Thursday, November 17, 2016

Debunking myths

We went to an afternoon party hosted by a friend. While there was a few gay guys there and maybe a straight person or two, most of the guests were dykes. I am not a great party person but I quite enjoyed the party. I chatted to various women who wear sensible shoes and even some of the same persuasion who wear heels.  Afternoon parties suit me so much better. Funnily, or presciently, quite a good bit of the conversation was about elderly parents and the care for them. Given the party was hosted by a dyke who is going to have her parents move in with her, and the party was kind of her last freedom party, to talk about ageing parents was not that strange. R's volunteer work is with the elderly and one person at the party worked in aged care. Her eighty plus year old parents jet off to Hawaii and then drive from the airport to Trentham. My eighty year plus mother doesn't leave her house unless one of her children or carers take her out. I certainly gave my input into the discussion of ageing parents.

One gay man we met at the party proclaimed that orthodox Jews have sex with a sheet in between their bodies. That is, the man covers the woman with a sheet that has a hole in an appropriate place.

I had not heard of this and I was immediately suspicious about this suggestion and then that it could be repeated endlessly until it is believed.

Having just skimmed through the sex manual for ultra orthodox Jews, it is essentially a myth. Maybe a weirdo orthodox Jewish couple do that, but as far as I can see,  not. It goes against human nature to not have skin to skin contact and human nature will win over every time.

The dyke friend is an excellent cook and we ate well and had some left over home cooked stir fry for a light dinner later.

Today, Tuesday, we journeyed to Victoria Gardens, first by train, via a rather nice Victoria Street cafe for brunch that we have come to like. We looked at some furniture in Freedom that we can't afford. R bought a calico jumper hanger for his wardrobe to replace his worn out 14 year old one. Back in town, I bought an advent calendar for Little Jo at Chocolate Box. I bought myself some coconut ice and R bought a gift of a small bag of chocolates for a friend. I told R to not 'do a Grace' and eat the chocolate bought for someone else, and to keep it for sending.

All good.

The subject line is debunking myths. No matter how many times I tell Mother, a cold is caused by a virus that you catch from another person, she still insists you catch a cold if you are out in the cold, especially if your hair is wet or if you get caught in a rain shower. If you have a baby, you must superheat the child to stop it getting a cold virus.

32 comments:

  1. Serendipity. I have been thinking about those myths recently and might do a post about them next week. One of my sisters in law firmly believes the cold from cold thing. And also says that sitting on a cold surface will give you piles.

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    1. EC, I have hear the one about sitting on a cold surface too, but I can't imagine it is true. I look forward to clear thinking analysis.

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    2. Piles are caused by some type of internal pressure on the veins, usually constant straining from constant constipation, or pressure from the increasing weight of a pregnant uterus taking up room and pushing other organs out of place temporarily. Usually not until the third trimester when the baby is fully formed but now putting on enough weight to survive at birth.

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  2. Andrew you are right your mother is wrong..

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    1. Gosia, I tell my mother I am always right but she doesn't believe me.

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  3. Funny you should say that, as a child I was always wrapped up in so many things I should never have suffered a cold in my life but I did maybe it was that generation as my mother always said the same as your mum.
    I like afternoon parties too.
    Merle..........

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    1. Merle, when Little Jo was a baby, we used to be concerned that she was underdressed and cold, not that she seemed cold. Bone Doctor said it did not matter if her arms or legs were cold, it was her core temperature that it important.

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  4. Every dinner or social event that I went to over the age of 60 was dominated by concerns for elderly parents. First it was let them stay at home if they want Vs move them into a residential facility with backup staff. Then when one parent died, it was helping the remaining parent participate in concerts, film nights and bridge games by him/herself. Finally it was a lot of visits to the GP, the specialists, chemist shops and dentist.

    I was tired for 4 years and then exhausted for another 2.5 years. But now there is nothing to do :(

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    1. Hels, yes, I can see it was such a drastic lifesyle change for you. My only remark is that people need to get themselves into a sustainable living situation when they are old, so that they can stay in their home to near the end, mental health being ok.

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    2. Andrew

      3 hours after I wrote this comment, I was having coffee in front of my local espresso bar. Totally unsolicited, a friend dropped his shirt and showed me his heart surgery scar. So I dropped my shirt and showed him mine. He won :)

      Now the parents are very elderly or gone, we will be moving into the health care concerns of the next generation - OURS!

