Saturday, December 19, 2015

Mud Bath

There was a tradie in the lift with me as I arrived home late morning. He left the lift at my floor and remarked that our hot water may off for a short time. "Mainline pipe leaking", he said. I thanked him for telling me. Shortly after he knocked at the door and asked if our hot water was off. No, I replied. Oh, I need to turn more valves off. Yes, he does. I remember that from when I replaced tap washers with ceramic discs.

Maybe half an hour later he again knocked at the door and asked if he could check the sink tap. I let him and he is obviously experienced at highrise homes where Asian people might live and took his boots off. He turned on the kitchen sink tap and asked me if the pressure was normal. I replied, I think so but it normally delivers clear water, not mud. Yes folk, the water was very brown and at times very dark brown. I could see heaps of sediment coming through. The plumber explained that the header tanks had been stirred up and it would soon clear. I told him that there is no aerator or restrictor at the bath. We will turn that on. I turned the bath taps on and brown water just kept flowing and flowing. At some point it was clear the water was so heavy with sediment that the plumber said, I will go down to the gym shower and run the water off there. Good, I thought. We are paying for this hot water.


I sluiced most of the sediment in the bath away with a couple of buckets of cold water but obviously not that well and R later had to clean his bath. When I arrived home that evening I asked R if the hot water was clear and he said yes, but it is cold. Oh, this late means it won't be fixed by the morning and I will have to just have a wash in the morning instead of a shower. R says I am such a disbeliever and will never take his word for anything and that is partly correct. Nevertheless I went to my bathroom, turned on the hot tap and lovely clean hot water flowed, much to our relief. Cinderella did have a lovely hot and clean shower next morning. 

25 comments:

  1. I am so glad to hear that a clean Cinderella went out to face the world.

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    1. EC, Cinders does need her morning shower.

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  2. That's a good fairy godmother you've got there!

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    1. Jayne, who you calling a fairy!

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  3. Ick! Glad it's sorted now.

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    1. Was pretty icky Jac but not as bad as the kitchen sink plug hole story.

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  4. There are four signs that a family is living in a civilised and cultivated home - a fine library, espresso coffee, quality wine and a hot, luxurious bath/shower.

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    1. Hels, oh dear we strike out with only the luxurious hot water to save us. We go out for decent coffee and wine. Our library is best described as eclectic.

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    2. So am I uncivilised? uncultivated? or both? I do have hot running water, (even from my cold taps in this weather).

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    3. River, I consider it to be great flattery to be described as well read, and I would describe you as that.

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  5. Heartwarming glowing happy ending Christmas story. Ha ha. No more mud for the tub.

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    1. Strayer, maybe I should have put the plug and after the mud had settled siphon off the water for a real mud bath.

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    2. And taken a photo!

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  6. On the upside, at least this happened in summer, so a cold shower/wash wouldn't have been such a hardship. Imagine if it was August!
    Nice that you got the clean hot water back though.

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    1. River, I don't do cold showers, summer or winter. It would be a boil the kettle job and fill the wash basin, as we did when former Premier Jeff Kennett shut off our gas for ten days, although I may have had a shower or two at work as it had electric hot water.

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    2. Me too. The only cold showers I ever had were at the beach in Port Pirie, up in the changing rooms where people washed off the salt and sand before going home. Mot of the time I didn't bother though, home was a ten minute walk away, but there was no shower, just a bath back in those days. We had to light the chip heater and wait for it to warm up.

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  7. I'll take a day of cold brown water if it means that a random tradie comes to my door two or three times and then asks to come in :)

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    1. Really Craig? These are not my words but the plumber was described by someone near and dear as being an ageing balding overweight red head with pig Irish eyes and bad skin. If that is your tradie fantasy, good on you. Believe me, if he had been hot, I would have slipped in a double entendre at the very least.

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    2. I take it back then. The fantasy is ruined.

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  8. Based on your opening line, I thought this blogpost was (hopefully) going to go off in a far more different/interesting direction :)

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    1. James, sorry to disappoint your older man fantasies. While mud in some situations is not impossible for me to imagine, I generally hate getting dirty.

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  9. Thank goodness it came clear and was hot. Need lovely clean water for the shower. We don't realise how precious water is until we haven't got it.

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    1. Margaret, gushing hot water is something I think about often enough and very much appreciate it.

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