Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Youse can all get f******

We no longer use the word 'class' in everyday conversation. If we need a substitute we may say 'socio economic group', usually referring to the lower classes. It is so interesting to me that as a working class person, many of my contemporaries think of themselves as middle class. Times have changed.

A word like youse used to be referred to as a class marker word. I don't know what the modern non offensive word might be. I very much dislike the word youse. It sounds so..........common. (Being a little self critical, it seems like I believe that you can be working class but not common. Quite possibly so. I don't mid being working class but I would hate to be thought of us common) It would seem youse is also used in Britain and North America.

I would argue that a clear plural of you is needed. You is both singular and plural but at times it does not work well to describe the plural. If a good part of the western world is using the word youse, we do need a plural of you.

An inventor of clever words is Snoskred. What word might she come up with? Perhaps the deep south of the US has it right with y'all.


33 comments:

  1. Nathan's side of the family use youse a lot. I think it is very Aussie.

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    1. Ad Rad, it does seem to be the case and perhaps heard more often in the country.

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  2. Youse makes my flesh creep. Am I a snob? Perhaps. Linguistically anyway. I can't cope with fillum for film either. And say aitch rather than Haitch.
    I think that you is like sheep. You can be singular or plural and we have no need of youse. Despite ewes being perfectly valid.

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    1. EC, don't tell me there is no such word as sheeps?

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  3. I have trouble with english, I say a lot of words wrong so I often invent words for things, my clicker dicker for the tv remote control thing is now known by all along with a few others, I didn't think it was a class thing just a memory problem.
    Merle.........

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    1. Clicker dicker, Merle. I love it.

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  4. 'Youse' grates with me along with 'Dudes'.

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    1. Victor, I get more offended by being called a dude than almost anything else. In my mind a dude has to be young and I am not so keen on being called bud, either.

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  5. While the class system in the UK is alive and well I must say I have not come across youse except possibly in Liverpool?

    Speech is no longer quite the class indicator it was as even posh young now use street slang; it’s the level of education which is apparent in how you speak which gives you away as a member of one class or another.

    For me as a foreigner non-English mother tongue person it is all most interesting. There’s no class system in Germany, except that education is again the most indicative of your origins.

    I was a working class child and am now middle class, but only in England.

    Happy new year, Andrew.

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    1. Thanks Friko. Very interesting. At school two different German languages were taught, high German and low German. Is it not the case of one being higher class than the other?

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    2. High and Low? hmm, possibly, I wish I could ask my mum. I do know there is a High Lutheran Church and a Low Lutheran Church, so clearly the religions have class distinctions.

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  6. Hmm.. I do not have a word for this at this time.

    My made up words are usually silly ones and often have tory on the end - fascinatory, negatory, or they end in NY - for several years the nickname I had for the other half was bny, pronounced buh-nee.

    I will see if a word arrives! ;)

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    1. Snoskred, well it just having a bit of fun, so do try.

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    2. yem?
      Those-them, youse - yem
      okay, I'll go to bed now.

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    3. I like yem, River.

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  7. Recently read a novel set in Belfast and "youse" cropped up all the way through, obviously intended as part of the dialect. Wikipedia on "Irish English: says it is common in Dublin and across Ulster.

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    1. Marcellous, is the novel depressing? Good information, thanks.

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    2. Not really depressing but with a bit of the hard childhood stuff.

      It is by Brian Kennedy and called "The Arrival of Fergal Flynn."

      Here is an account of it from a review of its sequel:

      "Fergal Flynn told the story of an unhappy young Belfast teen whose homosexuality made him a target for his vicious brothers and earned him the contempt of his indifferent parents.

      His only solace comes courtesy of a sexual relationship (of the warm and loving as opposed to the abusive variety) with a priest, Father Dermot McManus, who recognises the singing talent that will ultimately be Fergal's salvation, and makes him hope for a better life."

      Wikipedia says that "Kennedy came out as gay in 2009" which is a bit of a joke given that this novel was published in 2004 and it was sufficiently autobiographical and its sympathies so on its sleeve that there can't really have been much coming out left to do.

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  8. Mate and definitely bloke sounds very old fashioned these days and 'youse' might be common but not coarse. I can put up with guy/guys but dude creeps me out. R is a gentleman unless he's out shopping with that 'bit of rough' he cohabits with. Hangover finished?

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    1. Jah Teh, I don't say mate usually but I still use bloke. This bit of rough did not feel rough at all after Doctor Glenfidich's visit.

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  9. Do not like the word 'yous'. Why can't people say, 'you are'?
    Hate 'kids' for children also. Our language/pronunciation has become extremely lazy.

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    1. Note to self: Do not use kids on Margaret's blog or when replying to her comments.

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  10. Youse is a dreadful word and thankfully I never here it. I agree with the above poster that in the UK at least, it's more common in Liverpool. Dude gets me pissed off to and, dare I say it to an Australian, mate? People who call me mate when they don't know me, irritates the hell out of me. I suppose that it's such a popular term with you that you don't notice it?

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    1. Sadly Craig, the word mate is mostly used as a term of abuse here now. "What's your problem, mate?" It could also be used as a precursor word in 'films' where one of two straight guys says, "no way mate", and then we go on to find out no way mate was not really a no.

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    2. Blimey - I must proof read my comments more fully, sorry! hear/here and too/to. Really, I'm not quite as stupid as I appear to be!

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    3. Did not even notice, Craig. Blimey. Now there is word to wonder about.

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    4. "I say you chaps, what's it all about" :) No need for 'youse' ever! Do enjoy a good old 'blimey' now and then :)

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    5. Grace, Happy Hogmanay to you. I like 'stone the flamin' crows' after blimey.

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    6. Oops Grace, sounds like meant happy new year, which I kind of do, but Hogmanay last for three days, so I hope you are remembering your roots and celebrating.

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  11. I realise now the word I use in place of "yous" is "People" or "peoples" :)

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    1. Snoskred, I rather like peoples. Youse peoples can all get..

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  12. You could try Y'all, as the southerners do in USA.
    I would think you are upper working class, which is pretty much equal to middle class, but there is also middle working class and lower working class, the working poor, reflected by annual incomes. Below that is the rest of the poverty stricken masses, those who are there by circumstance, those who are there by choice, doesn't really matter, they are the lower classes. Sad, but true. I always thought Australia was classless, but over the years, I have been proven wrong.

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  13. River, my last sentence in my post mentioned y'all. I don't mind the word but I don't think it is for Australian speech. I am happy with being upper working class. Generally, money withstanding, Australians can choose what class they want to be. Perhaps that is the best thing about Australia.

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