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    3. Good story Hels. A variation on my poor upbringing was worse than yours. Yes, out generation will be the next one to need care, but we are a bit smarter, aren't we? My mother has the same name as yours, but they are worlds apart.

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  5. I once proved to a new mother that unwrapping her over dressed baby was the way to stop him crying. He was overheated and cranky and she couldn't settle him. Once she'd removed two blankets a bonnet and his socks he was much more comfortable and fell asleep. The poor child was wearing all that in February, while the mother had a t-shirt and shorts on. She'd been told by her mother that new babies should be kept warm and i told her warm is fine but don't cook him.
    I'm pretty sure I'll still be taking myself out and about when I'm 80+. I don't get out much, but when I do, I don't wait for someone else to take me.
    Laughed at R "doing a Grace". I used to do that all the time with Easter eggs. I'd buy them early, good quality ones, before they sold out. Then I'd snack on them after dinner.

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    1. River, I so believe you. Even I sleep better when I am a little on the cool side. Yes, buying chocolates for the future is not a very good idea.

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  6. Crikey Andrew .... that was some party, mate!! Mum can't get passed the bit about the orthodox jews having sex with a sheet between them. She spat her mouthful of tea at the computer when she got to that part.

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    1. Charlie, should your Mum ever hear that said, she can now correct the person. No licking up the spilt tea, now.

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  7. Isn't amazing how many different conversation can go on in this world.
    But it is also amazing what people come up with.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, I think one common thing the world over is talking about ageing parents.

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  8. I bet you all had a great time at the party - I can imagine the talk about ageing parents.
    My mother used to say what you mum said, as did my father - just couldn't tell them that you catch cold/flue via a virus.

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    1. Margaret, by grandparents used to say bathing daily was quite unnecessary and a waste of water, as well as increasing our chances of catching a cold. Even Mother did not believe that one.

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  9. Do you party often Andrew - are they always as interesting as this one?

    New babies can't shiver hence keeping them clothed - unless like River mentioned they get overheated.
    Piles came from sitting on hot surfaces like radiators ( not car ones but house ones) or so the mistresses at my school told us lol

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    1. Rarely do we party Cathy. But we do often go out for dinner with friends. Have you ever felt warmed up by shivering? I can't say I have. It must have all been about sitting. That was the danger, along with what the nuns told my girlfriend, don't talk to boys through the cyclone wire fence, or you will get pregnant.

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    2. I have noticed, that with a concerted effort to stop shivering, I don't feel the cold as much, although I don't actually feel warmer.

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    3. River, to stop shivering you kind of have to force you body to relax. I think you are right. Shivering makes you feel colder.

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  10. It's not just your mother that believes that myth, so many other people do too.
    Or that detoxing is necessary for your liver.
    My friend believed if you slept with a breeze in your room at night you'd get sick. (from a fan or open window)
    So much stupid.

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    1. Fen, isn't that what the liver is all about? Detoxing your system? I don't know that doctors ever suggest someone needs their liver detoxed. Yes, the breeze of fan is another, one of my grandparents actually, who always told us not to sit in front of a fan. Step mother's was not to sit too close to the fire or the fat around your kidneys would melt.

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    2. The liver does detox your system, but with a consistently poor diet, perhaps too fatty and too sugary, the liver can become fatty itself. Google fatty liver and see what comes up. Detoxing can be helpful in these cases, before the liver breaks down and doesn't function as well. It helps to eat the bitter and sour foods along with the sweet, or preferably before the sweet. There are also "liver herbs" available from health food stores to be drunk as tea. I have some in my cupboard right now and have a cup of the tea once a week or so. Dill pickles are a good way to help the liver, this is why they are added to fatty things such as Macca's burgers.

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    3. River, I remain a little dubious about the benefits.

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  11. Oh you always make me laugh Andrew.. a sheet with a hole in the 'appropriate' place, that's hilarious and I'm very pleased to hear that it's not true 😀 As I type I am acutely aware that I have 'advent' calendars for all the youngsters in the family stacked high in the cupboard.. I'm just like a Beagle, I can smell the chocolate from here.. will they survive until 1st December, time will tell 😁

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    1. "Daddy. Mummy. There is no chocolate for this day in my calendar".

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  12. The sheet myth story at a party, why not. He must not have had aging parents to speak of.

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    1. Perhaps he didn't, Strayer. The problem with stories such as the sheet, I am the only one who questioned it and probably checked.

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