Sunday, March 20, 2016

Sunday Selections

River may not join us this week for Sunday Selections, but others will participate.

Nothing too exciting to post today. Just a few photos I took about a month ago when walking in South Yarra.

Strange building, I think converted to a house. I wonder what it was. The brickwork on the set back looks original.


Hard to work out what it may have been. Clearly not a normal house.


Some strange little windows. Although the lintel looks original, the brickwork and mortar around the window are more recent.


There doesn't appear to have been any change at this window.


And nor at this one, except there seems to be a metal lintel, so perhaps the window was just cut in and the sill bricks look modern.


At the rear you can see a massive lintel and new brickwork below it. There was a very large opening there for some reason. Was it a stable?


This house, perhaps because of its colour, has always grabbed our eye, quite unlovable as it is. It's one bedroom and from memory the asking rent was around $650 pw.


And this where these horses and carts should operate, not on our busy city streets. There are something like forty of them now. They are all getting quite out of hand.


The tall building with the dominating white lift towers in my blog header photo is Domain Park Flats, designed and built in 1962 by Robin Boyd. It was certainly innovative and stood a little higher than Edgewater Towers, which I featured in last year's Open Day post. In fact it was Melbourne's tallest residential building and aimed at high end own your own buyers. An artist and critic criticised the two lift towers as "monstrous excrescences". Oh my, how I would like montrous excrescence. I am just not sure how.

I do rather wonder who was slipped what for permission for such a dominant building to be constructed amid low rise housing.


Peering into the public areas from the outside, it appears to be quite original. There is a mix of 2,3 and 4 bedroom flats. I recall the rear getting a makeover, maybe in the 1990s. Olive trees were a curious choice but I guess they are ok. Underneath the rear is carparking as there is on the level of the trees.


They all seem very well cared for. I heard that Una Fraser, mother of our former and late Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser lived in one.


Certainly not flashy or glitzy though. The higher flats would have nice views over the Botanic Gardens and probably of the city.


Can't see a lot of the public area in the photo. A quote from Wikpedia "with all internal joinery finished in flat-polished walnut". One does like one's walnuts polished. It was Melbourne's first high rise housing to incorporate air conditioning, very advanced for the 1960s.


What is not very evident is that the building is very shallow, that is it does not go back far, only two rooms deep perhaps. That might be visible if you expand this photo.


Ok, heading back home, past  St Thomas Aquinas Church. We can see the side and rear from home. It is all front.


Oi Bro, Lets Chill? How very un-Melbourne Grammar like.


An increasingly popular way to move young children around. Can't we go back to the old days where you could just give them the tram fare? In my day we were so poor, we only had our father's back to ride on.


17 comments:

  1. Your father had room on his back for you? Or did you climb on the load of wood and foodstuffs?
    I don't remember ever walking around the neighbourhood with my parents. We had free rein in the local area. And I don't think either of my parents COULD (or would) ride a bike...

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    1. EC, ours was very similar to yours. We would roam but not with our parents. While the cycled when younger, not after we were born.

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  2. $650 a week for ONE bedroom??
    The brick conversion may have once been a storage warehouse for a department store, possibly for furniture and whitegoods, it has that look about it. How do they fit in three or four bedrooms if that highrise is only two rooms deep? They must be laid out similar to ranch-style housing I guess.
    I was awake early because of cats fighting nearby, so put together a quick Sunday Selection.

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    1. Ridiculous price, I agree River. I was surprised to learn about there being multiple bedrooms, and as you say, it must be ranch style, unless some are two storey, but I doubt that.

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  3. Andrew I love unusualbuildings so the first building is charming I would like to live there

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    1. Andrew did you find out what the first building was? Clearly not a normal house, a red brick cubic shape with barely any windows. Even for a non-domestic building eg a warehouse, that would be very UnMelbourne.

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    2. Gosia, it is quite unusual.

      I did not Hels, but I would like to know so I may follow that up. Nearby and now residential, was Maples warehouse, but it was much larger. I have mentioned Maples twice in my blog.
      http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2007/08/maples.html
      http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2007/06/maples.html

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  4. That does look an unusual first building. It had a slight look of a small warehouse where they would haul goods up to the top floor. High rise blocks, some you love and some you hate. Mainly the 60s architecture is not something to be proud of but air conditioning must have been quite something at that time.

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    1. Marie, I wonder if wasn't a very grand stable. No, I think you are close to its purpose. No, I am not a fan of 60s architecture although I don't mind interiors at times.

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  5. The first house is a bit weird, but at least a roof over ones head and 4 walls, more than some people have.
    That's a bit steep the rent!

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    1. Margaret, I expect it is very nice inside. Yes, expensive rent because of the area, which I admit is very nice.

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  6. A lot of old buildings are being turned into homes these days. I love watching Restoration man on TV.

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    1. Diane, I like those sort of shows too. Oh for the time to watch them.

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  7. That first brick building .. A fire station or electrical substation. When you find out, do let us know. The church is interesting architecture .. I wonder what period and origin it is from?

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    1. Carol, an old substation is the best suggestion yet. It does look like a substation. The church is kind of Moorish/Spanish, yes? But only at the front. The rest is very plain. I must go in one day but churches give me indigestion.

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  8. The high rise building looks quite tall but narrow in the first photo you share of it, and seems to me its stability might be of question, but since its been around since the 60's, there's no question by now. So lots horse drawn carriages there? Who cleans up?

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    1. Strayer, the architect was quite famous and designed many 'different' buildings and I've never heard the soundness of works called into question, so I think it would be safe. The horses have bags that hang under the tails but they are not 100% effective. Sometimes the drivers pick up but they don't always notice what comes out when they are driving.

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