Sunday, June 04, 2017

Europe 17 Day 13

R had a mental block about the name of our stateroom steward. He simply could never remember his name. When we boarded we had a double bed. We were gathering strength to complain but when we returned to our stateroom, their word not mine. For mine it was a ship cabin. (Unrecoverable sentence destruction.) His name was Fidel, so I told R to think of Fidel Castro. I am sure at least once I heard R call him Castro. Fidel sawed the beds into halves, just as happened in Lisbon. The only personal tipping we did was give him €5 in advance. It was euros well spent. Both R and myself are hot in bed, so we asked him to remove the bedding and just leave us a sheet, and he did.



Ah, mon chapeau is featured.




After the overnight journey, we arrived in Marseilles. Added to our shipboard account was bus transport to the 'town'. Touts were about and in force as we left the ship and knowing what we now know, we should have had used them and not paid the high price our ship charged us to simply get us to town.


There were sights to be seen in Marseilles.








In spite of wearing a hat, I got a little sunburn as we lunched outdoors with the throngs.



The old V for U. I Clavdivs, I used to enjoy saying.




This was not an auspicious start to our cruise. I have painted Lisbon, Porto and Barcelona in a very favourable manner, but I did not like Marseilles at all. I can't explain my feelings any more than that there was a bad vibe in air. I simply did not like it at all and I was relieved to leave on the bus and get back to the ship.

Bye Marseilles. No doubt you had qualities I did not discover.


25 comments:

  1. Andrew I thin it is another place worth visiting

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  2. The city look popular with tourists and crowded

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    1. Gosia, it is clearly popular with many people.

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  3. Some places are like that. Just as some people are like that. I tend to trust my gut too.
    The view departing Marseilles looked lovely - which is no doubt how you felt.

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    1. EC, haha. As above, it was just me I think, although R wasn't so keen either.

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  4. Word association can get one into a lot of trouble at times. My ex believed in using it and it caused him embarrassment one day. At the time he was a real estate agent in Brisbane working for an agency before we began our own a couple of years later. He had a new client due to arrive from out of town somewhere. The client's name was "Mr. Trigger"....and, of course, come the day of the designated meeting, when the gentleman walked up to my ex's desk, my ex called him "Mr. Gun"!!

    You made some wonderful memories during your trip, Andrew...again, thanks for sharing them with us. :)

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    1. Haha Lee, re Mr Gun. There was a guy at work whose name I could never remember, Troy. I decided word association was the way to remember, Helen of Troy. You guessed it. I once called him Helen. Thanks for reading and commenting. Feedback is always nice.

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  5. Marseilles has a very high Arabic population, and it does tend to give it a certain 'air'. I've only been once when I stayed in the central 'Mental Asylum'; my friend's father was the chief Psychiatrist.

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    1. Cro, I can't say I noticed the ethnicity of people, but you describe it will. There seemed to me an unseen malevolence in the air. That must have been 'interesting' in an asylum.

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  6. Was wondering where the footpath is where people are having 'eats'! Strange how when visiting a place you get the feeling of not wanting to be there.

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    1. Margaret, there was quite a lot of open space, squares etc, as there are in most European cities, which makes them very nice places to be.

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  7. Interesting feelings about Marseilles. One place that I haven't been, so it doesn't look like I missed much. So you and R are hot in bed, we needed to know that.

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    1. Diane, I suppose the ship only went there because it could and everyone has heard of Marseilles. Strangely as I get older, I get hotter in bed. Late onset male menopause, perhaps.

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  8. It's a shame you didn't like Marseilles, but not everyone can like everyplace and you have wonderful memories of the other areas you've been.
    I like that two story merry-go-round very much.

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    1. River, the merry-go-round was a ripper. We liked everywhere else we went.

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  9. I have not been reading anyone's posts for ages, no idea what is taking up my time. I have just read through all your trip posts and looking forward to more.
    We are thinking of Spain and Portugal for the winter so you are giving me lots of pointers.

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    1. Jackie, both great countries to visit.

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  10. We'll be going to Marseilles for 4 or 5 days in September, as my son in law's parents who are French live there and they are always asking us to visit. My daughter says it can be a "dangerous" place, very high crime rate.

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    1. Sami, I guess being an old port town, it has its history which may be relevant to today. I'm sure you will write about it and I will read with great interest about how you like the town. It is probably a bit different when you are hosted and shown the sights.

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  11. Well that's quite a definite reaction Andrew, you can't pinpoint what it was that you weren't keen on? I actually felt the same about Rome, did nothing for me!

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    1. Grace, I expect it was everything mentioned by other people above. I just didn't like the vibe.

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  12. I just read the wiki on Marseilles. Most of it was written in 2011 such as the breakdown of religions in the city. 405,000 Catholics, 200,000 Muslim, and by now, maybe more are Muslim. Maybe that gave you the ominous feeling of it? Otherwise, from what I read, seems like a cultural and industrial center of France with 90% of all businesses small, with less than 500 employees, with a tilt now to more high tech industry. I sound like a wiki repeater now.

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    1. Strayer, that is all interesting to learn. I am very surprised that half the population is Muslim, and as you say, maybe there are more now.

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  13. ha ha ha I used to say Clavdivs too!!

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    1. Fen, we are so literal.

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