Thursday, December 14, 2017

I'll pay with a card, thanks

In his youth R worked in retail in the north of England. At times a customer would present a Scottish pound to pay for goods, which staff saw as being a nuisance but they reluctantly accepted the money. However, it was not 1 Scottish Pound for 1 English Pound.   I never really learnt how to write pounds in the correct way, so I can only express it like this; the Scottish pound was only worth 19 shillings and 6 pence. The customers trying to use Scottish pounds would get very cross about being shortchanged. I believe now both are of equal sterling value, but still many shops in England are reluctant to take them as they see so few, they don't know what they are supposed to look like and could be forgeries.

Man, this is crazy. Just to make it more confusing, three different Scottish banks issue different notes of the same denomination and are now all polymer. (Please do not use these pictures to forge Scottish bank notes, as I may have one, two or all three Scottish banks after me, if not the Bank of England)

Clydesdale Bank.


Royal Bank of Scotland.


Bank of Scotland.


Fans of Harry Potter will recognise this picture on this Bank of Scotland £10 note.


There was some recent bother on the budget airline easyJet (sic) when a man tried to pay for food and drinks with Scottish pound notes and the flight attendant refused to accept the notes. The aggrieved customer wrote to easyJet with his complaint and was told the attendant was correct in refusing to take the Scottish pounds. I like this man's persistence and it paid off and he eventually was told that Scottish notes were acceptable by easyJet and he received an apology (and hopefully some payola).

What else did I come across while researching this riveting topic? England has a new pound coin. Here is the new and the old. I like the new one. We have a few old pound coins which now can only be exchanged at banks and can't be spent in shops.


Bit different to here how quickly England declares that the old coin could no longer be used as payment, only exchanged at a bank. I think here the two are left in circulation for many years, pretty well until they naturally fall out of use as they wear out. A new $5 note was released in 2016 and there are still plenty of the old $5 notes around. A few months ago a new $10 was released and a few have passed through my wallet and money always passes fleetingly through my wallet.

Household Management has decided he is not going to use cash anymore and and only carry a little for emergencies. What convinced him was seeing someone pay with a card a for some roll your own cigarette filters priced at $1.60.

I mix and match it between cash and cards. I tend to use cash for things less than $20 and a card for things more than $20, but if there is a credit card fee, I will always try to pay by cash. It is getting to the stage where it costs the retailer more to deal with cash than a card and the credit card charge is usury .

I will show you our new and old notes soon when some stick in my wallet for long enough.

29 comments:

  1. I too use a mix of cash and cards. One point in favor of cash is that your purchases are not traced. Dictators / powerful governments will aim to eliminate cash as it will give them more control. Foe our own good, ha ha.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terra, that is quite true and stores do love to build your profile based on what you buy. Bit harder for retails to pocket some money and not pay tax too.

      Delete
  2. I mostly use cash. I find it easier to keep track of just how much I have spent.
    Old notes/coins only to be exchanged at the bank? That would keep them very, very busy here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, I expect by the time cash disappears, we will have disappeared too.

      Delete
  3. I went cashless in August of 2016. It has been brilliant. There is only one person who I pay in cash now and that is my nail lady but she now accepts eftpos and credit card so I can go back to totally cashless.

    R is going to find it pretty awesome, especially if he is like my Other Half and hates coins bulking up his wallet.

    I've never had a problem paying with the card, even for small amounts these days most places accept it with no charge. Since the retailers are now only allowed to charge what the bank charges them, the fee has gone down at most places and the convenience of not having to handle cash is worth the tiny charges to me. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Snoskred, good on you. I could except for the coffee machine at work.

      Delete
  4. The Scottish money sure sounds confusing, imagine the uproar here in Australia if we had that between our States and Territories.
    Like to new $5 and $10 notes.
    We use our card mainly the Debit one when home. It annoys me when people won't take 'cards', I've been known to walk out of that shop and go to another near by because I don't carry hardly any cash.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, yes, it would be very confusing indeed. One large shopping centre here is thinking of compelling all retailers to go cashless. Places that don't take cards will die.

      Delete
  5. No credit cards here all cash only.
    Merle...........

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merle, people get suspicious of cash only people.

      Delete
  6. Just recently I took out a $100 note in Myer and they looked at me and said "Oh.....(long pause)..... Cash" ...god I felt like I should be in a case at the Museum! LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lady J, so far as I can remember, I have never held a $100 note. There was talk of getting rid of them as only criminals find them useful to store large amounts of cash. You could have presented a Bank Card. Are they still around? Btw, you comment went to the spam folder, so in future don't worry if it doesn't appear immediately. I will find it.

      Delete
    2. You've never held a $100? That surprises me. Go down to your bank and get one, you actually feel richer when holding one. Well I do anyway, even if I only have it very briefly.

      Delete
  7. The coin fakers do such a good job these days, that the bank just accept them. I don't think the notes are quite as easy. An ancestor of mine was on one of your banknotes; guess who!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cro, do they really. I am surprised. It would be very hard to fake our new notes now. I would not have a clue about your ancestor. In fact I know little of anyone on a banknotes. Do tell?

      Delete
    2. It starts with 'Sir Joseph'.

      Delete
    3. Ah, a great man. I wonder what he first thought of some of our odd creatures.

      Delete
  8. How silly of Scotland to have three different fivers in use. Pick one design and stick with it. I like the new English pound coin.
    I use cash as much as possible for everything, taking only a certain amount with me when I go anywhere and stopping spending when that is gone or more usually, before the amount is gone. I like to come home with some money still in my pocket.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, I agree that it is rather silly to have three different notes. I also read somewhere that they are not legal tender, which does not make sense at all. I expect as we older cash users disappear, we will not be replaced by new cash users.

      Delete
  9. I wonder if it was my brother in law in the Easy Jet story, he is Scottish and persistent in the matters concerning money 😀 I tend to tap and pay for most things these days Andrew, even if I'm out for a coffee, it's just too easy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, probably not your bro in law and I think this man had young children. Tapping is so easy.

      Delete
  10. Fascinating. I've never heard of different faces on the same note or of no longer accepting a coin because it's had a facelift.
    Good post, Andrew.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra, they are rather fond of the drink in Scotland. Maybe they one inspiring evening.

      Delete
  11. Interesting info Andrew, but 3 different banks issuing notes can be very confusing to those who don't know the currency.
    I only use cash if it's a small amount and I will be charge for using a credit or savings card. When I use cash, when I get home I drop all small coins $0,50 cents and below in a jar we have and by the end of the year I take it to the bank. I took it a couple of days ago and had close to $70 in coins.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Sami, much as I do with cash and cards. My loose change goes in the coffee machine at work. It is amazing how change builds up if you save it.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I tend to use cash when having a pub lunch for some reason and lately have been told "oh, cash, how unusual"!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jackie, I don't think the use of cards is quite as widespread in the US. You would know better than I would.

      Delete
  14. there are still routine power outages and credit card processing machine failings here, so I carry cash. Most recently when I was trapping at the Circle K the clerk came out and posted a sign on the door. I couldn't read it from where I was sitting in my car so I went to look. Said "Cash only, machine not operating". I watched car after car, arrive, then leave without the occupants entering after they read the sign.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, that is not good. Our power is quite reliable, but if there is a problem, they bring out those old hand operated credit card machines, although I haven't seen one for a while.

      Delete