Thursday, May 05, 2016

Perth Day 5

Nasty man Sir Charles Court, former Premier of Western Australia. While he was not as bad as Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen, he was was quite despotic enough.


Where had our shared platter tow nights ago in the upmarket The Terrace in St Georges Terrace.


Another building with castellations.


The first Bishop of Perth. As I said on FB at the time when I used the photo there, he is having a rather ta-dah moment. Note the height of his hand, a little less than hip height. The next time we passed the good Bishop, a lad and lass were acting a little secretively at the statue. Straight away we realised what they were up to. He had his crutch positioned over the hand as his girlfriend took a photo.


On to the doctor's surgery at the Perth Station building. More anti-biotics and I was soon feeling much better. Boy was the doctor expensive though. To see my own doctor I pay $73 and Medicare gives me back $37. This doctor charged $95 and still only $37 back. Had I have had more time, I would have looked for a bulk billing clinic where the patient pays nothing.


Well, here we are at Perth Station. We did not buy an electronic stored value card as we normally do when travelling but just paper tickets. Fremantle is in Zone 2, cost $4.50. $1.80 for R. With the exception of a new line, Perth's suburban system does not run out too far and the simple map above the window was uncomplicated and easy to read. There were audible and visible next station announcements. I was puzzled by all of the trains displaying, stopping all stations including Showgrounds.


It never quite struck me that the sea we saw yesterday is the Indian Ocean. Marvellous. I hope this is not a bridge to get to a train station. It is a long walk.


The train crossed the bridge over Swan River adjacent to the Queen Victoria Street bridge for motor cars. Further upstream is the main Stirling Highway Bridge. It quite a slow trip to Fremantle as the train stopped at every station and the stations are quite close.


Perth's port town of Fremantle is certainly a working port. There are regular complaints in the media about the truck traffic generated by the port and there is a very long term plan to alleviate the matter.


You could snap away all day at old buildings in Fremantle and still not capture them all. This is the Post Office, which amazingly still contains a post office, a rare situation these days. I expect Fremantle with its old buildings survived by neglect rather than intent.


R had been to Fremantle several years ago and seemed more knowledgeable about the town than myself, so I did not do any checking before we arrived aside from the transport. I asked him if the market he wanted to visit was in an old railway shed. He said yes and we headed for the old railway shed and he proclaimed that E Shed Market was not the one he had in mind. Some googling and I found where he meant. It was quite warm as we wandered up Market Street and then South Terrace. We stopped at a bakery near the market for lunch. R did know all about the Cappuccino strip.

Now, being Saturday, Fremantle was very busy. At home I would not recommend a visit to the Melbourne tourist drawcard seaside city of St Kilda and if I was a Perth local, I would probably avoid Fremantle at weekends. The crowds became a little annoying but not nearly as much as the roar of motorbikes. It was hardly a relaxing and peaceful experience and I really wished I had a gun and could take them out one by one. This is probably a re-puposed old hotel. Very nice indeed.


Fremantle Technical School, now Technical and Further Education, TAFE.


The entrance to market is at the side from Henderson Street, which may be a normal street at times but for the weekend, a mall. A busker was setting up. The market was terrific and reminded me of Adelaide's market. It was not too big and everything could be easily seen seen including the quite interesting food area. There was a man selling some plastic hand thrown flying things, one of which he threw out into the crowd and invariably with repeated throws it returned to him. Many white former South Africans live in Perth, and maybe one or two from Zimbabwe, so it was no surprise to see some food they may have eaten in the countries of their birth, and I did not note down the name but as best as I can recall it was something like Drowears. Anyone know?


The busker had a big crowd and we watched for a while, along with several thousand other people.


I'll get to buses later but Fremantle has a free bus service around the city with two routes. There was a bus stop outside the market, so we hopped on the bus and made a circuit of the inner area. I think the nearby High Street coffee strip was where locals might go for their coffee and brunch. I would not blame them for avoiding the very busy South Terrace. Terrific old buildings, one after another after another.


We left the bus at the station and bought tickets for the return journey. R chatted to an English tourist and her daughter who were sitting next to him.


I was poised to take photos of some interesting murals I had seen from the train on the way down, but I missed them. The train, while lovely and cool and clean, only had sideways seats which I really don't like.


I did catch this old sign. Does anyone have a memory of Dingo Flour? A dingo is an Australian native dog like like creature.


