Sunday, September 04, 2016

Yarra Walk Pt 2, 1/2

I walked past this industrial site after I completed Part 1 of my walk and I wondered what it was and what the silos stored. This walk I again has to pass by and I smelt an odour that was familiar but not recognisable. It may have been the smell of barley hops, used in brewing. It was once Terry's Brewery, later Barrett and Burston Maltings. I'll never get this post finished if I work on more research about the silos, so I don't really know what it now is.


I think this is an Australian native, a Corea.


And the wattle is in glorious bloom.


Yes, we live in the lucky country, more lucky for some that others.



"The working class can kiss my arse. I've got the bosses job at last".


As a communist, I think all Australians should live in such splendour.


Oh, that looks like some old money up there on the river bank.


I am walking along what once was the working class industrial northern side of the Yarra River in Burnley, looking across to the wealthy area of Toorak.


The street address for these far side buildings is probably St Georges Road.


The Glen Waverley train line crosses here and if travelling left to right towards Glen Waverley, the train will soon reach Heyington Station, probably the train station in Melbourne surrounded by the most expensive property. Sorry about the bad English in the last sentence, but I seem unable to rewrite it.


I initially thought these were apartments, but upon closer inspection, it is one house. I must work harder and longer and with more enthusiasm.


A local private school football team of lads run across the bridge, probably from St Kevin's.


From the far eastern side of the bridge, a train crosses on the way to Glen Waverley.


I liked these greetings on the path.


St Kevin's is on one side of the river and its boat shed on the other side.


Australia's M1 circles Australia mostly along the coast, in Victoria it is generally called the Princes Highway. This is Alt M1, the alternative M1, which is a toll motorway.


And underneath the City Link motorway, this is curious. I think I can see Tibetan prayer flags.


I am not great with the geography of this area. Apparently along the far structure, a bike path bridge, it is very close to Glenferrie Road. Actually the far side of the Yarra River here is Scotch College, one of our most prestigious boys schools.


More boat sheds, I think, and a smart new boat.....what is it called? Not a ramp. Landing? Private! Do no tie up your tin dinghy here and no fish gutting please.



Remember the the litter traps from earlier posts? Here is another.



Up the proletariat. We will win and install a drug addicted single gay black paraplegic father with his ADD children in your mansion. Seriously, the wealth along the river bank astonishes me. I kind of knew it was there but not in such opulence. We have to be talking about homes worth millions of dollars. How do people become so rich? Not by getting up at 5 oรงlock in the morning and working an honest 40 hours a week.


Water has been ordered from our desalination plant, the decision being made before we had one of the wettest winters on record. Nothing to do with global warming though. It is so nice to see things very green. By the end of summer, it will probably be a very brown scene.


Kevin Bartlett was famous Aussie Rules football player, for the team of Richmond, where my great grandfather once played.


Note the cross peering down over the rather ordinary apartment block.


I've almost reached Hawthorn Bridge Wallen Road Bridge, where Swan Street crosses the Yarra River, linking industrial Richmond to the salubrious 'proper' eastern suburbs. Just across the bridge is Melbourne's tram museum, and perhaps surprisingly, I have not visited it. I remember very old trams on our streets, but I will visit the museum one day. Also just across the River is Leonda restaurant. Our Governor General dined there once back in the 1970s not long after in the name of Her Majesty The Queen he sacked our late Labor Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. I was outside Leonda, protesting with others and I think it my first political 'blooding'. Do not accuse the naive 18 year old me of looking for some fun with a university student met at the demo. It did not happen.


16 comments:

  1. Lots of interesting bits and pieces there from the rayed flags to the greetings embedded in the pavement.

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    1. Thanks Marie. It was a long time between Yarra walks. Summer for the first leg and almost Spring for the second.

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  2. Love those greetings - and the photographer's shadow.
    Inherited wealth?
    I know some people get rich, but I am not one of them. And suspect it is too late now.
    I would love to live on the water front though. Almost any water front.

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    1. EC, I think I might to live on a river rather than an ocean. There is always the chance of seeing a platypus. The people who live along the river are not just rich. They must have obscene wealth, which I don't think is so great in our country.

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  3. Lovely photos the bare trees and green ones nice mixture

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    1. Gosia, Australia within its cities has a great mixture of native trees which stay green all year, and overseas trees which lose their leaves.

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  4. Is it funny how the rich always live on the waterfront, I guess floods are our revenge .
    Merle............

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    1. Merle, while I agree with your sentiment, look how high they are above the river level! We aren't talking eroding Sydney beaches.

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  5. I like the greetings path very much. How many languages are on it?
    Like you said, the rich get the waterfront and the rest of us get the dust.
    "I must work harder and longer and with more enthusiasm."
    So you can have an enormous glittery mansion? Where you will then spend most of your money on an army of cleaners to keep it looking good?

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    1. River, I have a better photo of another place where similar greetings in different languages is for the second post. I will try to work it out. If I could afford such place, I could afford some nice looking lads to flit about with dusters all day.

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  6. Nice selection.
    Gosh that white house must be rather large!

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    1. Margaret, Tasmania and family is missing you. It must be nearly time to go home. Yes, the white place is really something.

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  7. They are beautiful homes Andrew but I live by the theory the more you have the more you have to lose ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š I feel exhausted after that walk, how long did it take in actual time? Next time you guys come over we'll go to Fibber McGee's, you'll enjoy it!

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    1. Grace, and that can make you fearful of loos and you want even more money to ensure you can keep what you have. I am sure we would enjoy Fibbers.

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  8. Some of those houses look like mansions or castles! The river litter trap idea is such a good one, wish it would catch on here.

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    1. Strayer, there is certainly some wealth there and like in your country the gap between the rich and the poor is growing. But Trumpet will fix all that :-P

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