Tuesday, March 08, 2016

An important train event

The Flying Scotsman visited and travelled extensively in Australia for our bi centenary in 1988, or as Aboriginals might like say, the anniversary  of invasion day in Australia. I think it then went on to the US to tour there.

Subsequently it was owned by a number of people but some years ago it was bought by the Britain's national railway museum in York. It has been restored over a ten year period at an extraordinary cost of around AU$6 million (that figure is dubious. It could have been more or less).

While it has been out on the rails, presumably for testing and driving experience, last Thursday Thursday before last, it made its inaugural post restoration official run from London's King Cross Station to York. Crowds turned out to see the steam train that in 1924 could travel at 100 mph, 160 km/h.  Let me see what clips I can find that are both brief and have colour.

1:11



Constant noise from helicopters was a bit annoying. 1:24



Good to see some women enthusiasts. 2:16



Britain's Channel 4 had quite a good video that very oddly, I noticed my step mother liked on FB. but I can't find it on You Tube and it is complicated to embed from FB. Forget the above videos. Here is quite a good one from Sky News. What you do see in all of the videos is speed. I love fast trains, or at least those that give a perception of speed. I am a train version of Toad of Toad Hall. 1:30
NB Designed by Sir Nigel Gresley. Must check for an update on the Gresley ducks.




35 comments:

  1. Is that coal its burning to power the steam engine? That is an impressive train, almost unreal, spewing its steam as it goes, like a true iron horse, or, dragon. We had another train death in Albany, someone hit near the train station. No further details have been released. We have lots of train deaths here.

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    1. Stayer, indeed coal is burnt. I doubt wood would ever burn hotly enough. Many train deaths are suicides and if details are not released, there is a good chance that was one.

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    2. It was a suicide. Very sad. Woman was homeless and in a wheelchair.

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  2. I heard one of its engineers being interviewed on the radio this morning.....i would love to see the old girl when she tours the country this year

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    1. John, yes I suppose she will visit all corners of British mainland. She really is the best known train in the world, with maybe Thomas as an exception.

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  3. There is a real charm to steam trains. Much like the romance of old ships...

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    1. EC, yes, and not just the train but the old train travel experience.

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  4. wow IO love them mainly Flying Scotsman

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    1. Gosia, next time you are in England, try to see it.

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  5. The British National Railway Museum is fascinating, but going on the original train trip would have been even better. I know there is still a service using the same name these days, but it is express. I prefer luxury train trips in Scotland etc, stopping at royal palaces, fortresses and whiskey distilleries en route.

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    1. Hels, that sounds like my kind of holiday. I saw an ad the other day for the luxury trip from China to Russia for only $38,000!

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    2. River, for me it would mean taking out a mortgage, for you, rather a lot of saving from your modest income.

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  6. Best known train, oh, now that would be the Hogwarts Express. Get with the times Andrew.

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    1. Jah Teh, you know I am just an old fashioned girl from an old fashioned world.

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  7. I must say that when I find something good that it usually says where to share but Blogger is never mentioned. We've been shunted off to the corner as old fashioned.

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    1. Yes, quite so. I never follow those share links. You know if I watch a porn clip, I can share it to FB!

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  8. Andrew, I'm hoping to take a trip on The Flying Scotsman in May. I think it's scheduled to go to Canterbury but I might get off at Margate if it will allow us.
    I tried to see it off the other week but didn't get up in time when it showed up at Kings Cross.
    Never mind I'll be seeing it soon, hence a nice big blog post.

    Oh shucks, you've done all your comment replies.

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    1. Deejohn, I always reply at least once, unless I don't. I once heard someone say, never get off a train at Margate. I am guessing you won't be paying £450. As impressive as the train is, how good is the British enthusiasm about it.

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    2. Andrew, There's great enthusiasm here. I think train fans were really annoyed that on the actual day of it's first run to York the day's story got virtually buried on the TV news because it was the same day that the BBC published it's findings and apology for all the sexual abuse that was going on at the BBC in the 1970/80's. They basically turned a blind eye to it all but won't admit it.
      (Sadly Rolf Harris was among them as well as half a dozen popular disc jockeys).
      But last night the BBC treated us to two wonderful documentaries on the Flying Scotsman with all the film footage of it's inaugural run.
      But no I think we're paying just over £100 for our trip.

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    3. No doubt the BBC was hoping the story about itself would be buried by the train story. Probably the same all over the world but our governments are prone to releasing bad news stories on Friday evenings.

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  9. That is one beautiful engine! Love the billowing clouds of steam.
    I read once that in a steam train it's best to get a seat in the first carriage as far forward as you can, because the steam and soot clouds don't start to settle until the first two carriages have sped past, the back carriages are the ones that get enveloped in it and if you have your windows open, you'll get covered.
    Possibly doesn't matter with more modern carriages where the windows don't open.

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    1. Wise advice River. Now, what sort of trains were running between Port Pirie and Adelaide when you were but a lass? You sound experienced.

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    2. Diesel engines with what was then called "streamlined" carriages. I'll see if I can google a photo or two. Or there may be some pictures in a couple of books I have about Port Pirie and its history.

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    3. The first diesel engine didn't arrive in Port Pirie until 1963,according to the books, so we must have arrived in 1957 by steam train.

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  10. Enjoyed every video immensely Andrew, what an iconic train, how brilliant it would be to take a trip aboard this beauty! Merci beaucoup for showing.

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    1. Grace, you are not experienced about steam trains. If you are taking a trip on a steam train, you are in a carriage and unless you are interested, you would be quite unaware of what is up front and pulling you along. A nice comment though, of course.

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    2. Do the carriages have windows? That's what I meant, just sitting looking at the view out of the windows like what you do on trains Andrew :)

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    3. Yes, quite so. Staring out the window is one of the pleasures of train travel.

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  11. What an event it must have been ! A pity that I didn't see it ! And now we have trains which run 3 times faster !

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    1. Gattina, I don't normally swear, but not in fucking Australian we don't. I think Eurostar is now running through to Amsterdam. Thalys must hate that.

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  12. I don't suppose there's any chance The Flying Scotsman will ever make an appearance here in Adelaide :(

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    1. River, it travelled widely in 1988 and I expect it visited South Australia.

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  13. I was wrong, when we arrived in Port Pirie, we came by Railcar, as there wasn't enough passenger traffic between Adelaide and country towns to warrant running diesel engines. Our railcar was the Bluebird, there is a picture and information at Wikipedia.

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    1. River, that's terrific. Rail cars were also diesel powered but maybe not diesel electric. Victoria had them too for quiet lines.

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