Friday, March 30, 2018

The dead and the hungry

Our friend of 25 years died at 3pm Thursday. Life goes on. I will post more about him in the future.

I was having a bite to eat in QV in town last Monday. I was sitting at a long bar facing the escalators. A man came and sat next to me and began eating his lunch. The building jerked up and down for a couple of seconds. He looked across to me, to see if I was disturbed by this apparent earth tremor. I wasn't as I had already guessed what it was, though I have never experienced it before. A couple of minutes later it happened again and again he looked across at me. My bacon and egg buttie and phone were preocupying me. I had quickly realised that it was a rumble from underground trains in the City Loop. We certainly experienced the same at the Holiday Inn, in Potts Point, Sydney where we stayed when R's sister married her beau, that is noise and shaking from the Sydney's Eastern Suburbs railway.

As you can see in the photos, seagulls were going crazy around our place tonight. OMG, is an earthquake about to happen? R, I expect correctly, worked out why. It is either about food or sex, and in this case food. There will be chips on offer. I can only guess. A barbeque put on for the workers of Grand Prix that is nearly packed up? I can't believe workers would want to attend a work barbeque on Good Friday Eve. I can't believe that seagulls instantly flock like that. There was something happening that they knew about in advance. I would guess there was something like 100 to 200 hundred of them. As quickly as they arrived and flew around for about half an hour, they were gone. Make of it what you will. While I won't argue with nature, but surely flying around and expending energy in search of an energy intake also seems odd, but that is what seagulls do.




31 comments:

  1. In nature, everything comes down to food and sex. Actually, its really just sex. Food is merely for surviving and building up resources for the purpose of sex.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ad Rad, I suppose it is really.

      Delete
  2. Nature (including human nature) is often a mystery.
    I am sorry that about your loss. A twenty-five year friendship is a precious thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, if we can't even work out what seagulls are doing, what hope have we of understanding humans. Thanks.

      Delete
  3. Always happens with sea gulls, the thought of a morsel of food sends them wild.
    The Avenue of trees looks nice..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, within a couple of months the trees will leafless and a whole different world appears. Not that we can see in the other direction far, but you would not want to look at that as Metro Tunnel is constructed. It's a mess.

      Delete
  4. Food, sex, sex, food. At least the gulls don't go out like the male antechinus (native marsupial mouse-like critters) where they literally root themselves to death.
    Gulls are intelligent, in that they're able to spy a potential feed when us stupid pink monkeys start dragging a gas bottle out of the shed. In the gull words of Finding Nemo,
    "Mine ! Mine ! Mine ! Mine ! Mine!"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jayne, I knew a human who almost did the same as that creature. Fortunately seagulls don't see our barbeque cover come off.

      Delete
  5. At my local outdoor coffee shop, I always throw some pieces of sandwich bread for the seagulls. Now they come as soon as I sit down, before the sandwich is even ordered :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Held, so you are the culprit who feeds the gulls!

      Delete
    2. True *hangs head*. But I am there now, with my 3 bird mates, and they turned out to be pigeons.

      Delete
  6. (hugs) to you and R. I am sorry for the loss of your friend.

    I had a dream the other night where there was an earthquake and large skyscapers were trying to topple on top of our car.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Snoskred. I don't like stories or dreams of talk buildings toppling, for obvious reasons. I guess it didn't fall then.

      Delete
  7. Sorry for your loss. Sea gulls know where the food is that's for sure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Diane. At least our gulls aren't so large.

      Delete
  8. Odd about the seagulls, perhaps it was a search party for a missing gull.
    The train disturbance has me wondering now about London and New York, what must it be like to live close to their subway systems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, perhaps they do that if one gull is injured. I just can't imagine there being any food of significance below them. Yes, the noise is an issue. Imagine quiet piece of music in a concert hall, or a recording studio.

      Delete
  9. In my UK coastal town of Brighton, the Seagulls swoop down and steal chips directly out of the 'tourists' packets. They are a big nuisance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cro, indeed. We saw it at Blackpool and carefully protected our own appalling take away fish and chips accordingly. And your gulls are big buggers.

      Delete
    2. All those chips calories = obese gulls

      Delete
  10. All birds have their sentries out...keeping watch on what is happening and what is about to happen. I wonder if they get paid overtime? :)

    I'm sorry to learn about your friend, Andrew. Hold on tight to the memories...and freely smile and laugh at remembrances of the fun times shared.

    Have a Happy Easter! Maybe the seagulls are distributing Easter Eggs. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee, well it wasn't Good Friday last night, so no penalty rates were applicable.

      We do have great memories, thanks.

      I shall see perhaps on Sunday morning what the seagulls might have brought me. But I know what it will be. It will be a Haigh's bilby.

      Delete
    2. I disagree with the whole Bilby thing. I'm a traditionalist and I eat Easter Bunnies.

      Delete
  11. They are indeed odd.. birds that is! Seagulls in particular are like Beagle dogs, they can smell food from miles off. We had a Beagle years ago who could hear me from the top of the garden if I tried to open the fridge door silently to sneak a bit of choccy! Hugs coming your way, I'm glad you've got the Sydney trip coming up ✨

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Animals have some impressive senses, Grace. Thank you.

      Delete
  12. That was a bit odd but don't worry I sure all will be well tomorrow.
    Merle..............

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merle, it usually is.

      Delete
  13. I'm glad it was not an earthquake shaking your lunch building, nor causing the gulls to flock. They come here, to the valley, when there are severe storms on the coast. On the coast they are called by some rats of the air, probably because they are so plentiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, we reserve rats of the air for pigeons, but I would readily agree it could easily apply to seagulls.

      Delete
  14. A jerking building would make me very nervous....
    I'm sorry about your friend, Andrew. Sincere condolences.
    I had stopped by a couple of days ago but I wasn't sure if you wanted comments yet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sandra. I feel our own building wobble a bit at times. It is a good sign that it moves and does not snap in half.

      Delete