Sunday, December 04, 2016

Sunday Selections

Joining in with River and others for Sunday Selections. This week's are totally random.

Brighton Antique Dealer has given us some very nice gifts over time but this time for my recent birthday.....well, not our style. It's a fashion drawing with Italian words and it was hinted that it was worth something. It is resting in a drawer while we decide where we won't be hanging it. I dislike the frame more than anything.


A new Myki validator on a new tram. It is lightning fast, but it doesn't show your card balance. This is good as people won't hover in the doorways while trying to check their card balance.


Town Hall flower boxes. There quite a number of them and the flowers change often. In the background is a stand of either geraniums or pelargoniums. I have grown both, at times from cuttings and they do very well after being left on the hot driveway for two days before planting, yet still I can't tell the difference between the two. Can someone inform me?


We assumed our Hong Kong born neighbours owned their place, especially when they told us that when they moved in when our building opened, they slept a few nights on the floor before they bought beds and there was no hot water. But no, they were tenants of a friend of theirs. They did drive a Mercedes though. Social climbers that they were, they built a house in Hoppers Crossing! and left us after a decade or more. So selfish and I still haven't forgiven them. Since then a succession of overseas students have rented bedrooms. I think they are mainland Chinese as they don't seem to be able to relate to western people at all, and they are young. Well, students have to earn money and your guess at her profession is as good as mine. A make up consultant? Given the very weird hours she keeps, like lights on a 3 am, I think the extreme.  I didn't notice the mozzies on the window when I snapped. It is evidence that we are plagued by them this year, yet not once have I been bitten.


I must have been fiddling with camera settings.


Look out balloon driver for that very sharp looking church spire.


When I saw the balloon, I realised I hadn't seen any for months. Last year they continued to fly for the whole year, unlike in years past. But this year, again they stopped over winter.


This is a very large poster high on a wall at the big green hardware shed in Port Melbourne. I rather like it as a gesture of recognition for the workers. Nearly in the centre is the signature of Avtar Singh, with the S looking a bit like an erect cobra snake.


Yes, yes, tree fire risk, power lines and all that, but really! Why do trees have to be so humiliated? I caught the tram to Port Melbourne as the big green shed is less than ten minutes walk from the tram stop, but after leaving, there was a bus due that is closer, so I caught that back to town.


The forecourt of The Age building in Spencer Street, taken from the bus. Give 'em some grass, and they will sit on it, unless of course it is Paris where grass sitting or walking upon grass is verboten. No wait, it is not The Age building. I don't where it is.


A touch of  the countryside in Queen Street in the city while I was waiting for the bus home. It took as long to travel three city blocks in the earlier bus from Spencer Street to Queen Street than it did to get from Port Melbourne to Spencer Street. I should have left the bus at Spencer Street and caught a train to Flinders Street and a tram home.


Splendid food at a barbeque a couple of weeks ago, and I am not showing the huge piece of meat I shoved into my mouth.



No Jack, no human food for you. Dog Jack shows a great interest in human food and the preparation and smells of it, but does not like to eat it, except for cauliflower.


I am kind of sad about this photo. These are Little Jo's things on top of our fridge for when she visits. They haven't been used for a long time and are quite dusty. I guess it is time to put them away. She will be ten next year and I don't think Dora the Explorer has much appeal to her now.


The gladdies were great, for a few days.


I only offered advice on the Christmas cake making this year. It turned out really well, in spite of my advice. I did physically assist by putting my finger on a piece of string and simultaneously holding all four corners of the brown paper while the brown paper was tied. (you try that! It was stressful) They are actually cut up brown paper bags and we have two packets, through poor shopping practice, of 200 brown paper bags. So 400, less those used, perhaps 30. Please don't send me brown paper bags as a Christmas gift, unless they are the kind of brown paper bags that politicians and police receive as gifts.


22 comments:

  1. What an eclectic collection. Love it. Agree with you about the frame on Antique Dealer's gift.
    Christmas cakes... I made rather a lot this year and think I have finished.
    Love the Bunnings poster and still snickering at the pollie's brown bags.

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    1. EC, what did you do with all the cakes? Set up a street stall? If you are short of a bob, I can send a few dollars.

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  2. As an avid art collector, I would never give art as a gift (and I hope that my friends don't give me art either). People's tastes vary so widely and it can be awkward if you don't like it. Yes, I know...First world problems.

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    1. Ad Rad, you are correct, but she usually gets it pretty right. Very much a first world problem.

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  3. The trees were humiliated and tortured into sick shapes, only because of the overhead power lines. After 100 years of electricity being brought into our suburbs and homes, it is about time the power lines were run underground instead. This would make the streets both safer and more aesthetically pleasing, and the trees could grow normally.

