Sunday, September 24, 2017

A drive to the hills

The car satellite navigation system certainly did not take us the way we would have otherwise gone. I expect there may have been some operator error in the input. Nevertheless, it was a pretty route along back roads and streets up into the Dandenong Ranges and to Grants Picnic Ground.

It depends on the time of the year perhaps, and other factors unknown to me, but sometimes there are rosellas to feed but this time, it was the sulphur crested cockatoos dominating, with a few corellas getting a bit of share.

The birds are only allowed to be fed within a paved and fenced area and by seed bought at the gift shop. As the ground is within a state park, the site must have an exemption for bird feeding. Only a certain amount of seed is allowed to be sold each day. We found an area not viewed by the cafe and giftshop and fed a few cockies a bit of the seed we had brought along. 


En masse in a dying tree. I would guess the birds brought about the tree's demise.


We had a Devonshire Tea for lunch, which was quite expensive and the scones while very tasty, were so crumbly it was hard to get the jam and cream on without them collapsing into crumbs. I had been looking around for a rubbish bin outside before realising it was a state park, and so no rubbish bins in state parks. You take your rubbish home with you. R remembers when the cafe and giftshop weren't there, just a small kiosk with two elderly ladies who had an urn to make tea and an oven to whip up delicious scones and for a charge of only a few dollars.

The weather was damp, a bit windy and cold so, as Mount Dandenong was only 15 minutes away, we reprogrammed the sat nav which took us another scenic route to Mount Dandenong. It was even colder and windier on the exposed mountain. The city can be seen in the distance but visibility was not great.


We must go back on a nicer day as it is delightful place. At one time it was all very run down and rather squalid, but not now. There are many areas to stroll, along with a maze to get lost in.








I suppose these television broadcast towers are still in use. On a clear day we can see them from home. There are three that I know of.




Helleborus or if you prefer, winter roses or Christmas roses. I think every place we have lived in we had them growing in a shady spot.



Beds of elephants ears and a late prunus?


We smelt the daphne before we saw it. There were both pink and white.


This looks like what I call Pieris but I have only ever seen it in white. We had a white one somewhere. I also thought it was known as lily of the valley, but it seems I am wrong about that.


Worth a click to enlarge and see what has been carved into the timber. 


We decided we'd had enough of the weather and so headed for home via another rather odd route. I had it with sat navs. They are ok if you can't read a map, but I am going back to my old way of getting around. Once home, I had to look at the electric map on the desktop monitor to see where we had actually been, as I had no idea at times.

16 comments:

  1. It does look like a delightful outing - even in less than ideal weather.
    Love that carved stump. Sat nav frequently does my head in. Whenever possible we avoid it.

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    1. EC, sat nav seems not so bad for inner city driving, but then I already know the wa.

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  2. The sat navs do take you on very odd ways mostly longer than you would normally go.
    Lovely carved stump.
    Food in places to do with the government is always costly we take our own now or buy mac's on the way home.
    Merle.........

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    1. Merle, our sat nav always does the fastest route. The fastest route may not always be the best way to go. Sandwiches and a thermos, is it? I bet more often Maccas on the way home.

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  3. I never know where I am! Perhaps I have a personal person sat nav! ;)

    The trip you did sounds lovely; and to see it in that particular light (or lack thereof), and then at a later date on a clear sunny day you will have experienced the best of both.

    Have a good week, Andrew. :)

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    1. Lee, it is an area we are quite familiar with and have seen it in summer too. Thanks.

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  4. I do really like the carved stump. The more of these the better I reckon. It is a great way to make a sculpture.

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    1. CM, I have a feeling from a former visit, it is carved into the trunk of an important tree. I will check next time.

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  5. I loved the carved tree, a much better idea than just ripping out the stump and leaving a gaping space.

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    1. River, the tree may have grown there or the carved sculpture put there. No matter. It is quite good.

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  6. Sat Nav's don't you just love them.......... It looks like an interesting drive pity about the weather.

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    1. Diane, the weather was at least better than when you were last here.

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  7. What a very pleasant way to spend the day Andrew, I'm a big fan of Devonshire teas, even if they are crumbly 😀 I still use a map book to get to 'never been to before destinations'!

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    1. Grace, yes, maps are best, but combining both can work at times, but other times not.

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  8. Wow, not too far from you, seems like a great place to spend time. I hate crumbly scones.

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    1. Stayer, as often happens, it seemed to take much longer to get home than to get there, but yes, not too far.

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