Sunday, November 20, 2016

Gardens and a renovation

We took a tram to Elwood and walked along a residential street. This is a very nice block of apartments.


The other side of the street is not so grand. I guess the family in this home are Footscray Football Club supporters.


One of the gates to the Blessington Street Gardens, also known as the St Kilda Botanical Gardens.


As I commented on a post by Cathy, the roses in Melbourne seem extraordinarily good this year. To see the roses was the main reason we visited.






We saw Blue Moon roses, which we used to grow and they were great.


Weddings here, I should think.




The green house, fountain and Rain Man.


Rain Man is solar powered, so the water flow depends on the strength of the sun.


Much work has been going on in Acland Street. Tram tracks replaced, platform stops installed and half the street now closed to cars. It was far from finished when we were there, but I liked the way it was shaping up. Big Mouth is somewhat of a St Kilda institution.


I am not so keen on these retro futuristic tram shelters and nor do they look very good as weather protection.


The area has been officially opened now, but I am not sure if it is finished. Of course now the rest of shopping street looks shabby.


Fly me to the moon........


I could have/should have stood up from the temporary seating where we brunched to take a better photo, but I didn't.


Route 96 is mostly run by E class trams, but here is a C2 class about to depart the terminus on the shiny new tracks.


28 comments:

  1. Love that gate. And agree about the shelters.
    Our roses are good too. More rain at the right time? I was once told that you can keep things alive by watering them, but plants need rain to grow. Simplistic but there is a kernel of truth in it.

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    1. EC, yes I am sure Mother Nature does it better......when she does do it right.

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  2. Andrew wow garden is great so colourful..

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  3. I hope there were scented roses amongst the abundance of colour. Grateful view of the red and white tape.

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    1. There were Marie and two ageing men spent a good bit of time doubled over and sniffing.

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  4. I do like the look of that gate. You seem to have a lot of art in your city on display and beautiful places.

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    1. Strayer, you always have to remember with my very local photos, they are generally taken in the inner, trendy and expensive suburbs. Greater Melbourne has 5 million people and its footprint is enormous. There are miles and miles of outer areas where there is just suburban house after suburban house.

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  5. The roses have been good in Sydney this year too.
    I like your Rain Man.
    Merle.............

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    1. Merle, Rainman has come and gone and it is so good to see him back and flowing.

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  6. Ahhhhhhhh you are in my home territory :) Loved it in the 1950s with mum and dad, and now I take my grandchildren for hot chocolates in (the renewed) Ackland St.

    I don't remember the rose covered band stand which seems to be Edwardian. Gorgeous for summer weddings *nod*

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    1. Gosh Hels, I wonder what it was like in the fifties. Many more flowering annuals, I should think. We have a fifteen year old family photo, or more, taken within the band stand. It could be reproduction.

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  7. Timely post. My friend just moved to St Kilda and we were helping her move some stuff yesterday and it was only then that I noticed that the Acland St transformation. didn't even realise it was on the books.

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    1. Ad Rad, the shopkeepers protested against the upgrade long and hard, and it seems not so effectively, as you didn't know about the upgrade.

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  8. The rose festooned gazebo is the perfect place for pretty wedding photos.
    I quite like the modern tram station, but you're right about the weather protection. Designers just don't think about the people who wait and wait and wait, in burning sunshine, torrential rains or icy winds, just to get from A to B.

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    1. River, shelters that afford poor shelter from the rain, and as you point out, the sun too, is a world wide problem. Style over substance.

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  9. oh Acland nostalgia. Thanks HR. Just drove in this morning from Coleraine via Hamilton and everywhere there are massive rose displays. Must be the global warming. Stay cool dear hearts

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    1. Annie, you have spoilt it now. A bad thing is giving us great roses. Wait for the greenhouse effect to kick in and it will be too humid for roses.

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  10. aah yes, I have noticed the proliferation of gorgeous roses too. Beautiful.

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    1. Just amazing this year, Fen.

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  11. Love roses. They look nice in the photos.
    That sure is a bright fence..

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    1. Margaret, the fence probably goes against local heritage controls, but who cares.

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  12. Lovely gate into the botanical garden Andrew. I hope the perfume in the rose garden was gorgeous, my very favourite summer flower, not the hothouse roses though, they are so disappointing! Looks like a few blossom trees also, what a sight! Breakfast/brunch is my most preferred meal to eat out. Sounds like you guys had a very nice day.. you needed it after mum's day 😀

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    1. Grace, yeah, we were owed after a Mother Day, and I only had to hear about it.

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  13. flowers wow....No flowers here but dug carrots and leeks out of our garden.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, so will it be carrot and leek soup? Not sure I want.

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  14. Gosh, I'd give my.....well come to think of it I wouldn't, but I do so wish we had a public transit system here in NorthEastPennsylvania, thus the name carlnepa. There was a system called the Laurel Line that was a 3rd rail electrified system that ran between two old anthracite coal cities; Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. It cost about 5 cents (US) to ride and it also carried cargo, colliery payrolls (which was actually robbed back around 1917 give or take). We have Steamtown now in Scranton, which is a National Park Service park dedicated to steam passenger rail. People pile in their cars to drive miles to see old trains and to pay money to ride them, but when the ride is over they jump back into their cars and drive off, never stopping to think what a marvelous, relaxing, fun way it is to travel. The Laurel Line died in the early 1950's, btw, along with local trolley systems, victims of the rise of the automobile and the highway and collusion with the oil companies.

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    1. Carl, all very interesting. Most Australian cities lost their street car system in the 50s and 60s but Melbourne retained its system and has increased it somewhat. I can't imagine Melbourne without it. Aside from some select areas in large cities, I can't ever see public transport coming to the fore in the US, sad to say. Not so much in the US because we didn't travel much there, but in Canada I noticed freestanding large stores on the outskirts of towns with huge areas of parking around them. Necessary, I suppose but I can't say I liked the look. I understand many of your suburban streets don't have footpaths, which is rather unfortunate. Who would choose to walk even a short distance on soggy grass or the road itself.

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