony,which I rarely take with me anymore, has an anti-shake feature which is very helpful for those of us with shaky hands.

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    1. River, I remember the 1982/3 fires in the Adelaide hills and they were truly terrifying. I had an experiment today with my phone camera and while close and even a bit distant, it does not do well with distant shots compared to the camera. Maybe there is a setting for distance. I expect if my camera had an anti shake setting, I would have quickly found it and turned it on.

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    2. I'm pretty sure the anti-shake is automatic, I don't remember ever having to turn it on.

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  2. I love a walk along riverbank. Love from sunny Poland

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    1. Gosia, seaside walks are nice, but river walks are more interesting.

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  3. After viewing hundreds of my photos from an overseas trip a friend commented that she should purchase a good digital camera because my photos showed the 'value of a good camera'. I had to admit that all of my photos were taken on my iPhone not my expensive ($1700) SLR camera which I had left at home.

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    1. Victor, thanks. I am really not sure what to do now. Just another problem loaded onto my first world life.

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  4. It looks like a truly lovely area. I hear you on the fire front - but when the firestorm hit my city it was the introduced cypress which acted like bunsen burners.
    I do love my digital camera. And struggle with the one on my rarely used phone.

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    1. EC, only about 40 minutes drive from the city. It is not an area I know or connect with, but I can see the appeal. I remember reading a series of blog posts by someone who lost their home in those fires a number of years ago. You are swaying me towards a new camera. Phones are hard to hold to take photos.

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  5. Phones do seem to take better photos these days!
    Beautiful place but, I agree, I couldn't live with all the combustibles.

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    1. Jayne, never mind high rise apartment dwellers living with combustible exteriors. Not ours, I say with relief.

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  6. The Bend does look rather nice and peaceful, always good to have a peaceful place to go to.
    The old camera certainly took a better photo than the one you are using now - yes, get rid of the camera and use your phone.
    I bought a new camera on Saturday, a Canon DSLR with 3 lenses as my Nikon DSLR has been around the clock many times, plus I like a challenge.

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    1. Oh Margaret, how exciting. A new really good camera for you. Of course our expectations will be high.

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    2. It is exciting and I'm sure when you get your new one if you do it will be for you too.

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  7. I need five things in life to be blissfully happy - good food, great coffee, trees & gardens, warm sunshine, river/beach and a book/magazine/newspaper. Oops 6 things.

    Warrandyte Bakery looked as if it had it all!

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    1. Hels, yes, you could pretty well say it does have all those things. While it not the Blue Danube, I rather like our modest Yarra River.

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  8. Looks like a nice area. So funny that you can track your trips via your blog Andrew.
    I take a lot of photos with my mobile, just hate the downloading to the computer side of it, but they are as good as the ones from my modest camera.

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    1. Sami, many times I have checked things by looking back at my blog, and from there I can get a rough date and find the appropriate dvd with the photos taken at the time. I am sure there is a programme to organise your phone photos when you download them.

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