Friday, January 01, 2016

A Friday quickie

While there are a few abbreviated words that are new to me, this really is how many Australians speak and I use a number of them myself but not the avocado word. I've never heard that.


51 comments:

  1. Happy New year old bean , hoping 2016 will be a cracker xxxxxxx

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    1. Cheers John, to you and The Prof too.

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  2. There was an ad up here featuring the avo word. Some of those I haven't heard, but I suspect I would recognise them all in context. And yes, I too use some of them. Don't we all?

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    1. EC, it just made me think of another abbreviation very close to the word avo. Seems we do use many of them.

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  3. Didn't realise we abbreviated so many of our words but after watching that, I realised I use almost all of them myself.

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    1. Ad Rad, sometimes they are used in a joking or sarcastic manner, aren't they.

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  4. Have a prosperous new year, and best wishes!

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    1. In return Blogoratti.

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  5. Happy New Year to all your mob down south.
    Merle...............

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  6. Have a healthy fabulous year in your hot Australia.

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    1. Gosia, can you post to me some snow? Oh, you don't have any.

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    2. Scrape a little frost out of your freezer. Make a snowball and toss it back and forth, then put it back in the freezer to use again.
      (*~*)

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    3. River, not really sadly, but we no longer have frost in our freezer. At times it was fun defrosting the fridge. There must be a post in that.

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  7. Like you there were some I didn't recognise and yes there are a lot there I use however it would be 'rellies' for me rather the 'rello'. Maybe the difference is state based - you know like the Devon v Luncheon meat thing.
    The New Year snuck in on us very quietly while we are sleeping - hope it is as good for you and R as it has promised to be for me and The Golfer

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    1. Gosh Cathy, we can't even get our abbreviations right. I would probably say rels.

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  8. Tradie, ego, cossie, trackies, musos, cabbies, sunnies, Salvos, cuppas, avos, undies, ciggies, brickies, sickies, Brissie, footy, spag bol, chewie, hubby etc are all correct and much loved.

    But some of the abbreviations were silly nonsense, just playing for the camera eg lappy (laptop) and tenno (tennis). Din-din (for dinner) stops promptly when a child turns 3.

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    1. Hels, I have heard lappy somewhere once. Yes, I've never heard tenno. Din-dins reappears once you are in care at a certain age.

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  9. Wishing you a joyous new year!

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    1. Cheers Jac. Hope the finger is healing quickly.

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  10. There's a spelling mistake in there! Devastated has two As not three Es. I know, pick, pick, pick.
    I do think they've abbreviated a few things that don't really need it. Does anybody really say lappy for laptop? Or tenno?
    Was fun to watch though.

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    1. River, I certainly prefer to have errors pointed out to me when I make them. You are a very good proof reader, I think. Clearly such mistakes slap you in the face. As I said, I have heard lappy once only and never tenno.

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    2. Wollongong was also incorrectly spelt.

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    3. Victor, perhaps that is why people abbreviate, because some place names are very difficult to spell. But still, getting the words right in a video about words should be quite basic.

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  11. P.S. Happy New Year, which can't be abbreviated. Try all you like, a years is always going to be 365 days.

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    1. Not always.

      366 this year.

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    2. That's funny River, because just yesterday I checked and as Marcellous says, 2016 is a leap year.

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    3. Well colour me embarrassed. I forgot about leap years.

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    4. Red face does not become you, River.

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  12. I don't have anything short enough to say...

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    1. Walt, it is hard to abbreviate Happy New Year :-P

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  13. Reading back it sounds like you had a busy but happy Christmas Andrew. It's been bliss having my son and family to stay but exhausting starting each day at 5am with gorgeous granddaughter :) Here's wishing R and yourself a wonderful New Year.. 2015 was a shocker for my family, it just has to be a better year!

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    1. I know how you feel about Christmas with early risers. Hope next year will be better for you.

