Saturday, November 18, 2017

Sydney Day 7 Pt 2 The End

Fairfax Press advertising campaign poster. They are rather good. The same has been done in Melbourne, using our own old photos.


There wasn't a lot to see at Darling Harbour, and like Manly the day before because of the weather, it was reasonably quiet. We had some lunch and then walked across Pyrmont Bridge to the city.

I rather wish I had made the videos a little longer. Children love to run around the spiral in the warmer weather.


It was hard to tell what this actually is, but it was an interesting screen.


Up onto Pyrmont Bridge.


Most of the old and much hated by many Sydney Monorail has been removed but this bit remains.


Pyrmont Bridge had a swing span to allow ships to pass below.


It was controlled from this tower using equipment similar to old trams. I understand the bridge took its power from the tram electric network, 750V DC.



The city side of the bridge. While the monorail was an eyesore and only went in one direction around the city, it was useful and I rather wished it was still there to get us into the centre of the city.



This is Sydney's new light rail tram line being built in George Street viewed from the Queen Victoria Building. There will be no overhead wires in George Street. Power will be picked up a the central contact area which you can see between the tracks. I will be certainly stepping over the bit where the power is picked up, although there are assurances that it will be safe.


QVB had its Christmas tree up, spanning a few floors, so you couldn't see all of it, but you could look up into it. When R gets stressed and/or tired, I find it hard to concentrate and work out public transport. I thought I found our bus stop but I wasn't sure, so R kept walking. I was correct but by then we were getting close to our hotel. He was exhausted. I had a bit of a rest.


I let R nap while I went out and caught the bus to Paddington Reservoir. It has an interesting history, and hasn't been used as a reservoir since 1899. It wasn't high enough to supply buildings of more than one storey in the area.


Some of a remaining wall in a paved area.


Petrol bowsers sat here at a service station from 1934 until 1990, when the roof below collapsed. I think we filled our car with petrol here in the 1980s.


After council amalgamations of the City of Sydney and part of City of Paddington, under Mayor Clover Moore funding was found to turn the site into a public park. It is a really nice little spot.


Paddington Town Hall across the way.




The underground part, where there would have once been water was mostly used after the reservoir closed as a vehicle depot for Sydney Water.




This part was temporarily closed to the public.


These may not be the original supporting timbers, however, the original timber supports were ironbark eucalypt trees, very strong and very durable.



Have I mentioned Sydney streets are very steep.



Typical Paddington housing.


A stretch of jacarandas outside Victoria Barracks.


Melbourne tourism advertising.


More Sydney Morning Herald posters.



Now, I knew the gay bar Midnight Shift had closed because James O'Brien wrote about the closing. In the 1990s we might have been found upstairs dancing away. In the 2000s, we tended to visit the downstairs area where things were relaxed and if you were lucky, you would get a seat in the open area to watch the passing parade on Oxford Street. The Colombian is now not too bad for that.




Speaking of The Columbian, I do like a lad in a dress. I had forgotten about photos I had taken on my phone.



Absolutely no idea where this is, but it is busy.


These are pedestrian lights in the paving. Clearly they are showing as, Don't Walk. They changed to green.


We ate here twice, this night included. No, not at The Den but next door at Pad Thai. In the 1990s we may have eaten at The Den. The food at Pad Thai  is really so good. Melbourne seems to have lost so many of its Thai restaurants, but they are still plentiful in Sydney.


Our flight was booked using accumulated flying points, doubled because I complained about the loss of our chosen seats when we flew to Europe earlier this year. Your choices of flying times are limited. We were on a 7am flight back to Melbourne. We caught a train to the airport at about 5.30. Because of Sydney Airport congestion, our flight was late, but by 10.00am we were home. Taxi fare, $60 as against Uber's $101. There was about $2 left on my Opal Card, $1.50 on my Seniors Opal Card and R had a about $2 on his Seniors Opal. What to do now at 10.00am? A lot of washing, actually.

19 comments:

  1. Loving your very different perspectives of a city I am not fond of (too busy, too noisy for me). I may have to reconsider.

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    1. EC, I blame the buses. Much more civilised in Melbourne with its trams.

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  2. I love my city but do not visit much now, a lot is new to me now.
    The Pyrmont Bridge, I seen it open a few time many years ago when we lived in Stanmore only walked across it once that I can remember.
    Merle.........

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    1. Merle, I would have loved to see the bridge work. I think it is the first time we have walked across as we normally travelled on the monorail.

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  3. I love the typical Paddo housing you show in the photo. Hopefully whatever is left of the 19th century housing stock is preserved by the National Trust and not made into MacDonalds.

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    1. Hels, I have no idea what the status of Paddo housing is, but I think it will be kept. It would be a travesty if it was destroyed.

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  4. I like what they've done with the old reservoir. I wonder if that monorail section will become a diner/cafe/restaurant?

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    1. River, that is very entrepreneurial of you, and why not? I am not sure why it hasn't been removed.

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  5. Interesting all of it.
    Do like the posters of yesteryear for the newspapers.
    Eye catching which they meant to do.
    The architecture is interesting to see - thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks Margaret. Your comments are always appreciated.

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  6. I too miss the monorail greatly. Sydney is a city where you have to walk a lot and the monorail was a beacon of sit down for a minute while I take you to the next place you want to go. :)

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    1. Snoskred, being a year or so older than yourself, I remember the protests against it being built and I sided with the protestors, including the late author Patrick White. It was an ugly beast and certainly not designed to be useful public transport, but I do concede tourists liked it and I did too.

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  7. Quite right, Snoskred

    The ex Sydney-siders at dinner tonight loved the monorail. Silly Sydney, removing it.

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    1. Oh how quickly we forget. The monorail was an eyesore with its track running alongside the first or second floors of some lovely old buildings. On rainy days the above ground level track sprayed water all over the pedestrians below it.

      The carriages were tiny and had minimal passenger capacity. Totally impractical for commuter movements. The windows were so blemished and marked that you couldn't see much through them.

      When the monorail broke down passengers were stuck inside the carriages in sauna like conditions. Apart from as a dubious novelty the monorail did not have a redeeming feature in my opinion.

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    2. Hels, it had to be significantly upgraded or ditched. I think ultimately the correct decision was made. The monorail on the Gold Coast has gone too now.

      Victor, it was popular in that it was nearly always crowded and I had forgotten, but it did not have air con? I remember a story of some bolts falling off the track or the vehicles onto the ground below. Can you recall who was in local council or state government who authorised its construction? Wran?

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  8. I still used the monorail the last time I visited Sydney. I crossed the Pyrmont bridge quite often as our hotel was close to the bridge. I'd never heard of that water reservoir, looks like a lovely space. Thanks for the tour Andrew.

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    1. My pleasure, Sami. I recall that every time we visited Sydney, the payment system on the Monorail was different, and of course more expensive than the last time.

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  9. What a nice trip and I feel like I went there and watched your travels. I enjoy this, being untraveled and mostly a home body, for all my reasons. So thank you for taking me along!

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    1. Strayer, and you travel without any stress.

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