Thursday, December 15, 2016

Watching paint dry

We made a second trip to Station Pier to see a ship set sail, this time on time. We gave up the last time with another ship when it left very late.

It was turning out to be a bit like watching paint dry but then did become a little interesting. Beware, I am going to talk about thrusting, at times.

The ship, Pacific Jewel, looked old and without balconies. How old? Wikipedia tells me Crown Princess was built in 1989 in Italy for the Sitmar Cruises. In 2002 P&O bought Sitmar and she was renamed A'Rosa Blu. She was refitted in Singapore in 2004 and renamed AIDAblu. Another name change in 2007 saw her become Ocean Village Two. She received her current name in 2009 when she was transferred to her new P&O home port, Sydney.

Ropes tying her to the pier and nice and tight.


Right thrusters on to move her in towards the pier so that the ropes slacken and are able to be unhooked.


What is going on here? Hundreds of seagulls have appeared and are out the front of the ship and in a feeding frenzy. The thrusting has clearly churned up something in the water.


The last of the ropes is unhooked and they disappear into the ship's innards. With a bit of left thrusting, she moves away from the pier.


As she ponderously moves forward, the feeding frenzy moves to the rear of the ship.


So that is a tick for me, watching a ship set sail and I shan't bother again, unless I can wave off someone I know.

35 comments:

  1. So many name changes. She is big isn't she? And still a tiddler compared to some...

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    1. EC, it seems all ships look huge until they are next to a bigger one.

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  2. Not a thrill watching a ship leave port. ok from inside when sailing especially at night, seeing the night lights on shore and land disappear.

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    1. Margaret, much more fun when people used to throw streamers. Yes, that must be nice to be on the departing ship.

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  3. Anonymous7:34 am

    You and your thrusting. You forgot to warn about being tied up with ropes. I was all of a-quiver. - Ian

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    1. Ian, whatever can you mean.

      John, don't encourage him.

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  4. Although i have never seen one, i do miss the old fashioned three funnel liner....aka the queen mary...deco to a T

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    1. I had forgotten the three funnels, John. Yes, they looked grand.

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  5. Andre the ship has an original sape. I like it

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    1. Gosia, a rather old shape really.

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  6. Thanks for your nice comments I hope I will be shortly on line but so many problems and now my allergy.. Never ending story

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    1. No problem. Get everything fixed for Christmas, including yourself.

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  7. Never been on a cruise ship. But where is the ship set sail for.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Not sure Dora, but as it returned six days later, not very far. Maybe New Zealand or around our island state, Tasmania.

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  8. Damn thing looks top heavy to me. I'm with John, nothing can replace the old Queens.

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    1. With pursed lips I reply, yes Jah Teh.

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  9. The ship seems to have every facility a traveller could want eg casino, comedy club, swimming pools, gyms, art gallery, bars/espresso bars/restaurants, cinema, music performances. So that is where I would be - ON the ship, planning which port cruise to do in the Great Barrier Reef or New Zealand :)

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    1. Hels, even though old externally, I am sure it is very well appointed inside.

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  10. Oh come now. That sounds dreadfully exciting.

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    1. Strayer, nope. The feeding frenzy of seagulls was a bit interesting.

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  11. Hm, not sure I would actually want to set foot on such a ship, so seeing it off with me safely on dry land, away from hundreds and hundreds of other travellers, would be my preferred option.

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    1. Friko, no icebergs downunder. What could possibly go wrong?

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  12. This brough back memories for me, when I was just a youngster my brother and I often hung around the wharf at Port Pirie and watched the big ships leaving. We'd hung around for the whole time they were in harbour too, and got to know some of the sailors, so we always waved goodbye if we were able.

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    1. River, I am smiling widely at your memories. You had a pretty free childhood, allowed to roam and explore and swim.

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  13. that would be 'brought' with a 't'

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  14. Oh my gosh, I wonder what the feeding frenzy is about.
    Okay, I've got a strange question for you. Did you shoot me an email awhile back? I got one from an Andrew but I didn't recognize the last name so I wasn't sure if it was you or not......

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    1. Sandra, something tasty must have been stirred up. My email address is andrewhighriser at gmail, and I don't recall sending you an email. So if it did not come from that address, then it wasn't me.

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  15. I don't care how much thrusting is on offer Andrew, I'm never getting on one of those beasts 😀😀

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    1. Hehe Grace. No, I guess you wouldn't.

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  16. Now I want to go on a cruise !

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    1. Gattina, a Mediterranean cruise would be easy for you to do.

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  17. If I happen to be there at the time I quite enjoy watching a ship depart from Sydney's Overseas Terminal. The way they ease away from the wharf, then do a slow ninety degree turn in the narrow gap between the Harbour Bridge and the Opera House before steaming ahead fascinates me.

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    1. Victor, I am sure such a setting makes watching a departing ship much more interesting. Our just leave the pier and disappear over the horizon.

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