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    2. Grace, while yours was particularly tragic, I haven't heard one person say that 2015 was a good year.

      Still recovering from the kiddies are you Diane?

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  14. A fun video. I didn't realise how many times we add i.e. on the end of words. They left out sanger for sandwich. Have a happy new year.

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    1. Diane, sanger is a good one too. Did they say barbie? Thanks and Happy New Year to you and TOH.

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  15. I think about 30-50% of these are sometimes used here too. But the habit of shortening a word and ending it with an o seems to be uniquely Australian. I can't say that I approve!

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    1. Craig, I am not surprised you don't approve and in theory maybe I don't but so often such words are used in a mocking manner. How can I explain. We may talk about our relatives, but if they are visiting, oh god, the rels are coming. The way we abbreviate probably requires more thought for a better explanation, which I may but probably won't do.

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  16. Agree. It is the "-o" ending which is distinctively Australian. "Limo" for limousine is international but that is a shortening, not a supplementary "-o."

    Never heard "tenno", but have heard:

    Disso (pronounced Dizzo) - District Court (as in "going down to the Dizzo")
    Compo
    Defo (defamation rather than definitely as the video has it).

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    1. Marcellous, I remember a tenner and that was so long ago it was a ten pound note. Dizzo sounds to like 'housos'. Housos making an appearance at Dizzo.

      I think you use a different phrase now as do we, but Compo or Workers' Comp was so easily understood. I am surprised to learn of defo.

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  17. Interesting video. Have heard of most of the Australian ones, use some on odd occasion..

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    1. Margaret, not too many I hope. Don't encourage the kiddies to use them. Oops, children :-P

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  18. I haven't done honest work in a long time but morning tea was always 'smoko' on construction sites, and in some factories as well. But among office types, who knows?
    Compo was always an option in factories, especially if you didn't like the job. A bloke we called the compo king went on it four times in one year. All from staged accidents. It horrifies management, this sort of thing, but gives everyone else a good laugh.

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    1. R H, compo rorting has been pretty well sorted now, to the point where it has become very difficult for genuinely injured people to claim for anything long term.

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  19. Too difficult for me !
    I saw the firework in Sidney on TV at noon ! Very beautiful ! The firework had been canceled in Brussels, but nevertheless interdiction or not the Belgians celebrated and booed the mayor ! Especially in Molenbeek where the terrorists came from. Just to show that they are not afraid of these crazy people !

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    1. Gattina, isn't it giving a victory to terrorists to cancel the fireworks?

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  20. A greater characteristic is how much we swear. A friend who lived here, returned to Scotland and came back noted within hours of arriving back, "I'd forgotten how much Australians swear". He then used the C word and said " It's great to be back ".

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    1. James, I am not much of one for swearing and I tend to save it for serious matters. Most people I mix with have no hesitation in using fuck and nor do I, but it is not a word used everyday in every sentence, more to indicate strong drama. I am pretty appalled at the way young people use fuck in every sentence.

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  21. There are doctors who'll order a neckbrace put on (as they did for the compo king) just to cover their own liability.
    I'm never against rorting compo, you'd need years in a shit wage factory to know why.

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    1. R H, there are different rortings. Retirement with so little from a company was compensated by an injury claim, and fair enough. Rich fat cats had super and the workers did not. I am more thinking along the lines of Current Affairs exposes, and I hasten to add I don't watch CA, where younger people fake an injury. It used to be called the Mediterranean back.

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  22. CA is an extension of the old Truth newspaper - and Rupert's News of the World; suburbanites with neat front lawns get a peep at outrageous goings on. Public housing getting trashed comes up regularly. Then sometimes there's a report that gets justice for some poor sod and I'm surprised.
    The Med back does good business around here, it's known as whiplash injury. I saw a case a few months ago at traffic lights in Melbourne road when a car appeared to run into the back of another. Two middle-eastern women jumped out of the first car and began screaming abuse at the car behind. The acting was faultless.

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