Saturday, November 11, 2017

Sydney Day 4

This week is whooshing past, although we have done very little. The week in Sydney also whooshed past.

Victor is a very busy man, working two jobs, neither paid. He sees lots of films, plays, performances and travels often, within Australia and overseas. Yet he set aside his day off, Thursday, to show us some sights. How kind people of the internet have been, people who gone on to become friends. He collected us at our hotel at 10.30 and we crossed the bridge to the northern shores. Our first stop was Bradleys Head, a wonderful spot. We had seen it from our cruise the day before. It was so nice there, we wished we brought along a picnic lunch and a thermos. The weather was divine, sunny and warm but not hot. Bradleys Head was once a fortification.


This is a mast from HMAS Sydney.


Ah, across the shore is the building where Victor lives.


This is as good as time as any to bring this up. ABC local radio Sydney is very different to ABC local radio Melbourne. ABC Melbourne between 8.30 is quite hard hitting, with local, national and international matters discussed at quite speed by perhaps ABC's local radio senior broadcaster, Jon Faine. ABC Sydney local radio is so different, hosted by the quite lovely, funny and very clever Wendy Harmer. Instead of as in Melbourne between 8.30 and 9.00, Wendy was lightweight, with discussion of Sydney's jacaranda trees in bloom and brush turkeys. They have come into Sydney of late, like the Bin Chickens did some years ago, aka Ibis.They cause havoc in people's gardens and are becoming a pest. I did laugh when a radio caller in said to spray them with a water pistol to get rid of them, and Wendy responded, no, that does not work. She knew as her own garden had been invaded. Brush turkeys are native birds, so can't be easily dealt with as they are protected. Here is a brush turkey.


Maybe you have worked out that that this is the Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge.


This column came from the original demolished Sydney Post Office. Doric, is it?


The brush turkey is an interesting looking bird, but it is invading.




Ah, did I mention the view of the Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge?



Train tracks out onto the pier, perhaps for the supply of provisions of whatever force was resident there.


Just such a beautiful spot.


Bradleys Head light.



Kookaburra was not sitting in an old gum tree.



We reluctantly left Bradleys Head and went on to Manly.


We had a nice lunch here.


This photo is not one to click on. It is terribly bad, but what a monster of a tree.


I had mentioned to Victor that I would like to see Fairfax Lookout. He had no idea where it was and nor did any of his friends. It was worked out that where I wanted to go was North Head, that is the northern side of the entrance to Sydney Harbour. Looking at South Head.



Black bull rushes. Interesting.


We went on to the old Quarantine Station. We had to be driven down to the site in a mini bus. Doesn't this little beach look so fabulous.


Things were moved around at the Quarantine Station by trains.



Oh, could this be an inclusion for an updated Loos with a View by Red Nomad?


Now, there was a discussion about whether this was a regular Sydney Ferry service or not and I don't remember the outcome.



The quarantine station was a place to isolate foreigners who arrived, in early days. Those with infectious diseases, Cyclone Tracy victims, and the Vietnamese War baby orphan lift babies. You could not help but feel some sadness. Victor as a government employee visited the quarantine station in an official capacity often.







Pile your luggage onto trains that will ride into these autoclaves. Your luggage will be steam heated by the boiler to 46 degrees, 115 for you foreign folk, and all nasties will be killed.


These are called the funicular stairs as once a funicular travelled up the steep hill.


The boiler chimney. It was very quiet with few people around. We knew the site offers accommodation, but no one was staying. There was a decent sized restaurant. We waited for quite some time for the mini bus to return to collect us, and then we found where all the people were, sprinkled all over the large site. There were holidaying people along with two day work conference people. It hosts weddings etc. Quite interesting. You can see some more here.



We headed back to our hotel by going under Sydney Harbour in a tunnel. It had been a lovely day out. Once again we went down the steep hill for dinner and ate at Bill and Toni's Italian restaurant.

There, I managed to finish this before we left for the wedding. Bye.

31 comments:

  1. I do love the people we find in the blogosphere (and sometimes they move into our lives too).
    Thank you for the Sydney tour.
    Enjoy the wedding.

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    1. Indeed EC. 3 hours till the wedding. It should be good.

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  2. It is so good to meet fellow bloggers especially when they give up their spare time. An interesting part of Sydney especially quarantine island. Hope the wedding goes well.

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    1. As you kindly did for us, Marie. Thanks.

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  3. It was a lovely day and my pleasure to spend it with you and R, Andrew.

