Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Sydney Day 5

Doyle's fish and chips at Watsons Bay were on R's agenda. We have been to Watsons Bay before and it is very nice. The easiest way to get there is by ferry from Circular Quay but why do it so easily. I want to do it interesting and see some sites and sights. We caught the 389 bus to North Bondi Beach, which meanders through many curving streets before arriving at Bondi Junction and then more wandering in back streets until we reached North Bondi Beach. I think the motto of Sydney Buses must be, why travel in a straight line when you turn a corner instead. There is some history to this as the 389 route travelled along many streets that the North Bondi tram used to. We just took a look at Bondi Beach from above. We've been there a few times.





We then caught the 380 to Watsons Bay. By ordering our takeaway fish and chips as soon as we arrived, we avoided the queue that later formed. Seating is supplied under cover for eating your takeaway. We bought a g&t each to drink. An American couple were sitting on the table next to us and she asked R which of their serves of fish was the flathead. The flat one, R replied, without sarcasm.


I think the Doyles place you can see in this photo is the restaurant, much more expensive. There is a good pub there too where we ate last time we visited.


The city skyline was never far away from us.


Up above the small area of Watsons Bay shops is The Gap. It is open sea, not part of Sydney Harbour.


It is a majestic place. We had intended to walk to the lighthouse at the south head of the harbour, but it was warm and we lacked energy.



Sadly, very many people have jumped to their suicidal deaths at The Gap. This phone with a direct connection to Lifeline has prevented many deaths. Suiciding people often have a second thought or a pause before they commit the act, and that is why the phone is here.





Local shops, for local people.


On to the 325 bus to return our hotel. A school along the way.


A bridge glimpse.


Rose Bay, where R once worked.


The person in the apartment next to ours feeds the lorikeets irregularly, only twice while we were there, but each afternoon the lorikeets arrive to check if there is food. Incoming bird, but through the balcony door glass.



I slowly opened the balcony door and moved slowly and they were quite relaxed.




For dinner we caught the train one station from Museum to Central and then the tram one stop to Chinatown. I assumed we were in Little Hay Street, where we have eaten before, but it seemed all different. I didn't bother checking as there were plenty of places to eat. After a drink at the not pretentious but pretentiously named Convent Garden Hotel, we had a nice and quite cheap banquet (set menu) on street seating at a Chinese restaurant. It turned out to be that we were in Dixon Street. Tram and train back to our hotel.

Btw, in spite of their parrot shaped beaks, that of seed eaters, Rainbow Lorikeets do not eat seed, but nectar and pollen from flowering plants and fruits. 

Later edit: It seems Rainbow Lorikeets do eat some seed. 

28 comments:

  1. The Gap is not the only place where those direct access phones have been installed. They seem to be making a positive difference. Always scary receiving a call from one though.
    Loved seeing your trip. Thank you.

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    1. EC, I am sure it is as you know how close they are. Thanks.

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  2. The last time, and only time I've been to Doyle's was in late 1969...and we had a great time...and a great meal.

    And the last time I've been to Sydney was in 1987.

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    1. Lee, was that the one at Circular Quay? 1969! It has been around for a long time.

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  3. North Bondi Beach was always the gay end of the beach where the muscle Mary's etc would congregate. Not sure if it still is these days. A visit to Sydney should always include fish and chips at Doyles.

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    1. Allan, I have remembered now that we were on the beach at North Bondi about ten years ago, and it did have a gay feel to it. I agree about Doyles.

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  4. My beloved grew up in Bondi and went to the beach each morning before school. It looked fabulous then and still does now.

    When my closest Melbourne friend married a Sydney sider in 1970 and moved to Sydney, they took us for dinner to the first restaurant I have ever seen floating on water. I was thinking of Doyles, but it was actually called Flanagan's Afloat.

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    1. Hels, it is a wonderful sight. Google tells me that it was in Rose Bay, such a nice part of Sydney.

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  5. Watson's Bay is a lovely area, my first husband was stationed at the Army Barracks there from December 75 to late 78. We lived way out in the sticks at Glenfield, so it was a long drive twice a day for him. For a while we didn't have a car, so he'd catch the train from Liverpool and one day he was late and missed his train. That was the day the train crashed at Granville.

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    1. Wow River, such a close call. Army barracks there, which I guess is why there is a road named Military Road.

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  6. P.S. we've eaten fish and chips at Doyles, the area wasn't as developed as it is now.

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    1. River, Doyles must have been around forever.

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  7. I saw one of those phones on the Golden Gate bridge in San Francisco. Big resposibility for the person at the other end. The rainbow lorikeets are just the best looking birds. How could you not like a bird dressed up in all those colours.Only ever have fish and chips in the North.

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    1. Marie, and I hope the phone call takers never blame themselves if they they don't succeed. I may have been unlucky but of the three fish and chips I have eaten in England, the London pub fish and chips were the best. Very poor in Geordieland, and inedible in Blackpool.

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  8. We flew over bondi in a helicopter but never set foot on the sand

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    1. It must look magical from the air, John.

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  9. Doyles is my wife's favourite Sydney restaurant, but I thought it had closed!

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    1. Very much still going strong Cro. Maybe the one at Circular Quay closed.

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  10. Lovely pics - really took me back to my Sydney days in the seventies.

    Lorikeets will eat seeds, but they much prefer nectar. We didn't know that at first, and were putting out birdseed for them (in our backyard) which they were certainly eating. It was only after we went to a specialty bird place that we were told they prefer nectar. They sold us some expensive powder to mix with water, but also mentioned they like a 1 in 6 mix of watered down honey. And they do! They didn't give a stuff about the expensive gear, but the honey - yum, yum. Mind you, we still put out birdseed for the other birds and the loris still go for the seeds too.

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    1. Rozzie, gosh, Sydney in the 70s! So corrupt and such fun. Thanks for the lorikeet education. I have amended the post.

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  11. Like your photos. Never stopped in Sydney to walk anywhere let a long eat anywhere - oh yes, did stop at Botany Bay once, forgot about that.

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    1. Margaret, where would you park? Truly though, Sydney is a beautiful city if you stick to the harbour and seaside. Bondi Beach and Manly by ferry are must do things.

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  12. I couldn't believe how tame the lorikeets were! Andrew did you check out Sculpture by the Sea when you were at Bondi beach?

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    1. No Grace, we didn't see the sculptures. There was quite a crowd there for the sculptures.

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  13. Great photos Andrew. Loved the lorikeets on the balcony.

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    1. Sami, they were fun to watch.

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  14. wonderful post dear Andrew. thanks down the trip down memory lane. I used to get the 389 to Tamarama Beach, small with a ravine full of wildlife. Great shot of the landing Rainbow Lorikeet and yes they eat fruit.
    Of course I voted Yes.
    Those Americans having flathead were brave tourists.

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    1. Thanks Ann. Two visits ago we walked from Bondi Beach to Coogee and of course saw Tamarama Beach. I don't mind flathead.

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