Saturday, October 01, 2016

The bridge is always at fault

The Montague Bridge in South Melbourne is quite low at three metres, nearly ten feet. As I type this the website How many days since the Montague Street Bridge has been hit tells me it is seven days since its last strike, as of 23/09. Its first recorded strike was in 1929, a tour bus. Its latest was a campervan. Oh, I'm afraid...........it's ok, our campervan is 2.8 metres. I hope that includes the aircon unit on top. The bridge has been hit 102 times since 2009.

Staff tried to cover over the name Gold Bus Ballarat when one of their buses hit the bridge, for which they were given plenty of stick.


Swindon in England not only has a gig for its very complex magic roundabout (diagram in my post), but also the most hit railway bridge in England. This video presumably is a demonstration of what can happen when a bus hits a bridge. You would not want to be up top at the front, which we were on a bus in Newcastle, England. I think you would be safe on the normal bus route, but if the bus is diverted, move downstairs. Amazingly there is an actual driver in the driving seat.



Now I hope you Americans aren't feeling smug about English and Australian poor driving, because here is your turn.

In the town of Durham in North Carolina is the 11 foot 8 (inch) bridge. In 2008 a man moved into an office at the street corner and set up a web cam to capture the hits. He also set up another camera in another business on the adjacent corner. Of course it was essential that the world sees the smashes, so he has a website and a You Tube channel.

This is a compilation video by someone else of various vehicles hitting the bridge. It does a fine job of removing roof top air conditioners from the tops of buses. I think the bridge has been hit 111 times since 2008.



To steal a phrase from Mark Twain, what paralysis of intellect makes drivers not wonder, will I fit under this bridge?

14 comments:

  1. Andrew I like the green double decker but not the accident

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    1. Gosia, yes, I can't remember seeing double deckers in Europe.

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  2. Smiling at the Gold Bus cover up. A fail. Like the driving.

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    1. EC, the driver has just been charged with multiple offences.

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  3. That bridge has certainly coped a caning, and surprisingly stood the test of time!

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    1. CM, don't worry about bridge. It can take it and takes some glee in its score.

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  4. Lucky we don't have double deckers, some of our bus drivers are not to bright and rather cranky, I always sit downstairs or will now in a double decker if I ever catch one.
    Merle......

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    1. Merle, not that I remember them, but Sydney did have a lot of double deckers after the trams went. Very slow to load compared to the trams.

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  5. Not sure what our height of our wooden over pass is. Ouch I say.
    Coffee is on

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    1. Dora, I would guess higher or you would know about vehicles hitting it.

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  6. I remember when you guys were over here I think there were two cases of truck 'incidents' in Melbourne. You have to wonder if it might be easier to heighten the problem bridges 😀

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    1. Grace, you have reminded me. Maybe it was the day the bridge was hit twice in one day. Normally if anything is done, it is the road lowered but it very expensive.

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  7. Surprised that there are still strikes into the bridge after they constructed those plastic warning gantries.

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    1. Ad Rad, at least one that I know of.

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