Monday, February 27, 2017

English politeness and a movie

I walk around the blind corner of a building as someone else does. We almost collide. We both say, sorry and hopefully, I walk to the left and they walk to my right. If not, we may say sorry again to each other as we have misjudged the passing side of travel of the other person.

Even if someone walks into to us, we warn them by saying sorry, not look out. It is all very British, I think. Do American people do that too?

English politeness on the roads is legendary. While one person may have right of way, two car drivers will sit and gesticulate,  you go first, no you go first., no you, please. Meanwhile the traffic behind them banks up. I have seen it and experienced and it was maddening. Even supposedly professional drivers, such as Blackpool tram driver,s do the same. What is the point of road rules? But then British drivers have some to whom they are not polite, buses and cyclists. I was appalled at how R's youngest sister bragged about how she would cut off buses to get to where she going.

I began this post quite some time ago and yet just yesterday it became a bit more salient. R had been given two Gold Class cinema tickets and kindly shouted me to see Lion. It was a terrific movie, even though I had already seen a tv story about the tale of an Indian orphan boy taken on by an Australian family in Hobart, who went on to find his mother back in India. English actor Dev Patel shone in the movie. I forecast him to be one of those actors who just sells movies. If he is in a movie, people will want to see it.

The recently renovated Gold Class cinemas in South Yarra's Jam Factory are superb. They are spacious, with a table between two seats for your food and drinks, pre ordered with staff who greet you and seat you in the lounge before you enter the cinema. The seats are large lounge chairs and recline with the footrest coming out with the press of an electric button. A cavernous space under one armrest stores any bits and pieces you make have with you. When you are brought your food and drinks mid movie, the staff are unobtrusive and kneel or crouch down as they put whatever on your table, so not spoiling anyone's viewing. Not a job for older people. The cost? $84 for two, which was covered by the vouchers. The outrageous $6+ booking fee was not. We have been out at night so rarely of late, thus we justified spending $67 on food and drink.

Dev Patel is rather easy on the eyes, hence a gratuitous photo inserted here.


This is really not how this post was meant to go, talking about a movie, but while R used the toilet as we were leaving I went out into Chapel Street to wait for him and regretting I had not brought tissues and was making do with the high quality paper serviette from the cinema. He came out, I moved and assuming he was next to me but no, it was a young lass walking along the footpath and I had nearly crossed straight in front of her. I said sorry, she said sorry, we moved a bit and again we were on a collision path, sorry I said, sorry she said, and yet even once again we still had not unentangled ourselves, with another set of sorrys. It was totally my fault. Funnily as we walked up Chapel Street to get the tram home, I collided elbows with someone and there were no sorrys as we were moving at fair pace in opposite directions and it was just an accident without any confusion. 

Meanwhile in our ever so polite city, two people have been stabbed in the last 24 hours. 

34 comments:

  1. I saw Lion a week ago, and liked it a lot. Dev Patel IS easy on the eyes, isn't he?! When the movie started one of the women I went with leaned over and whispered "He's incredibly good-looking!" And I had to agree. I also liked the boy who played the young Saroo. And like you, I wish I had brought tissues. I had to soak up the tears on the front of my t-shirt.

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    1. Jennifer, yes the boy who played Saroo was also very good. The tears I could cope with, it was the running nose that caused me trouble. I hope you tee did not have suffer that indignity.

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  2. Replies
    1. Gosia, I think he is now better looking than when he was younger, which is a bit unusual.

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    2. some people "grow into" their faces, Dev was quite young when he did the Exotic Marigold hotel movies, and just a boy in Slumdog Millionaire.

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  3. Anonymous9:31 am

    I'm glad you liked the movie. I'd hate to go to a cinema, get one of those comfy chairs, indulge myself with food and drink then nod off 30 minutes into a dull movie. Especially as I snore loudly when sleeping. - Ian

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    1. Ian, I find the beginning of movies are often drawn out and boring, as in musicals, and so it is good time for some shut eye. Don't care for the snoring though.

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  4. When doing the endless dance of going this way and then that way when accidentally bumping into to someone I usually end up laughing... and then remain still while smiling as I usher them forth - allowing them "right of way". If I don't do that...we could be still going to and fro! :)

    I, too, saw the segment on "Sixty Minutes" on Saroo Brieley's story, the inspiration for "Lion". I don't often watch "Sixty Minutes"...I grew tired of the show years ago, but I was glad I caught that particular one. It's such a moving story and I'm looking forward to seeing the movie.

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    1. Lee, that is what I should have done, but me being at fault, tried to rectify the situation.

      I saw the story on the ABC about a year ago or so, before the movie was finished. The movie certainly dramatised, especially the angst over the search for his mother. I am sure you will enjoy the movie.