    My recollection is that we were told the ferry we saw stopping at the jetty for the Quarantine Station does so on an hourly basis but it is the private Manly ferry service stopping there not the State Government Manly ferry service.

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    1. Thanks Victor. The gap is filled in.

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  4. If a family lived on the edge of the harbour, they would have no front and back yard to play footy in, but ohhhhh that view!!!

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    1. Hels, they might have some land away from the water's edge. I can assure you, you never tire of a good view.

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  5. Nice photos :)
    Perhaps the brush turkeys could be harvested for Christmas lunches for the homeless?

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    1. Start plucking River.

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  6. Thanks, as usual, for such lovely photos Andrew.

    Funny, up here in Brissie we call them either bush or scrub turkeys. I've never heard them called brush turkeys before. Makes me wonder if they have other names in other bits of Oz.

    And River, one of my cousins was fed "turkey" for Christmas Dinner out bush many years ago, and he said it was so tough it was absolutely inedible. Yep, it was scrub turkey. Apart from it being against the law to feed it to anybody, it would be cruel and inhuman to feed the things to the homeless.;-)

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    1. Rozzie, I did check about the name as I couldn't remember. All three are names are used. So many of our native animals are inedible, which is just as well for them.

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  7. You certainly got out and about while in Sydney, making the most of your visit...and we are the lucky beneficiaries...thanks for sharing. :)

    Bush turkeys are regulars here on the hill...and the jacarandas are out in full display...I love them. :)

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    1. Lee, I think jacarandas do best in your part of the country. They seem to be very adaptable trees.

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  8. Oh...it seems we overlapped in our visits to Sydney. I was there on Wednesday and Thursday. Sadly, I didn't see much of the city as I was there for work. I did go over the Harbour Bridge on my way back to the airport though....such a magnificent view! The Yarra isn't quite the same.

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    1. AdRad, would it not have been amazing if we ran into each other. Yes, the Yarra is not quite the same and I've never seen it look blue.

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    2. It's a pity we missed an opportunity for the four of us to get together. Another time hopefully.

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    3. That would have been good, Victor.

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  9. I had never heard of a Brush turkey before, nor had I heard of any of those places you visited. They've been added to my list of things to visit one day on future visits to Sydney. How lovely of Victor to have taken time to show you his city.

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    1. Sami, he did the same a couple of years ago. He is very hospitable. I don't know if you have those birds in your state. I don't think we have them in ours.

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  10. Well done Andrew, that was a substantial post! You can put up as many pics of the harbour bridge as you like, I never get tired of seeing it,as for the Opera House eh! I'm not so bothered 😀

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    1. Grace, there is so much beauty around the harbour shores. Aside from the Blue Mountains, no tourist map ever goes west of Newtown.

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  11. Very interesting post. Difficult for people when natives call in to visit they do make a mess, thank goodness we don't have them in our small city.
    Wonderful to meet a blogger someone you may have never met if you didn't have a blog.
    Thermos, Long time since i've heard of one.
    Wedding over now so hope it all went well.

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    1. Margaret, we have met Victor a few times, a friendship formed from blog connection. Whatever happened to the Thermos company. I used it as a generic term. The wedding was amazing. Stay tuned.

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  12. Nice to see Sydney through the eyes of visitors. We take a lot for granted when living here.

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    1. Allan, bearing in mind we did go west to the 'burbs. The nice part of Sydney, both north and south of the harbour, is just magical.

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    2. I meant we did not go west to the 'burbs.

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  13. wow, a luggage autoclave. Not such a bad idea I suppose. Some very beautiful little beaches you have photographed. Did you spend any time lounging around on them? They seemed to be empty of people in the photos. We have herds, packs, flocks, probably flocks would be the term, of wild turkeys roaming, mostly in rural areas but sometimes they overcome neighborhoods. They're huge and people do hunt and eat them, but they are very tough, I am told. Someone hit one once and a friend saw it and the dead bird and brought it to me so the body would not be wasted. I cooked it for the cats.

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    1. Strayer, no, I am not really a beach person. We were there on weekdays. Some popular beaches like at Manly and Bondi can become very crowded. I think I knew more about your wild turkeys than I did about our own brush turkeys.

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  14. I remember the first time I crossed the SHB by train on the North Shore line - I couldn't believe the other commuters weren't as awestruck as I was!!! And ANY loo on the harbour has GOT to be considered for Aussie Loos: Number Twos!!! Just tell me EXACTLY where it was??!!

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    1. Red, although crossing the bridge by train was on my list, it didn't happen. Next time. The loo is at Quarantine Station Wharf.

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