Wednesday, January 11, 2017

A question for my rural correspondents

I don't tend to mix with people from the countryside anymore, but I do see a good bit of the written word and photos from the country. It is probably no surprise that I don't have contact with country people, so I want them to answer this.

When I was a lad, I stubbornly pronounced paddock as it is written. My family, neighbours, schoolmates and everyone I knew said paddick. The self righteous know it all that I was ( how dare you say I still am), refused to say paddick. How could dock be pronounced as dick.....umm, oh, my mind just ran away with me with another word, a short word ending in ock that has a synonym that ends in ick. Forgive my meanderings.

So, step up to the crease you rural folk. What is said now in the country? Do people still say paddick or did I win the battle with paddock?

I will slap anyone who says field.

34 comments:

  1. When we lived in rural NSW the dicks were ubiquitous. I suspect they still are.

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    1. Hmmm EC. Will I run with this? No, I will go too far.

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  2. Who knows there are so many different people in my area half the time I not sure what anyone is saying, I had a lovely chat with a lady at the bus stop the other day and I'm not even sure what we were talking about and she was talking english after a fashion.
    Merle........

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    1. Merle, that sort of chat is amusing. While neither of you knew exactly what the other was saying, you both felt good about the chat.

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    2. That is very true.
      Merle........

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  3. I've never heard anyone saying paddock, it's been paddick as far back as I can remember.
    What about garage. How do you pronounce it. gar-arj? garridge?

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    1. River, definitely gar-arj. I think garridge is an English pronunciation but I don't think all over England.

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  4. I've always called it a paddock but then I'm city folk. Isn't a field a baby paddock?

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    1. Jah Teh, I don't think size matters when talking about whether it is dicks or docks.

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  5. Paddick must be an Aussie thing. I've only heard paddock.

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    1. Sandra, probably an English hangover. But I don't think paddock is your usual term for a farm field?

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    2. You're right. It's not. For us it's a small enclosure near the barn for exercising or saddling your horse.
      Enjoy the day.

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  6. They have their own slang

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    1. Gosia, seems like it.

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  7. What's up, Doc?

    I say "paddock" as written...always have, and I always will. And no silly dick is going to make me pronounce the word otherwise! :)

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  8. English pronunciations are changing as most of us have noticed. So it's said no one is incorrect how they pronounce words today...I read it somewhere.
    Having stayed in the country on some school holidays as a child here in Tasmania, there were various ways to pronounce the one word 'paddock'. A lot depended if the Irish accent or the English (poms) accent was used, I say paddock in between the two if you can work that out!

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    1. Margaret, I think I do the same now, in between, not ock as in clock, but certainly not ick.

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    2. Yes something like that River...thanks :)

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    3. More like paddoock, I think. Actually River, you have got it there. Paddack was quite common too.

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  9. It's not something I've given much thought to Andrew but after saying it several times quickly I'm absolutely going with paddock!

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    1. Good to hear Grace. You was proper edjicated like.

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  10. Here I've always pronounced it "pad dack" With the "dack" sounding like the "ack" in "crack".

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    1. Some people tell me I have a foreign accent. But its only when I slip up I talk with accents. I entertain myself imitating other people, when alone. Sometimes I slip it over into communication with others. When my younger brother and I are together we still feign accents for fun, and confuse many gas station attendants and clerks.

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  11. I'm not a rural correspondent but I believe I pronounce the 'ock' ending but I can imagine if my voice trails away it might sound to others like 'ick'.

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  12. Strayer, I think dack is preferable to the dick. I love that you play around with accents. How is your Aussie accent? I believe it is very difficult to get right, as Meryl Streep will attest.

    Victor, I would have guessed that. I would have also wrongly guessed you would insert some vulgar humour.

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    1. Not so wrong Andrew. I started to write a vulgar comment and then thought better of it.

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    2. My Aussie accent is deplorable, but perhaps better than Streeps'. I mix it up so it becomes a cross with an Indian dialect sound. People scratch their heads and wonder where I might have come from, what rock I crawled from under.

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  13. No paddocks (or fields) here, just paddicks.

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    1. Thanks CM. I was hoping you would give the definitive answer.

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  14. I grew up with paddicks. Though this particular word isn't listed, here's an interesting resource from the ABC which you probably don't know about. http://www2b.abc.net.au/ABCPronunciation/

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    1. Thanks James. I have seen the style guide online but not this pronunciation guide. To my disappointment, the first word I checked, kilometre, either pronunciation is correct. Just out of interest, and I forget which English media source, Beijing is still referred to as Peking.

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