Sunday, February 21, 2016

Sunday Selections - A Windsor Wander

Joining in with River and others for Sunday Selections.

Blimps were once a thing of fascination for me, but now, don't care much about them, especially as they are just used for very basic advertising now.


Our building has very strict rules about what can be visible on a balcony. Drying washing is verboten. While some don't like the rule, I don't like this scene in High Street, Windsor. Pity it is out of focus.


Some interesting architectural work here in Upton Road.


711 stores and similar convenience stores killed off local milk bars at speed. There are a few left, such as this one which is a prime example of why local milk bars were killed off. It looks disgusting, and yes, it is open, but I doubt for long. No doubt Asian owned by immigrants who get residency by investing in a business they don't car two hoots about.



A train passing by between Windsor and Prahran Stations.


Why is this park called Windsor Siding? I can see some hands shooting up. Before the train line was built from South Yarra to Windsor, if you wanted to travel to Brighton by train, you would catch the train to St Kilda and then another train with the line running in a large arc through what is now Albert Park Reserve, across St Kilda Road on a bridge, through suburban Windsor to Windsor Station and on to Brighton.


Once inside the park I discovered a very fine mural. The van belongs a graffiti removal contractor. I expect he is there to make an estimate for graffiti removal. Let me get closer.


A man with a dog was chatting to the contractor. He broke off to chat to me and asked if I like the mural. The man was Greek and about 40. I started to wander away and he followed me, chatting away about street art and evil graffitists who tag and spoil nice murals.


I was on a mission but I paused to take another photo of the park, with the Windsor Telephone Exchange dominating the area. Man and dog did not walk on but waited.


The man drew my attention to this mural, which he said had been partly painted over. Then came the coffee invitation at his nearby house. This is not the first time this has happened when I have been out and about. Is there something stamped on my forehead? I politely declined, then later wondered if I should have. Had he looked clean, I may have been tempted.


Rather nicely proportioned Victorian house with polychromatic Hawthorn bricks.


Can's see this mural properly, at the back of the Windsor Castle Hotel.


Old lounge room couches often feature on the verandahs of rented houses.


This is a tragedy. The artists slaved away in the boiling sun painting the mural in the very visible location above Queensway near Chapel Street. In less than a week it had been ruined. I cropped a bit of the road out but left the houses so you can get an idea of the size. It is big and spoilt.
To the stocks with the vandals for some rotten tomato treatment.


This building with its clerestory roof caught my eye.

I walked closer to get a photo of its street number, 153 Albert Street, Windsor. Much to my surprise, it is a very significant building. It was the office of the Post Master General, designed by Sir John Monash. It was the first government building in the Prahran area. It was later used as a post office. It has now been converted into a two storey Manhattan style apartment. You are correct if have guessed this information comes from a real estate website. Later it became a photographic studio. The building next door was also owned by the PMG, later its privatised telecommunications offshoot, Telstra.


Here is a photo of the interior from The Real Estate Conversion. Triple tandem parking, cellar, Aga stove, Japanese tiles, hydronic heating. I could live there. I just need about $2 million. This is exactly what to do with older buildings such as this one.


33 comments:

  1. Sigh on the graffiti front. Here murals *mostly* seem to discourage it. Though I still chuckle thinking of a politician some years ago who set up a photo op of him scrubbing a wall down to prove HE at least would be tough on grafitti. It was a government sponsored mural.
    Love the light in that conversion.

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    1. EC, that used to be case about murals, that they were generally left alone, but that is changing. Funny about the pollie scrubbing down the mural.

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  2. Oh my gosh. The Conversion is beautiful. 2 Mil, huh?

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    1. Snadra, yes, it would be pretty close to that, but would only be about US$1 million.

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  3. I like the hotel but the mural i interesting too

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  4. Great stuff with the architecture and mural.

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    1. It was an interesting wander, Blogoratti. Thanks.

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  5. I really like murals, none around here but closer to Sydney there are many.
    As for washing in flats and units, when first married we lived in a flat with clothes lines downstairs, we were on the third floor much fitter then but when I left things on the line overnight they would disappear happened a few times then I started using the balcony, a bit of a problem with sheets.
    Merle............

