Thursday, June 08, 2017

Europe 17 Day 16

Have you ever heard of Katakolon? Me either. Our reason for visiting is that it is the nearest seaside town to Olympia, home to Olympic Games 8thC BC to 4thC AD. Now that is history.



At times the final 'n' is dropped from the name.


It is only a very small town, with three and a half streets parallel to the sea, but with two ships in and not everyone, including us, going to see the ruins at Olympia, it was very busy. We are not so interested in ancient ruins, getting close to becoming some ourselves.


A bit creepy.


I've seen a public beer bike elsewhere, maybe Amsterdam


The centre has a bench where the beers are poured and placed for people to drink as they pedal.


Getting around by more conventional means. I think it was quite hot for the horse to stand in the open.



We found a cafe for coffee and some wifi, then had a wander in the streets.


Then it was time for lunch and a drink. We all sat down and adjacent to us on a bench were some very dark skinned youth. R sat down and a loud crack sounded. The seat had obviously broken under the cushion and the lads were in hysterics. We were laughing too. R just sat there in momentary shock. One of the lads asked R if he was ok, and of course he was. He spoke near perfect English, but when they resumed their conversation between themselves, it sounded like they were speaking Spanish. It was a nice moment of humour and friendliness.


Bougainvillea is very popular in Greece.


Could almost be Australia. There was one matter I noticed, that the Greek men looked very Greek. Of course they would, but I was a little surprised that they were so physically stereotypical and readily identifiable as Greek.



It was quite a pretty little village with nice food and wine, but our ship awaited us.


13 comments:

  1. I love some of the Greek architecture. I've got a great coffee table book filled with glossy photographs of Greek homes etc....love, love, love it!

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    1. Name and author of book please? Does it show interiors too?

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    2. Lee, I certainly like the exterior of the Greek housing I saw.

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  2. I wish I was there right now to escape the winter cold and rain.

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    1. Any you in Sydney Jim. What about us poor souls down south.

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  3. There is a very distinct look to Greek men and some of the women too. I've worked with Italian and Greek women and always knew which was which. I think it's the smile in the eyes. They're born happy.
    I like that cute little white house with the red roof.

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    1. River, yes, like those in Portugal and Spain, Greeks seem to be happy people. It is not a grand house, but I think it would be very nice to live in, and a pretty good location.

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  4. Loads of history Andrew.
    Had a laugh about the seat, was good that everyone laughed.
    Greeks are Greek no matter where they are - they the ones that came to Tasmania from Greece, always looked very Greek as did the Italians.
    I should imagine being in a smaller town one would get the 'feel' of the country.

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    1. Margaret, the small place was so overwhelmed by tourists, it was hard to see who actually lived there. The town had a good feel to it.

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  5. I hadn't heard of the town - so thank you. And yes, there does seem to be something about the Greeks which is readily identifiable.
    Glad that R was ok. The funny moment could have been awful.

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    1. EC, I suppose it could have been a total chair collapse with a back injury, but it wasn't and it was funny.

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  6. This looks like an interesting small town to visit.

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    1. Sami, its small size made it very pleasant.

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