We arrived back at the station and I had installed a map of Perth's free CAT bus routes on my phone when back in Melbourne, City Area Transit or something like that. There are four routes and I found the one that would take us near to our apartment. We still had to cross the freeway on the pedestrian bridge though. We walked past these metal sculptures many times before we just missed the traffic lights and I had time to take a photo.


This is the bridge across the freeway, leading to the very steep Mount Street, rising to Kings Park at the top. Our apartment was just along on the right.


It is a lovely street and imagine it in early summer with the jacarandas in full bloom. Note the retro street lamps. They seemed in good repair to us, but along came a crew of two and painted them all, along with rubbish bins and other street furniture.


A Melbourne person had told us we simply must visit the casino at Burswood, the only place in Perth that has pokie machines. I am not sure why. It is like any other Australian casino. Boring and a little depressing. We caught a taxi there and back, $23 each way, and had a fairly ordinary meal, albeit cheap. There was no reason to hang around and so we were soon back to our apartment.

19 comments:

  1. I find casinos, here operated only by the native tribes, depressing also, people hunched over machines, feeding their money in, like zombies. Like burning money, I can't help but think. That pedestrian bridge is extremely long. Did you walk it? I love your comment about wanting a gun to shoot the bikers one by one, to silence their noise. That is funny. You watched the busker along with a thousand others? My goodness I don't think I could tolerate such crowds.

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    1. Strayer, yes, they are depressing places and I never understand the attraction. Here you can use poker machines in many hotels, which is a little better. The bridge was just a photo I took from the train and we did not use it. I could sit on my balcony and take out noisy motorcycles too. A thousand is an exaggeration, but it was very busy.

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  2. Iive never seen photos of modern perth....the only time ive seen it was in the film " Australia" and that was based in the 1940s

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    1. John, it is quite a lovely city. I don't know of that 40s film.

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  3. I really liked the little bits of Perth and Freemantle I saw (on a work trip donkey's years ago). Did you get to Rottnest Island?

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    1. EC, we did get to island two days later, the day before we left.

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  4. Yes Freeo is a bit of a tourist trap, but it is sooo cool. Your photos of the old hotel, market and post office etc show terrific buildings, all heritage protected I hope.

    And another thing. When all our families arrived in Australia by ship, their first port of call was Freeo. Most people remember that city very fondly because they knew they were safe.

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    1. Hels, yes, it is a significant town for the reason you describe. I bet it was quite different when so many Euro immigrants arrived.

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  5. A gun?? Really? Were they that annoying? Think of them instead as an exciting part of your holiday.
    The stations maps inside the trains are the same as we have here in Adelaide. Does Melbourne not have such maps?
    I'm glad you liked Fremantle, all those gorgeous old buildings, so well maintained to. I had a great time wandering around the E shed market and the one in Fremantle.
    If I didn't have kids here in SA I might have decided to stay there.

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    1. River, they are deafening and you can't hear anyone as the bikes pass by. We have more train lines and they don't really fit on a map like that. We probably should have visited the E Shed markets. There seemed to be quite a number of people there.

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    2. Yes, I need to eat my words. Today I was deafened by the roar of only two bikes as they sped along Grenfell Street though traffic. Normally I don't mind the sound of bikes, but these two were excessively loud.

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  6. Drowears! No idea, but I'm coming back later to see if anyone else knows what that is :) I love nipping down to Freo, through the week not the weekend :) you got some fab photos of heritage buildings Andrew, so many more than in Perth.

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    1. Grace, it gets close to being a totally preserved town, and as I suggested, probably because no developer could see a profit in knocking things down and building something new.

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  7. What are those metal things in the that roundabout?
    Never heard of Dingo Flour.
    The Dr. was expensive, must have known you was a tourist.
    Interesting to see more of the area.

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    1. Margaret, yes, being a tourist and its convenient location at the main train station. The metal things don't show very well but they are kangaroos. Once you know, you can see them.

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  8. Looks as if you had a real nice and interesting trip, except that you didn't feel well. It's strange to see the old buildings they just look like the once in the UK (of course)

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    1. Gattina, back then we very much copied the UK in many areas. Now it is more the US but we do still copy the UK now too.

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  9. Lots of interesting buildings in Freemantle but doubt I will get there to see them even though I do have a nephew living there now, it's just too far. Have they changed the laws in Freemantle to allow visitors to take pop shots at passing motor cyclists? If not maybe you should offer that suggestion to the tourist board. Sorry to hear you were unwell, terrible timing. Dingo flour??? That name just doesn't do it for me.

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    1. Marie, as I said earlier, arguably it is the world's most isolated city. What a great suggestion for the tourist board

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