Tuesday, January 16, 2018

The changing earth of Melbourne

A train tunnel is being dug under Melbourne and some inner suburbs from the north west to the southeast, costing AU$11 billion, which hopefully includes everything, trains too.

While the site of one station is near us, it is half a kilometre away. Well, that's what we thought. Train stations need to be as long as trains and some more. It extends to very close to us. You saw my earlier photos of the massive works to reroute the tram down below The Highrise. Since then there has been massive work to move and replace pipes, drains, cables, conduits and many other services. This has led to road closures at different times. We once could access our car park from many directions. Now there is only one way in and one way out, left from Kingsway in, left into Kingsway out, meaning to go south on the main commuter road, Queens Road, we have to drive around the block through three more sets of traffic lights. This will continue to the end of February, but I fear it will  happen again, for a much longer period.

There is also city building demolition for the construction of the stations.

I don't think the demolition of Port Phillip Arcade in Flinders Street will worry too  many people. It was still there a week ago. I really hope the seahorse like sculpture can be kept and used elsewhere.


Around the corner in Swanston Street, these shops are closed and will be demolished.


These ones too but of course not Nicholas Building.


I am not sure about the Macleay College building, but it is quite ugly.


Awnings have been pulled down.


Oh, they've gone. That was quick.


Up  and on the other side of Swanston Street, City Square has been closed. As a public space, it never worked terribly well, no matter how many times it was re-invented.


Under City Square is a car park, and it is now being demolished.


A nice little touch, probably thought up by a publicity department and spin doctors. You can watch the car park demolition work through the window of a mockup of a train carriage.

29 comments:

  1. Lots of inconvenience for lots of people. Hopefully it will be worth it. And yes, viewing the demolition was a clever touch.

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    1. EC, the reward in 2026, apparently.

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  2. That City Square was hopeless, as a city square.
    As a space filled with the echoes of lost hopes, dreams, food wrappers and tears of past architects, it was perfect.

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    1. Fabulous description, Jayne.

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  3. The demolition of Port Phillip Arcade in Flinders St will upset me. Not because it has been so beautiful over the last decades but because Melbourne was famous for its Victorian arcades. Thank goodness Block and Royal Arcades are still lovely, although Cathedral Arcade needs a bit of jazzing up.

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    1. Hels, there is that point. I had to Google Cathedral Arcade. I know it, just not what it was called. The last time I was in that building, a few years ago, there was still a lift driver.

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    2. Oh yes Hels..... Paris is known for their arcades and we should protect ours too!!!!!

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  4. Interesting photos Andrew. How it was, always good to look back on.
    Must take a lot of planning and buying of those buildings and so on to take on such a big construction.

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    1. Margaret, it is a massive project. This is happening in several city locations, each individual project as big as the this.

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  5. I hate construction. It's so noisy and disruptive and dirty. Like an inside remodel. Kind of like hell. I hope its over soon for you, Andrew.

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    1. Strayer, I think we are going through the worst of it, but the project is not expected to end until 2026.

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  6. The mock-up train carriage is a good idea, people like to watch demolition work and this way there is no risk to them. I know the ongoing works are an inconvenience of major proportions, but how good will it be when finished? it will be one of those "best things we've ever done" moments especially if it all works as planned. I'm hoping Adelaide will eventually move to underground trains and other cities too. and I'll go one step further: Adelaide is almost entirely ringed by parklands, many of which are used by schools as sports grounds, but I think they could be developed underground as city parking. There's miles and miles of land under those parks going to waste.

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    1. River, it will be brilliant when it is done. I hope more money can be directed at the project and it is finished earlier. I put to you that SA and Adelaide would be far better investing the money in good public transport to the city than underground car parks on the edge of the city. Car dependant cities are never as nice as those cities that ban cars from the city centre.

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    2. Good point.

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  7. Go and take photos of that arcade before it is gone.

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    1. River, I will. But the earliest I can is Thursday next week.

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    2. Actually, I think it is too late. I think the arcade itself has been closed.

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  8. A lot of demolition to be undertaken, hope it will all be worthwhile in the end Andrew.

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    1. Sami, it is like planting a tree at my age, less so yours. You do it for future generations.

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  9. Wow! There's a lot to be done, and it's great to see the pics! Hugs...RO

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  10. Lots of demolition. I like the mockup train carriage.
    Keep us posted.

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    1. Sandra, the mockup train carriage has been quite a hit.

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  11. Oh I have always loved that Seahorse with that gold stamp . I think it went up when I was a teenager and I do hope they put it somewhere as it is our history ... but .... put it where it can not get bloody graffitied!!!

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    1. Lady J. It is the just the most lovely piece of artwork. I hope to see it somewhere, sometime, in the future.

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  12. Hi Andrew . I enjoyed reading this post. In most large Cities they are constantly digging, what for in most cases I have no idea. reminds me of " oh Mary this London's a wonderful sight where people are digging by day and by night.We are in the throes of a train strike . this in turn will help a lot and create more traffic confusion.

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    1. Vest, yes, that is what I tell my partner. That great cities are under constant reconstruction, as say London. Up the workers of the NSW train system.

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  13. Changes are a-foot....and a-train!

    Nothing remains the same...well,I guess somethings do.... :)

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    1. Lee, it will be a great thing once completed, but there is rather a lot of collateral damage along the way.

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