Thursday, August 25, 2016

So hot and stuffy

London's Tube stations are incredibly hot mid summer and so are New York's subway stations. Melbourne's and Sydney's stations are too, if the weather is hot. You hopefully don't want to wait too long in such conditions. Transport for London (TfL) is spending large amounts of money to cool some Tube stations, lines and the trains themselves by various means.

The difference when a New York or Australian train pulls up and the doors open, is wave of cool air falls over you. Generally in London you do not have that experience and it can be hotter in the train than on the platform. However, there are quite a number of new trains do have airconditioning.

But for the very tight tunnels of the deeper tube lines, little can be done at this point.

Remember the Boris Bus from my post back here? Boris is just nickname for the modern Routemaster bus, after former London Mayor Boris Johnston. I think they were built in 2012 and they were certainly on the streets of London when we were last there in 2014. Unbelievably, they were not built with airconditioning. Not only that, they don't have opening windows. There is an air cooling system, but really, can that be possibly effective? It seems not with internal bus temperatures reaching the mid to high thirties on hot days. Ridiculous and absurd.

Does London only have one or two hot days each year? No, 1976 saw 16 consecutive days with temperatures over 30 degrees. Five days saw over 35 degrees. That is close to 100 in the old money. Heat can be very unpleasant to deal with but in southern Australia, a succession of temperatures over 35 would be very unusual. Never mind, everywhere we go, like in New York is properly cooled. High temperatures are not normal for London, but they do happen and they lead to old people dying. That new buses were designed, ordered and bought without airconditioning is a disgrace.

Just thinking aloud, while air can both heat and cool in Australia because it never really drops below zero degrees here, I don't think aircon can effectively heat below zero, so the present heating would probably be needed as well. I assume Boris Buses do have some heating, at least.


17 comments:

  1. It sounds like a classic example of false economy to me. Just the numbers of people on the bus/train can heat it to beyond comfortable.

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    1. EC, indeed. I really dislike things being done on the cheap like that and people will have to put up with them for years.

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  2. I travelled the trains in London and yes they were hot , I was there in late summer, not in New York so can't comment.
    I love my trains in Sydney but not in peak hours.
    Merle............

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    1. Merle, New York is much hotter and more humid than London. I love your trains too when I get to travel on them.

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  3. " in southern Australia, a succession of temperatures over 35 would be very unusual"
    Is that a typo? Don't you mean 'usual'?

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    1. River, we would call it a heat wave and it does happen, but is it usual? Maybe it is.

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  4. I would like to add that in winter, I think our buses (and stores) are overheated. I walk to the bus stops which warms me, then when I get on the bus I often feel too hot, because I've worn a weather proof parka for my walk, so I take things off when I'm on the bus, then have to put them back on when I get off again. Many times I've sat fanning my face on a bus in winter.

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    1. River, in Australia generally I think public transport is better left unheated, as long as it is not draughty. When I go out when it is cold, I still wear minimal clothing so I enjoy the warmth of public transport, but I could adapt.

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  5. Boris and I, once such good friends (because of his red hair and European grandparentage), are no longer talking.

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    1. Hels, under the red hair was mind that did not connect with yours. Such is life.

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  6. ANDREW trains are usually hot but the latest italuan ones which operate in my place have Ac

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    1. Gosia, good to hear about your presumably latest trains and that is now the future.

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  7. I recall travelling from New London CONN USA 123 miles to Penn station off 33rd St New York on St Patricks Day March 17, 65,
    . Green beer plus a sort of Hazy couple of days. left from Grand central snored most of the way. Oh yes the train carriages were double glazed and there was heating, the country station we passed looked !1870ish with big wooden carts for luggage Etc.
    Later on we had dinner on the USS Nautilus which was larger than the ship I was serving on.

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    1. Love it Vest. But what? They don't use wooden carts anymore........I am sure I saw them.......ok, a few years ago.

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  8. With temperatures in the mid 30s this week in Central London, you haven't lived if you've not experienced the tube at rush hour with your face crushed against someone's armpit!

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    1. Delightful, Marie. That is not even pleasant on an airconditioned train. I guess you rarely use buses, but I was amazed that they don't have air con.

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  9. Then there are the armpits that can be smelled from the other end of the carriage, no crushing required (*~*)

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