Thursday, October 27, 2016

Campervanning Day 10 10/10


After reasonably short drives over the last few days, today's would be a long one as we headed inland from Huskisson, Jervis Bay. I had carefully studied maps and there seemed to be a shorter route to get to Gundagia, as I said, used by Canberrians to get to Jervis Bay but it appeared that there was a short section of unmade, that is gravel, road. The route was a little shorter and not as many hairpin bends. However the park check in person thought the road was made. It was irrelevant as I tried to set the sat nav for that way and it would not accept it as it was an unpaved road. No doubt it was of a high standard, but for all I know the hire company might be tracking us using our sat nav, and there would be a record of it on the sat nav.

We decided to go via Nowra, over the Canbewarra Ranges and along the Kangaroo Valley to meet up with the Hume Freeway near Moss Vale. After Nowra we climbed and climbed and there were many tight curves, then we went down the other side, then climbed and climbed again but we did not have a steep descent as we now up on what I think are called the Southern Tablelands. It had been such a pretty, though mountainous, drive and we were then travelling along the Kangaroo Valley and that was very nice too. I can't now remember where this unusual bridge was.


We stopped for brunch at Fitzroy Falls, well just before the falls for the best coffee in Fitzroy Falls. We thought it was a joke as we thought it was the only place in Fitzroy Falls. The coffee was, shall I say, unremarkable. Just a short distance further on is the Aboriginal run Fitzroy Falls area. I was cross that we had to pay $5 to park there, but that was the only charge and the set up was excellent, with the amenities and walkways very good.


Nice.


The water drops 81 metres and by the time it reaches the bottom, it is mostly mist and small droplets.


R took this photo with his phone and is it better than mine taken with my camera? I think it is pretty good. I asked him about it and he said he took the photo and then clicked something on his phone named 'fix'.


The mountains were so impressive


It was quite warm and the blue haze is comes from the fumes of oil from Eucalyptus trees.


Well, onwards, and we stopped near Yass at a large service place where there was fuel and a number of chain takeaway food stores. As we had been naughty and had sausage rolls for brunch, we were virtuous and ate some left overs in our van and boiled the kettle.


At some point I felt a little cold and turned the air con off as we sped along the freeway at 110 km/h. The outside temperature had dropped drastically and then light rain began to fall and became steady rain. Truck drivers, and there are way too many trucks on the Hume, carrying freight that should go by an efficient rail freight system, were pretty good to drive with. They tended to drive at 105 km/h to 110 whereas I wanted to travel at the limit of 110. Often I sat behind a truck for a while, but as soon as they reached a hill, their speed would drop and around them I would go. At times hills were steep enough to knock my own speed down.

We just had to stop at the Dog on the Tuckerbox. It was first unveiled in the early 1930s and I had seen it before, but my memory of about forty years ago had no match to what I now saw. I believe the legend began from when the woman who owned a food kiosk in the early twentieth century at the location would for the cost of sixpence, have her dog pose on a tucker box, that is a portable food box, and take a photo with her new fangled camera in the very early twentieth century.


We were surprised to see 'no vacancy' signs flashing at the motels of Gundagai. R suggested that as the weather was so bad, we take a cabin and had an evening in more comfort. At the caravan park, cabins were booked out. All motels were full. We stopped the park's check in chick when she started to call B&B's. No, we will take a powered site. The check in chick was about fifty and had the most fabulous brunette full on big hair wig that at least doubled the size of her head space and told us the Family Hotel was perhaps the best place to dine. To our surprise, we were undercover for the night.....kind of, as I had to move the front of the van out so the wifi aerial would be clear to the sky, or whatever. Apparently some large project in the mountains had been shut down for a day hence the workers had taken the opportunity for some rest in Gundagai.


Dine at the Family Hotel we did, on very nice lamb cutlets but the place was nothing special, just a friendly country hotel. As you can see, the rain did stop. This park had non communal toilets and shower amenities, as you can kind of see in the photo above. You just find a vacant one and lock the door.
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The freeway was close by and above was farmland.


Gundagai was not flat, as I remembered, but very steep. The rivers were very high, flooding in places still from the previous week when we could not cross the mountain because of snow and didn't want to because of flooding. More about Gundagai in a subsequent post and our last full day before returning home.

21 comments:

  1. I'm loving this trip. Non communal toilets are a first for me. Great idea.

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    1. Marie, and non communal showers too!

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  2. The Dog on the Tuckerbox is a very old (mid 19th century) literary reference that didn't get made into sculpture, as you noted, until the 1930s. I first remember it in the 1950s when mum and dad drove us children to a camping holiday, but I cannot remember being impressed back then. Now I would be because, as an older citizen, I like memorials.

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    1. Hels, I said early c20 but it dates back to mid c19? It was cool to see, but only life sized. I expected something larger, even though I had seen it before in the late 70s.

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    2. Andrew

      The first literary reference/poem to this dog was apparently from the 1850s. I remember a bit of Australian poetry from primary school, but I don't remember Gundagai being mentioned.

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  3. That fall is amazing. And just mist by the time it gets to the bottom. Wow.

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    1. Sandra, I was impressed and glad we made the effort to see the falls.

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  4. R's photo is at a different angle to yours, so there is no way to say definitely which is better.
    I think it's funny how people will advertise "the best coffee" or the "best whatever, and when you buy them they are just the same as anywhere else.
    I've stayed at Yass once, many years ago, we got a room in a motel for the night, two adults and two babies in two double beds. Every other time we crossed the states, we slept in the car.

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    1. River, yes and no. R's photo is from a different angle, but that was not because he was standing somewhere different. His phone did that.

      So did you have a bit nookie in the Yass motel, so many years ago?

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    2. No, we each had a bed with a small child in it. Him with the baby boy and me with the girl.

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  5. Such familiar territory. And so many places I haven't stayed at ever, or visited in too long. Thank you.
    Yass always used to be a looooooong town. There seemed to be only a block or two behind the main street which made up the town.

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    1. EC, Aus seems to be full of towns like that off the main road, where they only go one or two streets back. We didn't really see Yass, just the servo.

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  6. I even like to say the names of the places you have visited, although I probably pronounce them wrong. We have to pay $5 just to park for day use in state parks. Seems like robbery to a native of the state. Speed limit on our freeways is 65 mph and only 55 on two lane state highways or rural roads. We have truck congestion on our freeways and roads. They slow things up terribly especially when they merge or the road gets steep. Used to be, if you got into trouble, it was a safe bet a truck driver might help you out. But nowadays, many are on drugs to keep up their intense pace and its not safe to request help of a trucker.

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    1. Also, wanted to add the photos of the falls, both yours and R's, my goodness, make me dizzy, so beautiful though.

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    2. Strayer, your speeds are much the same as ours, although there aren't many freeways with the 110/65 limit. I don't think we have to pay for parking to use a park but you will certainly pay for anything else that goes on within them. Re truck drivers, it is the same the world over, I guess.

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  7. landscape is really interesting I would like to visit it

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    1. One day you might, Gosia.

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  8. Beautiful landscape, love the waterfall !

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    1. Gattina, I had never heard of the falls, so it was a great surprise to me.

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  9. The historic bridge is in Kangaroo Valley. Now you are getting back into my childhood memories, not far from where I grew up.

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    1. Ok CM. I guessed that just from the order of the photos. Google: Ok, Hampden Bridge, opened 1898 and curiously it is a suspension bridge. I might investigate further.

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