Sunday, October 01, 2017

The view to the north

Well, we don't have a view to the north from home. Swanston Street is the central spine of Melbourne. It is said to be the busiest tram street in the world, with eight trams routes using the street. It is also the street for demonstrations and the two are not compatible. People demonstrate, trams get diverted and or turned back before they get to Swanston Street. It is very inconvenient, but people should be allowed to demonstrate.

Look south down Swanston Street and in the distance is the Shrine of Remembrance to honour the war dead, built on a constructed hill post WW I. Looking to the north was the old iconic Carlton & United Breweries. Most of the brewery was demolished and for many years the site stood empty.

Eventually a building went up and it is now what you see when you look up Swanston Street. It is as fugly as it could possibly be. If we weren't directly told, we were certainly given the impression that the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology Design Hub would be environmentally sound, with these discs about thirty centimetres thick that would adjust themselves, that is move up or down depending on  the sun and the need for heat or cooling within the building.

They did nothing and remained static and we had been sold a lie, until they became very unstatic and began to fall off. It is a horrid building on a prime site at the end of our most important city axis.

I can't remember if it was Labor or Liberals in power at the time when it was approved. Maybe the approval lies at the feet of City of Melbourne or the evil VCAT, but I would be all for my taxes being spent demolishing the building and starting again. Scaffolding now surround the five year old building and protected walkways have been built at the base. The building behind is a bit interesting but it's very terribly hard to take a good photo. I will stand in the middle of tram tracks one day and see what I can do.

Later edit: The building is not really visible until you reach the top of Swanston Street. The building to the left is more visible, but something seems to be going up in front of that.


21 comments:

  1. Sigh on the scaffolding. And a bigger sigh for the need for it to be put in place.
    The smidgeon I could see of the building behind does look interesting. I hope you can get a better photo - but take care.

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    1. EC, the best photo of the building behind would be taken from a building somewhere south. I might 'borrow' someone's photo in addition to taking my own.

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  2. How weird! And how ugly!

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    1. Lee, you don't want to think about it for a minute? I've have never heard anyone praise the exterior.

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    2. I don't need another minute to think about my response, Andrew. I thought it quite clear and precise. You still haven't heard anyone praise the exterior...not words of praise from me, anyway.

      I'm a little confused that you misunderstood my comment...I thought it very clear...concise and precise.

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    3. Sorry. Poor attempt at humour on my part. It is the kind of building that is instantly unlikable. Sometimes it is worth thinking and taking time but this one is not even worth that. (Written on my phone. Hopefully makes sense)

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    4. Blame me, Andrew! My mind is in dull Sunday mode! :)

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  3. I must look next time we are in. How far up the road is it?
    Trouble is we are so intent on 'doing things' we never look up. So thank you for doing it for us Andrew ��

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    1. Thanks Cathy. The building is the corner of Swanston and Victoria Streets.

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  4. Some times it's best to stick with tradition and build from bricks, windows, and tiles. Too many architects are out on an ego trip, and hardly seem to know what they're doing.

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    1. Cro, it seems they don't know what they are doing when bits fall off.

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  5. So I clicked on the 'fugly' link thinking t would take me to a picture of the building...(*~*), next time I'll just keep scrolling down. I don't hear "fugly" much these days, which is probably a good thing.

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    1. River, I thought it sounded a bit of an innocent word.

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    2. Innocent enough when used to describe really ugly things, but I heard it often used by young men to describe girls they didn't like for some reason. Perhaps simply because the girls had refused their advances.

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    3. I never thought of that, and yes, it has been used like that. I see a lot of young men who aren't like that, but I am sure that element still exists in some places. Probably the same elements that will rant about poofs getting married.

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  6. I don't think I've ever seen an attractive Institute of Technology building Andrew, ours certainly isn't.. Fugly... I love it and am going to use it, merci beaucoup! ☺

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    1. Grace, oh we have worse than that one. I thin your are right.

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  7. P.s. you know they weren't my legs on the blog today.. lovely, lovely lady she was but those shoes were hideous 😀😀😀

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    1. They are quite tall shoes. I don't mind them, but think of your old age when choosing shoes.

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  8. Ha ha I didn't realise that the bits were falling off! We build such nasty rubbish in this town. In 100 years it will all be replaced with more rubbish!

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    1. Fen, 100 years is extreme optimism. We are replacing 1990s buildings already. As you would know, it is not something that is generally done in England and Europe.

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