Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Media studies for children

Little Jo goes to a very good public (government funded) primary school. In a couple of years when she turns twelve, she will go to a secondary school, probably called a college, but in my experience and many of my older Australian readers, it was known as a high school.

While Sister and myself would agree that we would like government funded secondary education to be first class, I expect Little Jo will go to a private school. Private secondary education is on the increase in Australia and while I don't like the privilege it is supposed to bestow, and nor do I particularly believe that is so every case. Such is the state of our education system. I endorse Little Jo being educated by a private school. No one more than me has a troubled conscience over that. It goes against everything I believe in about what is good for society.

Sister went to a public school, Bone Doctor to a private school. Sister's mother was on a deserted wives' pension, with Sister's father paying maintenance for his children until they turned a certain age. Was it 16? Bone Doctor's father was a doctor, her mother is a nurse. Bone Doctor's parents paid for her higher education. Sister worked washing dishes and as a bank teller to pay for her living expenses and I expect her tertiary education was 'free'. She was the only ambitious child of our our parents.

Little Jo's secondary education will cost a couple of thousand dollars in the early years but may well increase to $10,000 plus in her final years. Plus extras. Sister and Bone Doctor can afford this and Little Jo will never go without. (she does go without sugary drinks though, and chocolate biscuits, but is secretly fed naughty food by her Nanny and R).

Little Jo's Mothers' are both clever and well educated, just perhaps lacking in close personal people skills. R will earbash you on this for an hour or two. Little Jo is almost a copy of her bio mother, Sister. We think we know who her bio father is and he too is very clever, as is her bio father's wife. Bone Doctor is ever so practical.

There are plenty of good private schools on the Bellarine Peninsular where Little Jo lives. There is not known to me any great secondary government schools in her area. There isn't a McKinnon High or Glen Waverley Secondary College.  There is a government funded secondary school for high achieving girls in Melbourne near us and I am sure Little Jo would qualify, but from what I observe, Anglo Saxon children are not welcome. Maybe it is because the parents of Anglo Saxon heritage kids can afford to send their children to private schools, whereas our immigrant population pressure their children to achieve and get admittance to the posh government school.

Lordy, did what I was going to post about get so totally lost. There are so many crushes on the school curriculum and most with great value, but so many are motherhood classes. In my opinion schools should step back from educating children about what parents should be educating their children, about important things in life. Life matters, if you like. That creates some space for.........media studies.

Children need to be taught about the manipulative media and to view it with great cynicism. They need to know how advertising works. They don't need to be taught about how to use the internet. They will know that already. Sadly in these days, they need to be taught great cynicism.

You may recall me being a little upset when Little Jo told me, 'You need my mothers'(sic) permission before you take my photo. As I write this, she was not so smart mouthed about photos being taken of her today, a few Sundays ago at Anakie Fairy Park. But if it is her and her parents wish for her not to appear on Facebook, so be it. I will share photos of other nieces and great nieces.

At what age do children get personal phones? They have probably played with their parents' phone from a youngish age.

I found this newspaper article below interesting. I reckon from the age of thirteen I would be outraged to know that my parents could spy on me personally and what I was doing on my phone, had I a personal phone back then, I expect I would looking at gay pornography and looking for men to put into practice what I had seen. And, I expect I would not have turned out any differently to what I am. I think by the age of thirteen, I had already bought my first soft porn gay magazine, and cut out pictures from clothing catalogues of men in underwear, probably Bonds.

No photos at a school swimming gala? At times I do understand why people do say, political correctness gone mad.

Bugger orf parents. You are not spying on this 13 year old me's phone and what I do with it.

It relies on students downloading a tamper-proof phone app, and a portal lets parents see what sites, messages and apps children are accessing. Schools and parents can deactivate the phone's cameras and a sleep timer bars students from accessing the internet at bedtime.
"If the school is having a school swimming gala they don't necessarily want kids taking photos and posting those photos," Mr Smyth said.
Marist College Bendigo decided to roll out the technology after fielding calls from parents who wanted more control over their children's phones.

21 comments:

  1. Growing up in a NSW country town, and then arriving firstly in Brisbane, the thing about public/private schools always surprised me. I went to my local primary and then high school and received, I think an excellent education. Though we had some local Catholic schools, and a Catholic boys boarding school, I don't remember anyone particularly spectacular coming out of those schools. Simon Baker-Denny is probably the only one I can think of who did. So yes, for me, the private/public thing has always been a surprise. As a working class boy from the bush, I was more than happy with my local public funded school, and think I've done okay.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. James, but would you be if you were now educated in the public system. I agree, when you and I, not that you are as old as me, state education was quite good. Catholic schools were only an alternative then, not better.

      Delete
    2. I suspect if I was in a country town, there would still be little difference, based on the experience of younger family living there still. I don't have any younger family living in Sydney, so I'm not sure about capital city experience.

