Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Europe 17 Day 2 Dubai

Oh, we missed Saturday Lazy Lunch at Granny's House.


We headed for the nearby metro station, about a fifteen minute walk. Dubai is a very hot place but at this time of the year it was a bearable 30 degrees. The station was air conditioned too. Rather than mess with a ticket machine, we bought tickets from a window and travelled on the Green Line from Union to Al Fahidi. We had a look around a couple of shops and bought an ice cream and headed back to the hotel. On the way no one offered us a seat on the train and I was all set to rant about the local people not being kind. No sooner were we on the train returning, than two lads offered us their seats. We had set out to find 'the soul' of Dubai. If it has one, we missed it.




The metro stations and trains were spotless and we thought the metro system was brand new. It is in fact six years old. There wasn't really any litter at all in Dubai........except for these cards dropped around in the streets. There is just a phone number and a photo. Somehow I don't think they are hairdressers.


A massive desalination plant supplies the UAE with water, and this keeps things green.



The metro stations all look like this one.


We were picked up for our 'New Dubai' city tour in the afternoon. We didn't see any trace of old Dubai. The first stop was the Dubai Mall, the largest shopping centre in the world and by golly, it was big. We were given about half an hour to wander and the time passed quickly.


There was a massive aquarium, free to view.


All the top stores, and the lesser ones too, such as Marks and Spencers and C&A.


We were very impressed with this water feature, as was everyone by the number of shutter snappers.



Massive television screen above an ice skating rink. In the centre of the screen are restaurants and cafes.



Not sure how a Morris Minor would go in the heat of Dubai.





We headed southwards to those large man made palm frond constructions in the sea. We stopped at Dubai Marina. Along the edge of the water were many restaurants and cafes. It would be a great place to dine in the evening once things cooled down. Three blonde women were sitting at a cafe smoking hookahs.



This flyover is supported by fake tree trunks, with fake foliage on the underside of the flyover.


Apparently this is something special. Our guide was a heavily accented Moroccan born who had lived in Dubai for a long time. The sound system in the minibus was playing up so missed some of what he said.


I've not seen a pink frangipani before.


It  looks expensive.


See a bit in the distance a palm tree that is fake and hold mobile phone transmitters.


Another important building.


For the kiddies.


So many interesting and varied building designs.


We were taken back to our hotel by 6pm, just in time for the alcohol curfew to be lifted. We had a refreshing swim in the pool and then some cod and chips in the Chelsea Pub, and very good it was. It was an early night as our flight to Lisbon was at 7:30am.


25 comments:

  1. Everything just looks so new. Where is the old Dubai?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie, the closest to old would be an old style market area. It was only a tiny fishing village until the 60s. We saw nothing old at all.

      Delete
  2. New, plush and upmarket. I would happily visit, but couldn't live in it I don't think. I would feel like a shabby anachronism.
    Loved the acquarium and the water feature.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is that, EC. I am glad we saw it, but one visit is enough. The weather for a start......

      Delete
  3. The Prada shop is gorgeous. But that begs the question - why you didn't see any trace of old Dubai? Where did it go?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hels, the Prada shop looked stunning. I don't think there is any real old area of Dubai, unless it is the market area that I heard about but never found.

      Delete
  4. Looks wonderful and it's odd to me there are no old buildings, but of course there wouldn't be as it's a newish city.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, yes, it is a recently created city. It functions very well, but has no real soul.

      Delete
  5. A good friend of mine lived there for many years and designed some of the more crazy buildings. He used to tell some strange stories!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cro, it seemed to be city where architects could be very adventurous, and they were.

      Delete
  6. We had a pink frangipani tree in the backyard when I was little, so I'm sure they are all over the place here.

    Again, thanks for sharing your photos. It's such a pleasure to see them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rozzie, are you in Sydney? Frangipani can only grow here in Melbourne is special conditions.

      Delete
  7. Andrew, do you really expect to be offered a seat on the train these days or was that just a joke? If you do, (a) by whom? and (b) how often does it actually happen?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marcellous, I don't expect to be offered a seat but I expect R to be offered as seat. But I am often offered a seat here, regularly, by young people and people not that younger than me. I have gotten past being offended because in my mind I am still young. I now happily take the seat if I am travelling some distance.

      Delete
  8. Andrew, I'm in subtropical Brisvegas. Very different from Melbourne. I was foolishly assuming you had ordinary yellow and white onies, but not pink.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, only the very dedicated in Melbourne can grow frangipani, usually white.

      Delete
  9. Is everyone rich there? It's all so upscale.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, I think the citizens are quite comfortable, but they are a small minority of the population.

      Delete
  10. Every time I have flown into and out of Dubai the air above has been heavy smog-like haze. You appear to have experienced nice blue skies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Victor, it was clear. I didn't know it was like that. That is one thing I dislike about large Asian cities.

      Delete
  11. I like the idea of disguising mobile phone towers as trees. I think I'd want a lot more than a half hour in the biggest mall in the world, just so I could say I'd seen everything.
    We have pink frangipani here in Adelaide and red ones too. Next time I see a pink or red one in flower I'll make a note of where it is, so I can take the camera. I've seen a couple of pinky-yellow sunset ones too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, within the mall, aside from the attractions, they were just shops, as you see everywhere. Can your camera capture the scent of the frangipani too?

      Delete
  12. My friend's son worked there for two years and she went twice to Dubai, there is no old town and even if you try to go out in the desert there is nothing typical. It's an artificial town with a lot of Indians who work there as slaves almost !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gattina, from what I observed, you are pretty much right.

      Delete
  13. A city has to have soul Andrew.. my decision not to go there was right then and it has nothing to do with the flying thing 😀😀 Aimee has pink frangipani growing in her garden.

    ReplyDelete