Sunday, April 29, 2018

Launceston Day 2&3 Pt 2

We called in on T's sister in Invermay to swap cars. We are now back in T's car, the one I took her to pick up in Melbourne ever so many years ago. Child seats were detached and put in the other car.

You simply cannot visit Launceston without a visit to Cataract Gorge. We last visited in 2003 and also went upstream of the the South Esk River to see the historic and disused hydro electric Duck Reach power station.


It is a wonderful recreational space and scenic place. So many failed photos, but here is the pick of the bunch. As you can see, we are high off the valley floor.


The chairlift takes you across the floor of the valley to the far side where there is a cafe and lovely  gardens.


There are various walking trails and this bridge is only for pedestrians.


We are off, on the chairlift to the other side. R and A were in the chair in front of me. I was on my own and took the photos. T stayed on the ground.


You can walk back into Launceston using the cliff side walkway.


Not a lot of water flowing today, but as you can see in this photo, the whole area was underwater when the river flooded in 2016, including the pool. Margaret took some great photos of the floods in Launceston.


I don't believe we used the chairlift when we were last there 15 years ago but walked like these folk.


T had a good therapeutic swing and fought off kiddies who wanted to swing while snapping us with her phone.


An inclinator, or cog, or rack and pinion lift up and down the side of the gorge.  I don't think that was here the last time we were here, but back then we had no need of it. It was appreciated for this visit. We helped some rather confused Indian born tourists with getting back up to the top.



The cafe on the far side of the gorge. Can you see the peahens on the ground?


And one on the cafe roof.


Two tame wallabies were on this far side of the valley.


Can you imagine what this bank of rhododendrons look like when in flower? They must be nearly 20 metres tall.


Return journey.





Who gets to live up there?


Strange kind of pine tree as we dismounted from the chair lift.


Finally a peacock rather than a peahen, but where is its display? The cute bare topped guy in the next peacock photo was so out of focus, I just deleted the photo. He was rather nice looking, smooth, muscular, long haired blonde and displaying his body for all to see. Ok, I have settled now. He was a show off pony.


But here is a photo I prepared earlier, of a peacock in Cataract Gorge back in 2003 when we were last in Launceston.


Yes, delayed flights the next morning. A made us toast for breakfast as T had to go to work. Although the fog on the lowlands of the airport was not nearly as thick as it was higher up where we were, it was the fog in Melbourne that totally screwed up Jetstar flights with its just in time commercial model. 

24 comments:

  1. Wow, wow and wow.
    I really need to go.

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    1. EC, indeed you should.

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  2. Ditto what EC said!

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    1. Have you been to Tassie Jayne? You would like it.

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  3. An Amazing Perspective There - Well Done

    Cheers

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    1. Thanks very much Padre.

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  4. I'm "killing three birds with one stone" here...or responding to three posts with one response.

    I've only visited Launceston once...and only very briefly...just a couple or so hours. I drove from Hobart up to Launceston and back again one day...back in June, 1987. I'd been in Hobart for almost a week on business. Nice memories.

    I'd love to go again...spend much longer there exploring the state...it is beautiful...and your pictures scratch the itch! :)

    Have a good week, Andrew. :)

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    1. Lee, it also such a relaxed and genuinely friendly place. It is a good thing about Tassie, that you can drive from the everywhere easily within one day, although as T said, Launcestons carry on like they are making an overseas trip if they have to go to Hobart.

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  5. I wasn't tempted by the chair lift over the valley floor because the fabulous views don't make up for any risk factor (in being stuck up on a wire, or the chair falling off). But I agree that the cafe, gardens and sunshine on the far side make it all worthwhile.

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    1. Hels, yes they go wrong at times, but generally not much in Australia.

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  6. Cataract Gorge is a must see but make sure its not windy when you ride the chair lift unless you are a adrenaline rush sort of person ... OMG I remember one time it was windy plus its bloody cold up there too!!! LOL

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    1. Lady J, that sounds unpleasant to say the least.

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  7. A bit scared of chair lifts, but I suppose you get the great views from above.
    Nice trip Andrew.

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    1. Sami, so you didn't go on the chair lift in Porto.

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  8. How nice to see someone else's photos of the Gorge and chairlift - have been on it several times but don't think I took photos, was too buy hanging on to my thongs (feet). It is magic when those rhododendrons are in bloom. Must think to visit if home when they come out and take and post photos of them.
    Thank you for the link - I forgot I had those photos of the flood.

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    1. Margaret, I was half way coming back and I realised my sunglasses were hanging from my pants pocket by the arm. I decide disaster was more likely to happen if I tried to retrieve them than just leave them there. Odd that I remembered you had flood photos. I had to search and while floods didn't bring up anything, flooding did.

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  9. A lovely place to visit. Bad luck with the weather for the return flight.

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    1. Diane, these things happen and while annoying, we did not have to be anywhere or have a connecting flight.

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  10. Really lovely photos, thank you. We have one of those strange pine trees here, the brown "candles" fall off and make quite a mess on the footpath and bits get picked up in the treads of sneakers and wheels.

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    1. Thanks River. It sounds like a nuisance tree to me.

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  11. I would love that place. Great views, lots to do etc. Have been off gallivanting again and am way behind reading blogs. Hope to catch up soon.

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    1. Marie, I am sure you would. There is plenty of natural beauty, along with what humans have made.

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  12. Just been back to read first part of your trip Andrew. Looks like you had a wonderful time and by the sound of all the walking you did, you will have returned very much fitter than when you left 😀

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    1. Grace, no not really. One really hard walk does not make us fitter, but however, it may have pushed us to try to be fitter.

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