Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Yarra Walk 3 Pt 1

I took a poor distant shot of this building after the last leg of my walk. This photo is better but it is hard to get a good shot. It is either close up or distant.


It is now a cafe but once a wool scouring business, which produces filthy liquid during the process and the waste flowed straight into the river, along with the refuse from soap making and the unwanted parts of butchered carcasses along with raw sewerage. The river is much cleaner now, but far from perfect.


This house next door is now a business. I wonder if it was the home of the manager of the wool scouring business
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An apartment and business complex on the Yarra where I alighted from the tram. It has the Yarra to east and north as the river makes a right angled turn.


It doesn't look too inviting, but glimpsing a water feature led me in there.



This sculpture is called 'Nuture' by Mike Nicholls.


The water flows right through the whole area down to a lower level.



Down these stairs. Note the gutter to wheel bicycles.


I liked this sculpture. It is called 'The Inspector' by Daniel Agdad. It represents the Victoria Street Rail Bridge with a track inspection machine making its way across the bridge.


From this level steps led down to the river bank. I back tracked a little as I was a couple of hundred metres short of where I finished the last leg.


Jungle!


Last look at the Victoria Street Bridge.


Is it a minor waterway or a drain flowing in to the river.


Could be old and adapted, but I am doubtful. The bluestone of the base was widely used in Melbourne, especially as foundations, but also paving our laneways.


It is all quite well looked after.


Our Eucalypts or gum trees have odd growth habits at times.


I have reached the Walmer Street pedestrian bridge


What? The path ends here? The open path led to a ramp up to street level. Using my phone I looked at where I could rejoin the the path, but gave up and caught the tram along Victoria Street for lunch at a cafe we frequent at times. 


I thought you would like a final photo of our sparkling blue Yarra River. The colour comes mostly from sediment that the river carries down from its catchment.


Korean, I assume dear Watson.


I like speed and trams don't do if for me. Trains are a bit better, so I caught a train back to town.  I thought this under the railway bridge was interesting. In the 70s and 80s, many Vietnamese refugees settled in Richmond. Walking along Victoria Street is almost like being in Vietnam, with the many shops to service the community. It is also a popular dining strip for those who like Asian food, although it has fallen in popularity because of the open drug dealing. This is the Dong Son Drum, a three thousand year old Vietnamese symbol of power.



Part 2 of this last leg of the walk had too many photos, so it will be part 2 and then a part 3.

16 comments:

  1. Andrew I am interested in gum trees. Could write one post about them please. Polish girl..

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    1. Already done Gosia. http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2014/12/gum-trees.html

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  2. Such a varied walk. Clever you for thinking of the use for the gutter on the stairs. I would have assumed it was for water.
    I am sure the owner of the wool-scouring plant lived some distance away, and bet the manager wished he did. Noisy, dirty and on the nose I suspect.

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    1. EC, we saw similar gutters in Japan, but some were actually mini escalators to move bicycles up and down. Yes, hide tanning is not a pleasant process when on a commercial level.

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  3. That third photo! The house is delightful

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    1. John, it is very typical Melbourne architecture from the Victorian period. Kind of Georgian but finished off with Victorian. I would guess about 1880.

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  4. The house in your third photo is now a business (and may have been the home of the manager of the wool scouring business). It seems to have been an archetypal piece of 19th century Australian architecture, surrounded by the most Australian of landscapes - gum trees and the river.

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    1. Hels, you have described it well. Am I drunk or do you too see Georgian aspects to the house with Victorian tacked on?

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  5. As always, enjoyed your photos

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  6. Love that little house of the wool scouring. Must have been a dirty job ! Nice pictures thanks for the "walk" !

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    1. Gattina, aside from knowing scouring generated terrible effluent, I don't really know much about the process, but I suspect you are correct.

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  7. I enjoyed both of the sculptures to day Andrew, particularly 'the Inspector' quirky fabulousness☺ I would like a smaller version of the Dong Son Drum on a chain to empower me 😊😊

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    1. And Grace, you would bang it hard with a drumstick. Now I remember. It is a gong, I think.

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  8. Andrew

    If we are discussing the Georgian "Era", Melbourne was barely started by the time Queen Victoria got onto the throne in 1837. Thus Melbourne has very few (surviving) Georgian houses, churches etc.

    Most Georgian architecture in Australia, therefore, was going to be found only in the original cities - Sydney and Hobart.

    Helen and Joe

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    1. I suppose I was talking about style rather actual period. I probably should check what Georgian architecture looks like, but that was just my instinct.

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