Monday, August 08, 2016

NBN

Mother has been connected to the fibre optic National Broadband Network (NBN), mind, only her medical alarm alert system. Who knows who is paying for this. She did not ask for it or ask the reason. What a cool mother I have, now connected to the NBN, for her medical emergency alarm at least.

The installer did what he was no doubt instructed to do, scare people into connecting their phone to the NBN. Missus, you need to connect your phone to the NBN before your old phone line is cut off. That had the desired effect of Mother getting into a panic about her phone being cut off. We reassured her. It won't be for five, or ten years but most likely after you are dead. Ok, we did phrase it a little better than that, but that is the essence of it. And Missus, you need a mobile phone as once you are connected to the NBN, your phone won't work if your power is off. Gawd, now Mother, convinced that she will have a heart attack or stroke at home, is banging on about getting a mobile phone, but be assured, her children will not be paying for the ongoing bill.

At least Mother usually runs things past her children before acting. Not so ABI (acquired brain injury) brother. He too was alerted to the need to change to the NBN and went full steam ahead. His home phone no longer works and our large telecom company is paying for his calls to be diverted to his mobile phone, which he normally ignores. You may recall, he has my old phone. There have been a number of visits to his house by phone tech people. He went to the phone shop company to buy a device to fix the mess, but alas they did not have it and directed him to another retailer. He bought the device, I know not what, but to no effect. He was also advised to buy a long phone cord and run it from his kitchen phone to his phone point in his office to make his internet work.

Part of him being ABI is that he is tenacious and demanding and won't let go, and nor he should with a non working home land line and no internet. He has quite happily bashed off to Sri Lanka to watch cricket with the NBN business unresolved, and ready for the first test at Kandy. His cricket tours are fully hosted and expensive, but it the best way for him to travel. He has been to Britain, South Africa and now Sri Lanka with cricket tours. There is some sightseeing.

I am guessing the NBN and its agents are putting pressure on so that the numbers of people connected look good for the government.

We are going to connect to the NBN when our big telco company contract expires soon. I can see everything account wise about her telco connection on the net, but not when our contract expires. I seem unable to get a straight answer on that when calling. I will persevere, but I think it is about in two months time, just when I will be on holidays. Perfect. Our telco was very smart by backbone wiring our building back in 1998 with coaxial cable for the pay tv Foxtel and for cable internet. It has kept us as a cable customer since we have lived here, nearly 15 years.

I only agreed to move to The Highrise because we could get cable broadband back in 2002, as we had been using in our Balaclava house since the late 90s. Well, that and that we would never have to move again. The latter is tenuous, especially since we have learnt of the impact on us from the construction of Metro Rail. R is very troubled about Metro Rail and it seems its construction will have significant impact on us. As it is something like a ten year project, no doubt more on that later.

I think I am right is saying that now our local speed and red light safety cameras have been connected to the NBN as well. Do bother checking online if you can get NBN, but don't take what our Telcos tell you as gospel. Our telco tells us at their website that we are not eligible, when the building has had a large number of NBN devices and cabling installed by TPG, and I think that is who we will switch to.

Connecting red light and speed cameras to the NBN.


Our current cable internet downloads at between 30 and 40 mb per second. Telstra and TPG offer similar NBN internet prices, but Telstra's NBN offer is between 25 and 40 mb. Why would we bother? TPG is offering 100 mb per second for the same price, land line and calls included. A friend in Port Melbourne using his building's TPG NBN wiring is getting a download speed of above 90 mb per second. That is an amazing speed. I care more about reliability and things just working, as required. Never mind. In summary it seems I am about ditch our life time provider, firstly of land lines and internet. Our mobile phones will remain Telstra, for a time, until I work up the energy to change them too.

11 comments:

  1. NBN is moving at Continental Drift speed here. Who knows when connecting will be an option here. Five years? Ten?
    And I am sure you are right about the push to get people connected being positive spin for the guvermint.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, I think you may be surprised how quickly it happens. While the website indicated we couldn't connect to the NBN, confirmed by a Telstra online chat, another Telstra person confirmed what I already knew, that we have it already.

      Delete
  2. Well, I was going to say stuff that EC has already said, so I won't bother now (*~*).
    I wouldn't mind things loading a bit faster here, but like you, I'm mostly satisfied if things are reliably working.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, the same applies as I have said to EC. Yes, reliability is so important. Much as we moan, people in the country are receiving crap service and are second class digital citizens.

      Delete
  3. I haven't checked if we get it here. Our phone lines are so old and awful that the internet is sloooooow.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fen, in that case, I should think your area would be a high priority, especially as you live in a neighbourhood where people of influence reside. I just checked. Sadly you posh people of Haverbrack Avenue folk don't have the NBN.

      Delete
  4. I find it incredible that in this day and age we still have areas of the UK where it is impossible to access the internet. The government have promised that everyone will have access at a reasonable speed but that remains to be seen. Meanwhile I have entered the 21st cent with a smart phone which I seem to be getting on OK except I haven't linked in my emails to the phone. Why? I just don't want to be bothered with them all the time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie, sadly former plans of fibre to the house were dropped in favour of your scheme of fibre to the end of the street, with other methods such as satellites for people in the country. I think you will find the phone useful when you are out and about. It is not a bad idea to treat emails as you would ordinary mail. Check the box once a day....except so little arrives in the mail box now.

      Delete
  5. It's all crap service here, even when you pay a fortune for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cranky, all those private telecommunication companies competing for your business? It is the perfect capitalist model, yet it doesn't work for many people.

      Delete
  6. The Cranky is right. In the US, most of us suffer from being unable to afford internet, or paying extremely high prices. Right now, I have internet, thanks to one brother, but only when and if I can negotiate an affordable deal for the year and speeds are 1.5.to 3 mbps upload and sometimes up to 8 mbps download.

    ReplyDelete