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    1. Hels, while I suppose it is quite expensive to underground power lines, it should be an ongoing process. The only prune so hard and badly so they don't have to do it as often.

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  4. wow christmas cake

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    1. Gosia, once your internet is working properly again, I will email you a piece of cake.

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  5. Our dog also has interest in what we're having. Look like a good food.
    Sure hope your day is going good.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Thanks Dora. The day was a good but tiring. Someone has fallen asleep on the couch as I type.

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  6. I also have been given a few 'special' pressies that come out only when the gifter is visiting ☺ I think the difference between geraniums and pelargoniums is in the formation of the flowers, I could be wrong! There are a few parks in Paris where you can picnic on the lawn.. Parisians picnic in their own way 😀 can't believe Christmas is so close, I have about 25 coming for lunch aaaargh!

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    1. Grace, you are going to have to put P to work. Twenty five! It will be chaos and even if all is not perfect, no one will notice and a great time will be had by all. Is the son and his family attending?

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    2. They are Andrew, they arrive on the 16th, there are now four of them staying plus Aimee because she doesn't want to miss a moment with the them.. so it's going to be full house 😊 will be exhausting but fun!

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  7. Lovely collection for Sunday and I don't care for that ugly frame either, would look ok on the wall with a nicer frame.

    The difference between the two plants:
    While the genera Geranium and Pelargonium are related, both being members of the family Geraniaceae, they are quite distinct. True geraniums, also known as cranesbills, referring to the shape of the fruit, for the most part have symmetrical flowers with ten fertile stamens. Most Pelargonium have bilaterally symmetrical flowers with up to seven of the ten stamens fertile. True Geraniums have a different seed dispersal technique than Pelargoniums. Geraniums fling their seeds away while Pelargonium seeds float away on the breeze and usually have a 'feathered ' end that Geraniums don't have. Of course, you can only see this when they are producing seeds.
    Pelargoniums are tender perennials and occur naturally almost entirely within South Africa. Leave of true geraniums are usually deeply divided and cut while those of most groups of pelargoniums are not. Pelargoniums also have rather thick, succulent stems, originating as they do from areas where they have to withstand summer drought, whereas geraniums have the appearance of 'normal' herbaceous perennial plants, a mounding form of many many slender stems arising from a central core, and fibrous roots.
    Plants sold at garden centers that are labeled "Ivy Geranium", "Scented Geranium" and "Zonal Geranium" are actually three different species of pelargonium. Some names that true geraniums are commonly known by are "Hardy Geranium", "Geranium" and "Cranes Bill".

    Yum with the food, and the little dog is very cute.
    Little Jo, adult plates now I expect if she's turning 10 next year...how time flies.

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    1. Thanks Margaret. I think the easiest way then is to check the stems. Or maybe the leaves, which are flat and even for the pelargoniums and not for geraniums.

      Dog Jack is staying with us for a few days over Christmas. Little Jo is tall for her age and I noticed today she is developing a chest.

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  8. Let me suggest you reframe that picture in something much thinner. That gold frame is far too thick. I'd suggest something narrow and shiny, but dark, perhaps black chrome which was popular years ago, but hard to find now.
    Margaret-above me here has described the difference between geraniums, ivy geraniums and pelargoniums very well. I'm confused by the differences, knowing only that the cranesbill type is a true geranium and what I call pelargoniums probably aren't.
    Barbecue food has certainly come a long way from the sausages, chops and onions served alongside white bread and tomato sauce that I knew as a child. I was 16 before I saw salads at a BBQ and then it was just potato salad and coleslaw.
    Your Christmas cake looks good, I still haven't gotten around to trying my hand at one, even though I have Sue's recipe.
    Next weekend I'll be making a start with my mince pies.

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  9. I'm curious about the brown paper bags for pollies and policemen?

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    1. River, it happened in many places, but bribes in brown paper bags full of cash were especially popular in Sydney.

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  10. In that case, I'd like one of those brown paper bags myself. A nice fat one. I'll write to Santa.

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  11. Here, once, when I lived in Corvallis, I had a friend who said a local Chinese couple with a restaurant kept an apartment in her group, where they kept labor, Chinese girls, she thought were likely illegal and living close to a slave life, brought over, housed, to work in the Chinese restaurant long long hours. None spoke English. That balloon photo is grand, so is the warning about the spear point church spire. What an awful fate should the wind shove the balloon close to that! The glads look sad while the dog looks hopeful! Cauliflower? What about cheese, Jack?

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    1. Strayer, that happens here too. At times there are raids but I expect they only touch the tip of the iceberg. No, he doesn't eat cheese either, but he might if it was cheese sauce over cauliflower.

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