Monday, April 18, 2016

Non activist

I may be gay but generally I am not a gay activist. I feel somewhat more strongly about religious groups, not just lobbying, but pressuring politicians and companies. It is within the right of the Catholic church and our democratic system to do so, but we will judge such institutions by what they do.

Telstra is one of hundreds of Australian companies to pledge support for marriage equality through AME's campaign. Its logo featured in full page newspaper advertisements published last year. At the time, many of those corporations were contacted by the Catholic Archdiocese of Sydney, which urged them to reconsider their public support.
 
There was a justifiable backlash against Telstra. Telstra walks on a thin edge with me, as the NBN company who has set up in our building is hunting for customers. Telstra not being pro gay might just tip me over the edge.
 

16 comments:

  1. Here in the U.S., I refuse to patronize the fast-food chain Chick-fil-a, which has publicly come out against marriage equality. My boycott hasn't exactly driven the company to the brink of bankruptcy, but I feel better about it.

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    1. Kirk, clearly the chain sees a business reason for its decision. While I don't know, how powerful is the Latin Catholic vote in certain areas?

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    3. Oh, these are Southern Baptists we're talking about here. The chain is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. The company's mission statement is "To glorify God by being a faithful steward of all that is entrusted to us. To have a positive influence on all who come in contact with Chick-fil-A." Sounds kind of comical, but it's apparently sincere. Not that there can't be a business aspect to all this. There's been a backlash to marriage equality here, and the chain has capitalized on that. Organized attempts to boycott or protest Chick-fil-a has been met with counter-protests put together by the chain itself, which what I understand has been an increase in sales. But I'm not part of those protests. I just don't eat there. But, yeah, there's money to be made in bigotry.

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  2. I trust they do the right thing. I believe in marriage equality. I don't do a lot of protesting either and if so, it's usually animal rights:)

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    1. Sandra, animal rights is closer to my heart than anything.

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  3. Like Kirk, I 'vote' with my dollars... besides, I make a better version of Chick-fil-a's famous sandwich here at home so why throw my money to a bunch of homophobes.

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    1. Cranky, I am quite sure anything you make would be nicer than chain food.

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    2. Andrew, that is quite the sweetest thing which has been said to me in quite a while... thank you!

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  4. Andrew it is a controversial topic in many countries. But I think your point of view is good

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  5. I saw that. Interesting that money drove both of Telstra's decisions. Or more accurately the fear of having it taken away.
    Which makes me doubt that there is any ethical commitment at all.

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    1. EC, I guess it boils down to business and profits without much ethics involved.

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  6. Telstra has always been on a thin edge with me and it's not what they surport it is because I've been a customer and they are crap most of the time.
    Merle.......

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    1. Merle, and charge us dearly for what we get.

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  7. I went away from Telstra long ago, I don't like them one bit

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