Friday, September 30, 2016

Yarra Walk 3 Pt 2

St Crispin was apparently patron saint of shoemakers and part of this building in Johnston Street, Abbotsford was occupied by a shoemaker.


The restoration of the entrance to the old home ground of the Collingwood football team wasn't quite finished when I was last here. The transformation of Victoria Park to a community space is complete and is still usable as a sporting oval.


This was once a very small house, probably two bedroom. Central hallway with the main bedroom at the front and the lounge room to the right. It is now a large house, with a huge two storey addition at the rear.


I am not sure what this piece of art is about, but I like it.



Offices of the Australian Education Union.


I am nearly at the river now. Behind the wall is the Eastern Freeway, a magnificent multi laned road where traffic banks up at each end daily.


I am back at Dights Falls. I decided to walk downstream from here as I wasn't sure how far the path would go until it stops. I was near where the Merri Creek joins the Yarra River and this time my camera was correctly set.


The preceding days had seen some reasonable rain, so the depth of the water flowing over the wall was quite high.


Flotsam or jetsam? Just rubbish really. Under here is the the fish ladder, so that fish can swim upstream.


There was a good sign explaining how the fish ladder works. Naturally it is not a ladder but just a way of the fish being able to swim to the higher level.


The river is quite is flowing faster than I have seen up close.


There was a small natural waterfall here used by the local Wurundjeri Aboriginal tribe to cross the river. To raise the river level for a flour milling, a timber wall was built but in 2012 it was replaced by this concrete wall, including the fish ladder. Although the mill closed down in the early 20th century, the wall was kept to regulate the river levels for about 16 kilometres upstream, used for canoeing, kayaking and other recreational activities. Compare this photo to the second one below where in the Autumn the river level was much lower.



Careful laddie. If you get to close the water will take you over.


The mill's water race is to the left and this was the turbine room for the mill.


Off I go downstream. The river is still very turbulent here.



You can see the river level has been higher quite recently in the following two photos.



Some revegetation works. The matting is only cardboard or similar and will break down in time.


This 20 second video shows the Yarra in flood in November 2011.



15 comments:

  1. Andrew building are great. But I think it was rain last week at your place because water is very dirty in the river

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    1. Gosia, the river is always brown. It carries fine particles of clay which makes is the colour it is.

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  2. Water levels are up here too. To almost unprecedented levels.
    Isn't it noisy as it tumbles down...

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    1. Very noisy EC, but I quite like the sound of rushing water and sea waves.

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  3. Interesting to see the solar panels on the extension to the house. Seems a simple but effective way to revegetate the banks of the river.

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    1. Marie, solar panels have become quite widespread here although Germany seems to have more per house than we do.

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  4. Gosia K, I'll sneak in before Andrew and tell you our river was so murky that visitors were told the mud flowed on top with the clean water underneath. I wish Andrew would stop walking so much, my feet are hurting.

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    1. Jah Teh, yes, it is crystal clear underneath the surface water....maybe. I take it pretty easy on my walks, maybe four kilometres in a couple of hours.

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  5. The pale blue house, once a very small and now much enlarged, is a very smart adaptation of a small block. The alternative response would have been to destroy small Victorian homes and replace them with ugly blocks of impersonal lumping blocks of flats, with no gardens and no access to sunshine in every window.

    Small houses are much more useful to us now, given so many of us are single, retired or now child free.

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    1. Hels, it is a much better outcome for the house and for people. By the size of it now, it could probably hold as many as a few flats.

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  6. Amazing how they've upsized that sweet wee blue cottage, I think they may have gotten a bit carried away 😊 Interesting re the fish ladder, I did not know that. I like the sculpture too, we have good taste Andrew 😊 Your camera was working really well capturing the swollen river, nice work!

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    1. Grace, it was a very dull day so the photos don't show colour so well. I could of course fiddle with them, if I had the time. Yes, fish ladders are used all over the world and very important, although I know salmon can jump up waterfalls by flipping themselves.

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  7. We have fish ladders here also around some dams. Others they capture the fish at the bottom of the dam and transport them around it.

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    1. Strayer, I think collecting might have been what was done before the fish ladder. I can't imagine that the fish who need seawater and salt water were stopped.

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  8. Email your postal address to me I have something to send to you.

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