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    1. Merle, when I was young and briefly lived in a rented flat I had things stolen from the washing line. Yes, sheets would be a problem and when you are young they need changing quite often.

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  6. Street art is one thing but graffiti drives me mad. It can bring down an area overnight. Do occasionally see groups of young men doing community service scrubbing the walls. So you are often invited in for a cup of tea by complete strangers!!

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    1. Marie, in one of our more classy shopping streets, there are a couple of like pound shops. The shops have grills that the pull down overnight and these have been been covered in graffiti. The rest of the shops with glass windows are left alone. I understand why people use grills, but it becomes a self fulfilling problem. The worse things look, the more people will attack them. I am truly surprised about the graffiti on the large mural. Once or twice I have been invited in for coffee but invariably there is more on their mind than coffee.

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  7. Was just in the neighbourhood last night for a dinner party of Peel Street. It's a great neighbourhood.

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    1. A dinner party Ad Rad! How quaint. I remember those. By the time the main course was served, everyone was drunk and so engaged in conversation, who knew what we were eating. No matter. People remembered them as great dinner parties.

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  8. I consider graffiti taggers along the lines of unfixed male cats who spray mark their territory then along comes another male, sniffs about, and sprays over that tag, oops urine. Now maybe that's because I'm around cats a lot, but neutering male cats often ends the territorial marking, but only if all the males get neutered. So, guess we should get started eh? A bit of clippety clip and no more graffiti marking, oops, tagging.

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    1. Strayer, I like the way you are thinking and while there may be a little opposition to the remedy, there would be plenty of folk for it.

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  9. Ha Ha! You got chatted up by a 40 year old in a park, I got chatted up by an 80 year old in the supermarket. His English wasn't good, but I understood him pretty well. He asked if I was Greek and told me he was alone and has been looking for a good woman for a long time. (*~*)
    Nice photos.

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    1. River, good for you, even if he was 80. My last one was Greek too. Must be something about Greek men. Did you tell him, sorry, I am a very bad woman?

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  10. aah I used to nick down Upton St and I wondered what that would look like when it was finished. Very nice. Plenty of spots around here to photograph. Some really interesting old places amongst soulless new properties and a million flats going up.

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    1. Fen, millions of flats yes, but nothing like the scale of your old stamping ground in the inner north, where there are squillions of flats being built. Very few developers are recycling old factories. Just knock 'em down. What is wrong the the council of The People's Republic of Moreland?

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  11. oh and that blimp flew over me this morning as I wandered down the street. Stupid thing!

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    1. Fen, yes I saw it again today. Wouldn't it be fun to see it pop?

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  12. Interior is ok in the last photo.
    Hm! asked for 'coffee in a nearby house', Hm..wonder what the inside of the house was like - you will never know, and know doubt don't want to know.
    Some graffiti is ok.

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    1. Margaret, I do know. Probably was his parents house, small, cluttered, untidy and everything within would be cheap and nasty. I've seen enough of them to reinforce the stereotype.

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  13. My favourite is the place in the 3rd photo, with all the what looks like concrete pipe rings? ;) That is super funky in a good way.. :)

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    1. Snoskred, funky is such a good real estate agent word, but it does describe it well.

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  14. Lovely little Victorian with all the 'gingerbread' decorations seemingly intact!

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    1. Cranky, you can probably bet money on it being very nice inside, extended at the rear with a living area open to the back yard.

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  15. Andrew

    Your theory about the milk bar is possible but in my experience it is more common that run-down small shops are run by (often eccentric) people who have been running the business a while (sometimes in succession to their parents and own rather than lease the premises. Your hypothesis seems less likely: how would such a business be viable if you had to employ someone to attend the shop? It is difficult to a imagine such a business owner (on your hypothesis) attending shop themselves.

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    1. I know of two such milk bars, Marcellous, one of which I have been watching for over thirty years. Asian people take it over, run the business down, white Australians take it over and get the business tidy and successful and then the whole process was repeated.

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  16. I just took some shots today in North Perth of a really nice mural spoilt by taggers, such a pain! Where's the respect hey! So hey, chatted up, nice to know you've still got it hey Andrew :)

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    1. So I saw in today's post, Grace. I suspect my friend was on the desperate side.

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