Friday, February 03, 2017

Dual Nationals

I convinced R to retain his British Euro passport and I am not sure why. Maybe I had dreams of living in England/Europe? Maybe I had dreams of R going back to England and leaving me alone. I really don't approve of dual nationalities. Wasn't the facility only introduced into Australia so that Rupert Murdoch could retain his media empire in Australia and buy a new one in the US, that is he had to be a US citizen to buy into the local media?

While R can could queue jump with his Euro passport when we travelled, it was pointless as he then had to wait for me with my untrusted Aussie passport. Thanks for that Britain, while all those other foreign types who can't speak English and whose forebears did not send you food parcels during the war, go through as if they are British. But then British immigration became suspicious of him for not using his Euro passport and cross questioned him.

Call me old fashioned or xenophobic, but I really don't agree with dual nationalities. You live in a country, you become a citizen, you pay your taxes and you take the benefits of being a citizen of that country. While the people with self interest, like me and Rupert, of course might avail ourselves of the opportunity, why should we be allowed to?

Even more puzzling, why would you want to be a dual national of war torn, corrupt and destroyed country and one of the relatively civilised western countries. Don't give me attachment to the homeland crap. It will always be about personal self interest of some kind.

Well, it seems via Trumpet in the US, dual nationals from many countries are being disadvantaged. I feel for them and their difficulties, but for goodness sakes, show a bit a of commitment to the country where you live, contribute to and take from. The alternative is called a foot in both paddocks, or a bob each way. It comes with consequences, as dual nationals are finding.

This could be published any old time, but I will make it an extra Friday post, as if the media is to be believed, Trumpet has now shown serious disrespect to Australia and our Prime Minister. Trumpet, we now have a personal reason to hate you, and mein gott, how could the US possibly have elected such a person as you and the craziness you have bought to such a high office.

23 comments:

  1. I've no intention of living anywhere else...never have had...never will have...so my feet are firmly planted on the ground here in the wonderful Land of Oz.

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    1. Lee, I used to dream a bit about living elsewhere, but not now. The more I have travelled overseas, the more I appreciate Australia, for all its faults.

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  2. Strumpet is disrespecting us Aussies? Well damn, now I'll have to start watching the news to see what's going on. What's he been saying? Should we build a wall around Aus to keep him out?

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    1. River, no need to build a wall. I doubt he will ever be invited to visit or want to visit. Besides, he would make us pay for the wall to keep him out. He is a very disturbed and disturbing man and worst of all, totally unreadable and unpredictable. What good did he think would come from being rude to our PM, and therefore us.

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  3. Oh don't get me started on the chump Andrew, he's doing my head in! I'm seriously astonished that he is actually happening, I mean the man is a blithering idiot, unfortunately the devious men he has surrounded himself with are not!When we first arrived in Australia we did have both British and then Aussie passports, we kept the BP's up for quite a while but eventually let them run out. We committed 😀

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    1. Grace, I never really believed he would be as extreme as he is turning out to be. I think R's is half way into ten years and I doubt he will renew it next time.

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  4. I'm so ashamed of the USA for electing that man. I'm so sorry. Please know that the majority of us did NOT vote for him, he got handed the victory due to the outdated and ridiculous electoral college.

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    1. Jennifer, the most wonderful thing you gain when reading overseas blogs is a better understanding of the country and its people. It is very unfortunate that more people did not get out and vote.

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    2. With the electoral college in place, it may not have made much difference no matter how many voted. It's an unfairly skewed system.

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  5. In my family only my husband has one nationality, I have the German and Italian (by marriage) our son is German and Italian and our Grandson German and Dutch. That's the law. Of course you live not in another country but on another continent. And then the "Australians" all have different countries from where they immigrated or "were" immigrated. They all choose a new land to live in so it's normal that you only want to be Australian ! That's like the people from Canada and the USA.

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    1. You are right Gattina. It is much more complicated in Europe. Wouldn't you be happy for your family to be just known as Belgian?

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  6. I just shake my head every morning when I see the news and see what our President Trump is up to. I didn't vote for him
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, pretty well what we do. Our jaws drop as one more outrage comes from his mouth.

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    2. Andrew, I won't call you xenophobic but I will call you old fashioned.
      There are lots of good reasons why people could have a permanent and enduring attachment to more than one country so that they can fairly ask to have an unqualified right to enter and remain in that country. I don't think it is necessary for countries to be like jealous spouses and require citizens to forsake all other allegiances.

      Incidentally, Rupert does not have dual citizenship because at the time he became a US citizen Australian law was that he lost his Australian citizenship. That Australian law has since changed, but the US citizenship remains that way. Not of course that citizenship is much of an issue for Rupert other than the reasons he had for getting US citizenship, because he is still rich enough to be able to go pretty much where he pleases and still throws his weight around here as though he were still an overmighty Australian.

      As to the "paying taxes" line of argument, increasingly many benefits or entitlements associated with "citizenship" are also conditional on residency.

      I really don't understand your point about attachment to a homeland being "crap" and mere self-interest. First because I don't see that it is crap (and to take your example, there are many people from "crappy" countries who are still attached to them and have good reasons (family/parents/property/culture) for wanting to maintain their connection and, who knows, maybe even to go back when things get better.

      Secondly, because what is wrong with self-interest anyway? Surely it is entirely legitimate to have an interest in where you can live?

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    3. Marcellous, there is an endless number or reasons why people would want dual citizenship, but I just don't agree with it being allowed. You can have permanent residency of a country and still retain citizenship of another. Surely that is enough and if not, commit one way or the other.

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    4. Andrew, your last sentence doesn't make sense - if permanent residence in one country and citizenship in another is not enough (your "if not"), how will committing to just one country make up for that?

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    5. Badly phrased, I meant commit to citizenship in one country and a permanent resident of another.

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  7. I have always thought that there is no way I could forego my Australian citizenship. I did live overseas for many years but all of those years was spent 'in the service of the Australian Government'.

    What if I were to live in another country indefinitely for private reasons? Would I assume a new citizenship and give up my Aussie passport? I can't imagine doing so even though part of me thinks that is what I should do in such circumstances. I don't think I'll ever be faced with that dilemma; not voluntarily anyway, because I can't see myself migrating to another country.

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    1. Victor, I think if you properly commit to another country, perhaps involving having a local partner and a family, then I probably would. But it is not going to happen with me. I know which side my bread is buttered.

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  8. 'Tis a right proper mess 'Passports' etc. sounds complicated at times.
    As for Trump - his day will come, it's the mess inbetween that's of concern.

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    1. Margaret, only complicated for those who have more than one. I don't suppose you have one, being a local traveller, content with your own backyard, albeit a very large one.

      I despair about Trump and I think I may just tune out of anything about the US for a while.

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  9. I call it "riding the fence", ready to bail off one side or the other depending which side has the greener grass to graze upon. And if that grass vanishes from too much grazing the fence riders jump back up on the fence and hop to the other side. Miserable behavior! I read about our President's nasty behavior towards your PM. More to come of that behavior, I'm sure. He is destroying everything America was, just two weeks ago, and fast. Don't ask me how we elected him. I didn't vote for him. I just hope he doesn't kill us all. chances he won't seem slim.

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    1. Strayer, I feel the same. It is doubling your chances in a way. He has turned out to be worse than our nightmares.

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