Friday, February 24, 2017

The disgraceful Fair Work Commission

What a disgraceful decision by the Fair Work Commission. The Commission has cut the effective pay of the lowest paid workers by reducing Sunday penalty rates. You can bet the Commissioners did not sit on a Sunday to come up with this outrageous cut to the pay of people who serve us pretty well in my opinion and, are very poorly paid.

This page has a list of the commissioners; a president, two vice presidents and seventeen deputy presidents! Plus the basic commissioners and then even more hangers on to assist. I don't know if they are fat or not, but you can bet these are predominately wealthy middle class white males who made this decision that disadvantages those who are among the poorest paid workers in the country. What sort of conscience do they have? How do they sleep at night?

The President of the so called Fair Work Commission, Justice Iain Ross AO.


The spineless Labor Party said in advance they will respect the decision of the Commission. What? The workers' party, the political wing of the union movement respects the decision to cut workers pay?

The result of the constant attack on workers pay and rights by conservative forces and capital may not be felt in the short term but it will result in a very fractured society. It makes me ashamed of my country.

20 comments:

  1. I am so sick of the decisions made my these fat b*stards. And by fat I mean their pay packets. They don't have to worry about where their next dollar may come from. It makes me seethe with rage that once again, the underprivileged, young and poor are being made to pay. When I was studying I relied on my Sunday shift. It meant I didn't have to work so much that my studies suffered. These middle aged prats have no idea what it's like. None whatsoever.

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    1. Fen, I am just furious as you. No doubt most came from comfortable families and were university educated for free under Whitlam.

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  2. They do seem to care not one single bit about anyone but themselves.
    I'm wondering how much these lowest paid workers do earn, if you know could you tell me?
    I know penalty rates are much sought after by those who work on weekends and holidays, but if penalty rates are cut, the bosses would be able to keep their establishments open longer hours and then the workers would make up the difference by working the extra hours?
    I'm not sure I'm making sense here, I do know that I never bothered much about penalty rates apart from that one time I volunteered to work NYE because I needed the money to help out a family member.

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    1. River, I don't actually know, but somewhere just under $20 per hour, up to $28 for casuals. Umm, dear staff, you can keep the same pay, you just have to work another hour or so longer to earn it. Why should our lowest paid be attacked like that?

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    2. I've heard casual rates are to stay the same as they were, no change there and most penalty rate workers are casual staff.

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  3. And now I've read Fenstar's comment and can see her point. I hadn't thought about students who need the time for studying while still wanting a decent wage.

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  4. I disagree with you, Andrew.

    It's about time this happened, in my opinion...now all the unionists are screaming blue murder, but let them! The union reps will still bleed off the workers and dine in the best restaurant6s ordering the best on the menu (I know...I cooked for and served many of them through the years and they felt no guilt whatsoever as they sipped on the best wines)!

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-23/man-with-bill-shorten-decrying-penalty-rate-cuts-alp-member/8298334

    When I was working, for years I worked weekends, day and night, and never got paid penalty rates; nor did I jump up and down demanding them. I didn't go storming the Bastille!

    At $44.00 per hour for a Sunday worker to serve a cup of coffee, lots of cups of coffee have to be sold! Small businesses can't operate under those kinds of rates. And if small businesses go broke...those screaming that they're hard done by won't have a job of any kind, paying them any amount of money!!!

    Things are different these days since the days that weekend penalty rates came in....get over it!!

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    1. Lee, fat cat union leaders are no friend of mine, but a union is important to workers. I am a shift worker. I work many Sundays. I have been out working at night at 3am and out working in the morning at 3am. I miss family and friend gatherings because of shift work. R comes close to smacking me in the face when for us to do anything is always dependent on my shifts. I miss family Christmases. I can change shifts at work, if someone is agreeable and they want my shift. It causes me no end of stress trying to juggle all this, as I am doing about R's and Mother's birthdays this month, never mind our friend's goodbye dinner before she moves to Launceston. Do you think I am not owed some compensation in the way of penalty rates for this? I don't whinge about it, I agreed to it when I started my job, but believe me, without penalty rates, my job that I have done for 38 years would not be worth doing.

      Some cafes and restaurants add 10% for Sunday and public holidays. I am happy to pay the extra to cover penalty rates for staff.

      So the cafe that has to pay workers $44 an hour can stay closed on Sundays. What is wrong with that? No one will die because a cafe is closed.

      But simplifying it, rich white guys have decided that the pay of the lowest paid workers should be cut. There was no mention of an increase in pay, not that that lasts beyond the next payrise.

      I hope we are still friends.

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    2. Of course we're still friends, Andrew. Friends don't have to agree on every single point. That's not how it works...to my way of thinking, anyway.

      I guess I was so used to working six/seven days a week, long hours, split shifts that it was all part and parcel of the job.

      You might be fortunate in missing family Christmases - just joking! :

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    3. Lee, while it is rare, I do confess to at times using work as an excuse to not attend things, but I do love our family Christmases.

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  5. Crazy times and hard for workers

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    1. Gosia, Lech Walesa was no friend of people like me, but at least he stood up for workers.

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  6. Oh for goodness sake. If the business owners resent making x% less profit on Sundays, let them raise the prices of services to Sunday customers by x%.

    Don't attack the workers!!!

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    1. Hels, quite so. We pay more on Sundays to cover higher staffing costs, or it is built into the weekly prices.

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  7. I completely agree with you, Andrew. I worked shift work for over 30 years and always resented those Sunday shifts. And all of those Christmas Days! Do you think for a second any of us would have worked at Christmas if we didn't get paid extra? Not that it was much extra, only time and a half. Maybe it's different now, but in my day the "big three" days of double time and a half were odd - something like Boxing Day, Easter Saturday and something else that escapes my memory.
    Anyway, for those who think we shift workers would work penalty shifts if we didn't have to, think again!

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    1. Rozzie, thanks. However you speak like people have a choice about working unsociable hours. It can be part of your job, or what you choose.

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  8. That's horrible! It goes on here too, like the rich want slaves, a slave labor class, and they make their excuses and get richer themselves. It's criminal and morally bankrupt. They're just theives.

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    1. Strayer, we are headed directly down your road and it is wrong.

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  9. This is just the beginning of getting rid of penalty rates in all sectors, trust me on that.

    The rich get richer the poor get poorer.

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    1. Allan, without a doubt. Although there is no compensatory pay rise in this case, there often is, but it gets eaten up in time and the wage will go back to its relative value at the time penalty rates cease.

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