Sunday, June 19, 2016

Yarra River Walk Day 1 Pt 3

Refreshed by coffee, I continued on. In spite of the scenery being pleasant, the impact of the freeway running along the Yarra Valley was always there, with a constant noise of traffic.


Wesley College boat house.


The rowing club of Powerhouse.


Pink granite, I think.


Do you know Australia is a classless society and every servant is as good as his master? The theory might be nice, but it does not play out along the banks of the Yarra.





What is thing called, love? (punctuation can be very important. Say it with different intonations)


Maybe a flood depth gauge? No, I don't think so.


Serenity.


Yep, we are all equal in Australia.


Our authorities look after us well with their guidance lines to prevent us crashing into a gum tree. Pity about our many faded road markings and tram lane clearance road markings in our city.


Come to Australia. You could be living in a place like this with a view of the river. Oh, many are and they are not living in such smart places.



What is this all about. On the northern bank of the Yarra were factories and it was all quite industrial. Not so on the southern bank with expensive housing and mansions. A factory seems to remain.


I had come to the end of the first part of my walk and I needed to get across the river to Burnley Station to get home, but there was no bridge. I walked on. Bugger. For an unfit person, I had walked far enough.


I was slightly diverted by this cycle path diversion.


This litter trap is quite different to the others I have seen but works exactly the same way.


I would like $10 for every time I have driven through this roundabout.


Maybe this bridge at the bottom of Grange Road has a proper name but we call it 'that bridge you use when you get off the freeway because the traffic is crawling'. 


Oh look, it is called MacRobertson Bridge. The philanthropist must have funded it.


I think this is the last decorative bridge along the Yarra. The rest are functional. 


Once crossed, oh the traffic on the bridge. I think I was walking along Barkly Avenue and while there was a footpath, I was in a hideous car dominated environment.


Within this old factory is a working business, but I am not sure if the business is related to the original purpose of the factory.


I walked through the unimaginatively named Bicentenial Park to Burnley Station.


Well, I tried. Burnley has central platforms but I could not work out how to get to them. I used a subway to get under the line but there was nothing on the other side. I went back under the line and looked around and I could not work it out. I went back under once again. I wonder if this narrow walkway leads to an entrance? There aren't signs to indicate so.



It did, and down another subway I went, this time with ramps up to the platform.


24 comments:

  1. Andrew the landscape is really interesting. But I can't believe Australia is a clasless society

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    1. Gosia, while I was partly joking, it does not have the formalised class system of many countries. It doesn't matter so much, as here there is a huge gap between the rich and poor and the gap is growing strongly and no political party seems interesting in doing anything about it.

      Ah John, you have seen our classless society first hand.

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  2. We are indeed equal. Just some of us are a lot more equal than others.
    Smiling at the lane marking round the gum tree. For our protection? Or the tree's.

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    1. EC, depends on the ruling political party. If the party was The Greens, it would be for the protection of the tree. The Liberals, to counter law suits from those who might run into it. Labor, there would probably be a rubber buffer around the tree as well. National Party, the tree would have been chopped down.

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  3. People are people some think they are above others, many just don't care.
    Everyone starts at scratch with me but as time goes on I will form a like or dislike for them but that is based on their actions.

    not their money.
    The river looks a lot cleaner than I remember it but that was a long time ago.
    Merle...................

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    1. Merle, I am the same and while initial impressions are important, it really does take time before you can properly judge people. Technically, the river is much cleaner than it was in the past, but it doesn't look like it to me.

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  4. Nice photos, I do like bridges and parks. How many kilometres did you walk? Are your feet burning? Mine do after a long walk. I don't notice it while walking, but once I've sat down and taken my shoes off, the tingling and throbbing starts and I have to massage them a bit.

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    1. River, about five kilometres, plus some walking to get there and get home. My feet were burning. I have the same problem as you. Stuck under the couch is a thing that sits on the floor and has rollers on it to roll your feet on. I find that helps.

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    2. I must get one of those foot rollers. Can you post a photo so I can take it to the shops and say "I want one of these"

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    3. I've not used it for a while but I think is still under a lounge chair or couch. I will check tomorrow.

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  5. It sounds as classless as America.

    Hmmmm, something about that sentence doesn't seem quite right . . .

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    1. Cranky, you are at the top of the tree for gap between rich and poor. Sadly we are close on your heels.

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  6. Pity the gum tree had bitumen laid right up to its base ~ bound to be a problem no matter how much they tried to save it when they built the road. I have had a similar experience at train stations that I am not familiar with. You would make a good inspector of public transport systems ~ if such jobs even exist.

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    1. I have just finished watching this week's episode if Indian Summer. i had to do some research to understand what was meant by the Untouchables, only to find out that there are untouchables in many cultures around the world. It made we think again whether there were any parallels here in AUS. a class system denotes something we are born into. There are certainly kids who are born into families where there are multiple generations of welfare and have never known work and already don't imagine a life of work for themselves. I see them at work and I am not sure what we can do about it. I have also been watching the series called Revolution School on iView about Kambraya College in Melbourne. You might know more about the geographical area where Kambraya is situated that denotes a class by postcode.

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    2. Carol, I think the tree will get adequate water from the unpaved side and surely the tree will break up the bitumen as its trunk grows? Yes, some good signage is needed there.

      You would have noted that the government of India outlawed the status of untoucbable. But of course they still exist, just not in a formal classification. The jobs they do defines there class. Multiple welfare generations is a huge problem in Britain, less so here I think, but yes, I am sure exists and you are at the coal face. If only they would accept and embrace education, they would get rid of that mentality, but I am sure generally, they don't. Yes, I have been watching the tv show on Our ABC. I did not realise it was set in here. Let me check. Ok, Berwick. That surprises me. It is on a new housing estate but Berwick is a very old town, the original part quite nice on a steep hill and........well demographics change. Believe me, there are much worse areas in Melbourne than Berwick and I am quite surprised.

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  7. I have crossed the MacRobertson Bridge back and forth for year after year. The light pillars were once Deco and gorgeous. Now they are intact, but a bit tatty.

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    1. Hels, I guess most of the bridges are the responsibility of Vic Roads, not the sort of place you think of as looking after heritage. I once emailed City of Melbourne about so many lights not working on Princes Bridge and the reply was that they are the responsibility of the electricity company.

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  8. I am thoroughly enjoying your walks. Don't you find walking somewhere that you usually pass by car gives a whole new perspective on the area. Those litter traps are such a great idea. I have never seen them here unless you consider an upended supermarket trolley to be in that category.

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    1. Maria, I would be surprised if there aren't similar traps in the Thames. I rode my bike to the beach a couple of times a few years ago, and even as I wobbled along, I saw so much more than I ever have from the car. When walking, you don't even need to stop to admire as your pace is slow.

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    2. I knew I would do it sooner or later, type the name of R's sister and not yours. Of course, Marie.

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  9. I think the 'class system' here is more about how you treat people than about how much money you have. A bit idealistic I know but there are many people out there with pots of money and no class and vice versa. I do love an ornate bridge, not many in Perth, I'll have to investigate :) the only one I can think of is the heritage listed Horseshoe bridge in the city..Do you still ride your bike much Andrew?

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    1. Ah yes Grace, Rose is leaving Perth. I thought the Horseshoe Bridge was new? Sadly no about the bike. I pump up the tyres once a year though with the thought that I will ride again soon.

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    2. Andrew the Horseshoe Bridge is over a hundred years old, it's gorgeous. I was a bit worried when the started the link between the city and Northbridge that they might try and knock it down. There would have been many people chained to the bridge in protest, mine included :)

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