      Delete
  2. My education was all in public schools.
    Political correctness is a fraught area for me. Used as defined 'the avoidance of forms of expression or action that are perceived to exclude, marginalize, or insult groups of people who are socially disadvantaged or discriminated against' I have absolutely no problem with it. Sometimes it gets stretched a little - but what doesn't.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, which is what I was trying to say in a previous post about political correctness. The definition is fine, but when it goes beyond that, it becomes a problem. You too are of a similar age and ditto, state education was fine then and I am not even saying it is bad now.

      Delete
  3. Anonymous7:38 am

    I'd be wary of any private school that insists on religious indoctrination. Often they go hand in hand. No chocolate biscuits? I'm waiting for some outraged clown somewhere (hopefully not among your readers) to insist this amounts to child abuse.
    Just going off on a tangent, I think any parent who allows their child to be kissed/cuddled by a politicians during an election campaign should be charged with child abuse. Especially if it's by the Prime Minister in Exile, T Abbott. Surely the child would be scarred for life. - Ian

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ian, generally I think religious private schools are quite soft on RE. They know if they are hard nosed about RE, the will lack students. Sister has softened a bit on 'naughty food' but the results of being harsh in Little Jo's early years has given results so far as food goes.......technology, not so much. The horror of being breather on by Abbott with his breath stinking of last night's wine is unimaginable.

      Delete
  4. Being old I can remember the telephone hub in Bourke or Collins street. I would spend hours there on those calls I didn't want my parents to hear since the home phone seemed to always be in the range of every ear in the house. But those were the days when I could walk a mile or so after getting off the last train at midnight and never worry about it. Wouldn't do it these days without a mobile phone with my finger on the 000 number.
    Times change, my high school was considered the St.Trinian's of the area and now they fight to get on the waiting list for a rather posh sounding Secondary College.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jah Teh, were you having naughty chats with your boyfriends? I really don't know if the risk to personal safety on the streets is greater now, perhaps it is. It rather depends on the area. I tried, but I cannot guess which school that was. Funnily I was reading an old post of mine the other day and you are rather learned about St Trinians.

      Delete
  5. Private or public, parents should simply look for the best possible education available. Decent private schools in the UK cost around £30,000 pa; $10,000 sounds very reasonable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cro, the problem I have is that the more (working class) children who go to private schools, and they are, the less appealing state schools become. It is chicken and egg and because of huge government subsidies to private schools they are recruiting from the state sector heavily, even taking in for free the very brightest. I see in England private schools are kicking out the less bright students.

      Delete
  6. Motherhood classes??who is taking these? The mothers or the kids?
    My education, what little there was of it, was all in public schools.
    Thinking back to when I was thirteen, I was a child and did childish things, playing on the beach and reading books, climbing trees. I may have been different if I'd lived with mum, but such thoughts worry me. After all, when I was a mere 17, her dearest wish was to see me married off.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, it is a word play on the question whether motherhood is a good thing or not. There is only one answer. I don't know how state schools back then turned out far more literate students than they do now.

      Delete
    2. Rote learning, attention to detail and Friday morning tests, spelling, dictation and and whatever math had been learned Monday to Thursday. It was an excellent way for the teacher to know if we'd learned and which students were struggling.

      Delete
    3. Basic educational curriculum without all the added extras they have now. I think it should go back to the basics for at least the first three years, so children can at least read and write (legibly) and have good math skills by age eight. Then bring in the extras, just not all at once. I would agree computer skills are necessary these days, but how many kids already have computers at home anyway? They already have those skills.

      Delete
  7. Here we are divided in K-12, then college. High school is grades 9 through 12. We have kindergartens for five year olds. We have grade school, middle school, high school then college. But college costs any student a great deal, over $15k a year, probably way more by now, even though public. It's free to go kindergarten through high school but even though the infrastructure of college is state paid, tuition is very very high and out of reach for many many students.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, that sounds like your college is equivalent to our university, where you go attend after 12 years of school.

      Delete
  8. My two did go to private secondary school Andrew, don't judge me :) NOT Catholic. I'm not sure they got a better education but they certainly didn't have as much peer pressure and I guess that made me feel better :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, and what I did not mention was that some do really well in state schools and some in private schools. People who can afford it nowadays do send their children to private schools.

      Delete
  9. My mother and grandmother would've been very bored if they'd wasted their time spying on me when I was 13. Move along...nothing going on here!

    But, in those days when I was the tender age of 13 I was just 13...still an innocent kid doing innocent kid things. Life and kids...and what is available to them at their fingertips is a whole lot different...it's a whole new world.

    I'm glad I was a kid at the time it was when I was a kid!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee, your youthful saintlyhood becomes you well. So what happened later :-P I agree with you. I would not want to be a teenager now. It seems like hard work, to me.

      Delete