Monday, October 31, 2016

Campervanning Day 11/12/13 Pt 1



We took a drive around Gundagai the next morning. While the weather was better, we were still being buffeted by winds and it was rather cold, such a contrast to the previous morning when we were on the coast at sea level. There are some very old and historic buildings in Gundagai.


A look out point above the town gives fine views. Centre left you can see the freeway bypass of the town.


Th old railway bridge and road bridge cross the flood plain of the Murrumbidgee River. Neither are used now for their original purpose.



You can see the river is still in a state of minor flood.



It is probably a ford under the water. You can see it must flood often as this is a permanent barrier gate.


A old mill on the river.


Down at the old rail and road bridges.


Time to go. We stopped off for lunch in Holbrook. It too has been bypassed and was often thought to be a halfway stopping point between Melbourne and Sydney. It sold cheap fuel too and there was an old submarine attraction. I am not sure about the submarine, but the fuel is no longer cheap.


Saddlery or just Saddles. We had a nice lunch at the local bakery and filled the van with diesel, trying to balance between having enough and returning the van almost empty of fuel.


Another surprise town to me where we stopped, expecting it to be dry and flat, was Yakandandah. It is a very nice little town with lots of  'olde wares' shops.


There are a couple of gay connections to Yak. One is a Paul Hogan movie called Strange Bedfellows, where two straight men pretend to be gay to receive financial benefit and the movie was set in Yak. I don't think it was a very good movie.



The movie did bring fame to the town.


The other connection is we have  to Yak is a former Melbourne acquaintance who has a business there with his partner. They were instrumental in starting the local gay festival, Spring Migration, over a decade ago.


The shop has a lot of Buddha statues. Alas the shop was closed the day we were there so we did not catch up with Andy.


We stopped for a time in another nice larger town, Myrtleford. There were some lovely gardens. I hope the wisteria is not allowed to run rampant over the cedrella tree.


I was just aiming my camera when the home owner appeared with a handful of weeds, so it is not a great photo of an excellent garden.


A short distance on was our destination, Bright.

12 comments:

  1. Andrew nice landscape, my favourite photo is the old mill. it ha an architecture which reminds me american one.

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    1. Gosia, the mill does not look American at all, so your opinion is interesting.

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  2. What a shame your friends weren't around. Yak looks like one of those US one street towns. It has been a fascinating trip with the coastal scenes being my favourite.

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    1. Marie, I am a coastal person too, but it was nice to visit higher and colder and invariably artistic places.

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  3. It is so much greener than usual. Lush even.
    I do love country towns. And miss living in one.

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    1. EC, that really struck us hard, how green everywhere was. Country towns are nice to look at, but they are not always so welcoming to outsiders.

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  4. On the road to Gundagai :)
    Nice little place, you captured it beautifully.

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    1. Margaret, damn. I meant to add the You Tube clip of the song. It is a nice place.

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  5. Like EC I love country towns, wandering around the Old Wares shops, the bakeries etc, then coming home again to the city. I could probably enjoy living in one if I had enough money to visit my kids in the city a couple of times a year. The absence of night time city noise has to be a bonus.

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    1. River, are you sure about the absence of city noise? You might really miss it. I would miss the the low volume white noise in the background, and Mother hated the noise where she is when it was much less. Now she says it gives her comfort.

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  6. Such a good way to see country towns Andrew. I really enjoy day trips to the country but you don't get to see too much because you're always thinking about the trip back. That wisteria is divine, let it grow rampant I say 😊😊

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    1. Grace, I can remember as a kid the excitement of trip but also the tiredness and boredom on the way home. It is good to stay away for a night though.

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