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  5. I want to see that movie. Such an outrageously comfortable theater though, have never heard of such a place. The ones here often stink and the seats are jammed together badly and even though the seat rows descend, if a tall person sits in front of you, may be hard to see. People dump their drink and food trash in the rows as they leave, cell phones ring, teenagers scream as do toddlers, and one must sit through, as captive audience, almost half hour of commercials before the real movie begins.

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    1. Strayer, you do pay dearly for the experience of this theatre. I can't say ours stink, there can be sight problems if someone tall sits in front of you, generally people take their rubbish, phones are muted and kids quiet, but of course I see certain types of movies that don't appeal to young people, so that experience might be different. Our normal movie tickets for an adult are about $20, US$15. What are yours?

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  6. Crikey Andrew ..... Mum keeps saying she wants to see that movie. Looks as if I'll have to stay home alone. I hate that. She wouldn't dare go at night though. I'd probably eat the leather lounge if she did that.

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    1. Charlie, your Mum is not so young and I am of a similar age and I am not so keen going out at night either. You would tear around at any old time, I guess.

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  7. Dev Patel is a cutie. I saw Lion here on New Year's Eve, there was a pre-release showing and sister in law V said she'd like to see it and I was there at the time, having just seen another movie with them, so R bought three tickets immediately, in case they sold out. There was free champagne before the showing and people dressed up a bit, R drank my champagne. The movie was very moving and I plan to buy the dvd when it is released. I think little Sunny Pawar who played the young Saroo might have quite a career if he wants to continue in movies.

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    1. River, did you mention that at the time? I can't remember. We will buy the dvd for Mother when it is released. Sunny was good, and probably will have a career in Bollywood.

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  8. My daughter goes Gold Class every time, she is on the large side and prefers a comfortable seat. At the beginning of each year she and her best friend each buy a book of tickets and see several movies a year.

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    1. River, your daughter must be rich! Yes, I did note there are deals on GC. It was very nice. We did go GC with vouchers several years ago, and it is much nicer now.

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    2. It's "credit card rich" so she pays a lot more in the end with interest rates and all that. Sometimes her friend, who is better off, will buy her the book of tickets as a Christmas gift. They've known each other since they were Coles girls together, about 20 years now.

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  9. I am very glad "Manchester by The Sea" won Best Actor (Casey Affleck) and Best Original Screenplay. It was such a sensitive film, I was sure had to have been British.

    Re "Lion", I would have given the Best Supporting Actor to Sunny Pawar who played Young Saroo stunningly. Go River!

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    1. Hels, you are so hip and modern. I've heard of Ben Affleck, but not Casey Affleck. I heard the title mentioned on commercial tv news tonight and wondered if it was Manchester in England and perhaps worth checking out. Btw, a new tram line has just opened in Manchester and there is proposed hideous pair of towers proposed for opposite the town hall. Perhaps you are a bit familiar with Manchester.

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  10. Me and Copperwitch did a Gold Class excursion one time with gin&tonic and cake n stuff. it was wonderful.
    When driving I like to be courteous and helpful wherever possible. Letting people in, or cross the road etc. when traffic has slowed and there is no point in passing them.


    How well must La Kidman have played 'an adoptive mother' eh?

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    1. Annie, courteous driving is good. Braking and stopping on a main road with umpteen cars behind you to give way to someone who is meant to give way to you is not. Of course each situation is different, but as well as being polite, you must also the consider the greater effect of your actions.

      Kidman was ok. Wenham was very nicely restrained and he never overplayed.

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  11. I prefer English drivers over our impatient, pushy, abusive drivers

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    1. Diane, somewhere in between would be good. Inner suburban Melbourne drivers aren't too bad, which is just as well as nothing would move without some good will and give and take.

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  12. I'm with Diane. I prefer English drivers over a good many of ours.
    The theater sounds wondrous, the price not so much, but I'm glad you got to treat yourselves.

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    1. Sandra, it is a nice gift to buy for someone. I wouldn't dream of paying that for myself.

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  13. Well you know I grew up with very colonial manners Andrew, so I'm all about the 'oops sorry' 😊 but I make up for it driving, polite but determined.. actually Perth drivers are generally pretty polite, smaller population maybe!

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    1. Grace, I agree about Perth drivers being polite, although as I often mention, not in Northbridge on a Friday night.

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  14. I believe people are polite here mainly it small town.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, you would have to be in a small town where people know each other.

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  15. Always polite to say sorry if one bumps into someone.
    Loved the movie, tearful though.

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    1. It is on both counts, Margaret.

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  16. I have only attended Gold Class three times and fell asleep during the movie on each occasion. Haven't returned in some years.

    I think Lion is an exceptional film. Remarkable for being a true story, very well told and beautifully acted. The young Indian boy is terrific. I had tears rolling down my face at the end.

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    1. Victor, yesterday I made a comment on your post about Lion but it did not appear. Any movie that can make you cry both happy and sad tears must be good.

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