Thursday, June 09, 2016

Spell Checking

I think I was a slightly above average speller before the advent of spell checkers. Now I am just confused. Where it is possible, I choose the Australian spell checker, but that choice is rare. Mostly I change the spell checker from US English to UK English, as UK English is much closer to how Australians spell, but not entirely.

It really does do your head in when you type and word and it is underlined in red, indicating it is a wrong spelling. Umm, I think that is the way I have spelt it all my life. Is it wrong? I go to google to check and that usually gives me a clear answer, ie, British or US spelling, but not always.

Take the word.....I am shaking in trepidation as I type.....accidently. Wrong!!! That has a red underline, yet it came so naturally from my fingers. Spell checker tells me it should be accidentally. That looks odd to me. In this case, from my googling, it does not seem to be a particularly British or US difference as both spellings are used in both countries.

I have added many Australian spellings to our new computer and to Blogger, but I really have no confidence that what my fingers type automatically is correct.

And if I do genuinely spell something wrongly and the spell checker picks it up, I then use Google to correct the spelling. In the past I would have looked up a dictionary and learnt how to spell the word. What I do with Google is just correct the spelling and my brain does not retain the spelling.

I conclude, spell checkers are helpful with your writing and but not helpful to your spelling skills.  Not sure why, but the spell checker here won't accept the word learnt. Assuming blogger uses an American spell checker, don't Americans spell learnt as such or not use the word at all?

I am working on a a photo heavy post, so this is your bloomin' lot for today.

20 comments:

  1. Learnt isn't one I use, but dictionary.com claims it:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra, I kind of gathered it wasn't. I learned something? It sounds just wrong to me.

      Delete
  2. My spell checker is turned off, if I'm not sure of a word, I get my dictionaries out. Learnt is correct, but most Americans use learned. And I always type accidentally, never even seen accidently anywhere.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, I think my spelling of the word accidently is perhaps unusual in Australia. No idea why I spell it like that.

      Delete
  3. I would not worry over the spell checking although sometimes when my spell check is not working I become annoyed but add a rider at the bottom of the post "Spell check down" Good post!.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Vest. I think like River, I would do better without spell checkers.

      Delete
  4. Sandra. Learned is my choice I cringe at Learnt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vest, it is the opposite to me. I would cringe slightly if I heard someone say, What have you learned today, and surely you wouldn't reply when ask about a fact with, I learned it. Or maybe you would.

      Delete
  5. Learnt here. Sadly I agree on the spell checker front. And there are some words I am unable to retain. Preceeding is one of them. I almost always put that extra e in it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, I have heaps of words of which I can never remember the spelling. About a decade ago I sat down and concentrated on the word necessary, as it was necessary for me to know how to spell it correctly. Another was parallel, which I had to know for work.

      Delete
  6. Then there are those times when the spell checker is of no use, like when I misspell a word, but the misspelled word is actually another word, correctly spelled. One of my favorites: Untied Airlines.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed Walt, often applies to mere typos, which I am sure your example is.

      Delete
  7. Spelling that isn't in the Oxford dictionary drives me nuts. If students have spelling errors (not accidental typos) in their work, I read their writing already in a bad mood.

    I am not happy with American grammar or slang either, but bad spelling is worse.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hels, according to popular thought, that is what reporters for the Herald Sun report, standards of written English by tertiary students is appalling. Unless you are constantly in a bad mood by how your students write, then maybe things are not so bad.

      Delete
  8. I agree, I don't think they help me learn the correct spelling permanently. It's too easy to mindlessly correct it, right click and left click on the correctly spelled version. We have so little use for our brains anymore.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Precisely Strayer, but our brains are busy with other things.

      Delete
  9. I'm the worlds worse speller and admit it.
    Merle..........

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merle, that is part of your charm and everyone loves you for your naturalness.

      Delete
  10. I use the UK English always as I'm not American.
    I'm always making spelling mistakes often due to my fingernails.
    Learnt, I used to use that word a lot once and it's a little annoying that spell check rejects it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, well you aren't English either, but I guess your heritage is. I am impressed that any errors you make are because of your gorgeous fingernails. It is a perfect legitimate reason.

      Delete