Sunday, March 13, 2016

Sunday Selections

I usually join with River and some others in Sunday Selections. This week, again an assortment of odds and sods.

I remember it was a Saturday, maybe around four o'clock and the parking area at Station Pier for travellers on the Spirit of Tasmania seemed rather chaotic.


The appointed time to begin loading cars began and slowly cars moved onto the ship but more kept arriving.


There were a large number of motorcycles, most with Queensland number plates, travelling on to Tasmania.


The adjacent Princes Pier is not a working pier but it has been restored. The chimney belongs  to the gas fired Newport Power Station, normally only used to supplement the power supply


Midnight one New Year's Eve was spent on the rooftop of a nearby highrise block of apartments. We could see many different fireworks going off around the city, but my favourite was the one going off at this small lighthouse.


Something about this bird looked familiar. I was sure I had looked it up before so why could I not remember what it was? It has a very distinctive beak and once home I realised it is a Pacific Gull, but a juvenile, hence the brown colouring instead of being black and white.


Back home and oh no, it is that time of the year again. Blasted Grand Pricks. Extreme traffic congestion during the set up/take down process. Noise from cars and helicopters. Gattina's Mr G will be glued to his television set. I'll wave to him from my bedroom window.


We were at the back of the clock in Melbourne Central, a place I loath, and I never knew there was little faux animated feature at the back of the clock.


Fortunately we still have some normal toy shops around. I hate the way the big department stores are just dominated by kid's movie characters. There is little else to buy in such stores than something related to a tv show or a movie. I'd like to smash her with a sledge hammer and see her fall apart into individual blocks. But oh, I suppose the kiddies would cry.


Dear tree woollie makers, your efforts are grand, but better you do it for winter and keep the sap warm than in summer.


20 comments:

  1. Smiling at your comment about the yarn bombers. Our arboretum does wrap some of its trees in winter. And in the city the yarn bombers hit the lamp posts.

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    1. EC, I can't remember seeing lamp posts covered. I guess deciduous trees do need that cold period where they are dormant and do nothing. With your low overnight temperatures in winter, I thing some more exotic trees would need wrapping.

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  2. Andrew I always admirew your palm trees. And trees covered by wool are lovely

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    1. Gosia, I had not even noticed them in the photos. Yes, there are quite a few.

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  3. Yarn bombers are a funny interesting sort, I think. Colorful and mysterious.

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    1. Strayer, what is their motivation? Clearly some work goes into such things.

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  4. Lots of other big cities either didn't plant trees in the wide boulevards in their central business district, or pulled them out as development progressed. Or petrol fumes from buses poisoned their trees... and their pedestrians.

    Greater Melbourne has 4.25 million people yet the trees still look green and relaxing. Ditto the green trams.

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    1. Hels, remember the argument when Swanston Street was last redeveloped, plane trees or natives. Thank god commonsense won over and plane trees were used and they are maturing very nicely. The sad think is to look at an aerial map of Melbourne and see how few trees there are in the northern and western suburbs, compared to the eastern and southern.

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  5. Is that an old photo or is it yarn-bombing time again already? I love seeing the colours everywhere.
    I like the back of the clock image with the tiny koalas.
    I'm envious of your power supply supplement station, nothing like that here as far as I know. All we have is an inadequate grid supply that draws power from across the border when it can't produce enough on its own. I don't really know how that works.
    Did you hang around long enough to see how many vehicles fit onto the Spirit of Tassie?

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    1. River no, new photos. Yarn bombing happened at least a month ago. Power trading between states is all big business. Tasmania nearly drained the hydro reservoirs to sell power to the mainland and now there power cable has broken and they don't have enough water to generate enough power. It is a shocking system, built on profits. At times SA contributes to the country's power supply. As a cool change comes through SA, you switch your air con off, but it is still hot here, so you will be selling power to us. No, we couldn't really see the cars go on to the boat. They seem to go in at the side or the front as commercial vehicles were using the main loading opening.

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  6. I find yarn-bombing very cheering but you're right, it seems more appropriate for winter than summer. Do excuse me whilst I continue feasting my eyes on all your green.

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    1. Cranky, what green? So I took a look. Yes, there is plenty. We haven't had a bad summer really.

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  7. Great selection you have Andrew.
    All those motorcycles did indeed come to Launceston and were parked at Aurora Stadium on the other side of town...so many of them.

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    1. Margaret, how cool. That was I think Saturday a week ago. The other side of town is the best place for them.

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  8. there must be a very active group of yarn bombers in Melbourne. I remember noticing a number of structures that had been yarned when I visited.

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    1. Marie, and they are getting better at their craft, with nice bright colours and tight fitting garments that seem to last quite well. Have you noted the price of balls or wool? So expensive, so I do admire their efforts.

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  9. So you don't like F1, Lego and yarn ... LOL (grumpy old man)

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    1. I dislike the GP and everything it stands for. Lego is fine. It is the department store marketing machines I am not fond of.

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  10. And here's me thinking that yarn bombing was just a fun decoration, I didn't realise there was deeper motivation :) I remember getting tres excited once when I took photos of an adult Pacific gull, gosh the beak was amazing!

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    1. Grace, so the question is why do they need such strangely shaped beaks?

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