Tuesday, April 03, 2018

The British Plug

Australia uses a quite simple electric plug for our appliances. North America and most Asian countries use even simpler plugs, but not Singapore, Malaysia or Hong Kong, all former British colonies.  In 2008 R bought a phone in Singapore. It came with a British plug and and an Australian adaptor plug, making it even bigger and uglier.

The British plug is big and ugly. Why is this so? The quite attractive presenter tells us why, and it is impressive. Yes, both R and Pants remember having to wire up a plug for a new appliance for whatever their electrical plug system was in Britain at the time. Who would have thought so much could be learnt about an electrical plug.





25 comments:

  1. Wow!
    I had never given any thought to the differences in our plugs across countries but that explanation makes it very easy to understand and - why the hell haven't we adopted something similar to the closed circuit/fuse inside the plug bizzo?

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    1. Jayne, cost I expect. Plugs are now so cheaply made, who would want to go to the large and ugly British one, which might cost three times the price. They are only to be found in England and a few former colonies, such as Singapore and I should think Hong Kong.

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  2. Interseting...Still no one shoould place an object in electric plug in

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    1. Dora, no one should, but toddlers will.

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    2. Not if they get their fingers smacked they won't, plus you keep an eye on them, the toddlers I mean, so they quickly learn what NO means.

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  3. I love the safety aspect.
    Hope all is well in your corner of the world, Andrew.

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    1. Sandra, a good but very expensive safety aspect. All is good, thanks.

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  4. So that is why it is so big and ugly.

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    1. Diane, it was certainly something I never knew. Some of our plugs have the coating on the pins.

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  5. That's video is rather interesting.
    Taught me a thing or two.

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  6. I remember explaining all that to a French Electrician. He was amazed.

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    1. Cro, remembering French plugs and wiring, I expect he was.

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  7. Keeping the safety aspect aside those plugs are/were a proverbial pain in the Aaaaas. Do you know how small those screws are and how awkward it is to wire one. Enough to make a grown man (or woman) cry.

    Oh the joy we felt at seeing moulded plugs on Australian appliances - although in the 1970s a lot of them could be removed and replaced in a similar manner manner to the UK ones.

    Taking those whopper adaptors overseas accounts for quite a bit of baggage weight - and space in the case. Well it always seems like it does:)

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    1. Cathy, I didn't think of you when I was writing the post. You would remember them well. I've rewired plenty of Aussie plugs in years past and it is a pain. Why can't there be one world standard for plugs?

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  8. The only thing which bothers me is that I always need an adaptor to take along and what he says in the video about our plugs is not true, apparently he has never seen or opened one !!

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    1. Gattina, I plead ignorance on that one. I don't know European plugs very well at all, except our Euro plug would not fit into the Hungarian power sockets.

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  9. I'll skip the video for now since I'll be staying forever in Australia.

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    1. River, be that as it may be that you won't venture from our shores, you may still find it interesting.

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  10. Found that video fascinating. Iremember putting a plug on appliances. It was something we were all taught at school. Must confess i do feel some of the European and American ones do not fit snugly or feel that safe.

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    1. Maire, I would argue that the Australian plug sits nicely in between. It is not bulky but does fit neatly into the socket, and we seem to have a lot more earth wiring here, with all our sockets having a opening for the earth pin. It is interesting that it was taught at school.

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  11. That is one impressive plug!

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    1. Strayer, certainly a very safe plug.

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  12. It was in the middle fifties when Britain changed to their present fused plug system. They were then and are now more proficient and altogether more safe than most other plugs - particularly those of Australia. The various coloured fuses range from 2 amps to 13 amps . I have some in my garage.

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    1. Thanks Vest for the extra info, especially the various fuse ratings. I think our oven and air con have switchboard fuses of 30 amps, the standard power points being 20 amps.

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